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  • Best kitchen gadget for husband who burns water

    Oh, I wish my title was a joke but DH actually managed to burn water (in the bottom of the steamer) the other night when left to finish dinner while I went to yoga!

    Next year I'm increasing my work hours on the proviso that he does more home duties. He's very keen to cook more but only knows how to make Bolognese, roast chicken, pumpkin soup and tuna pasta.

    I'm wondering if there is any sort of kitchen gadget or appliance that would be a big help for him. I'm an experienced cook and have lots of my own gadgets.

    Maybe there is one of these I should focus on teaching him how to use?

    We already have:
    Mirowave
    Kettle and toaster
    Sandwich press
    Jaffle maker
    Waffle iron
    Pressure cooker/multi cooker (my #1 but he finds all the options a bit overwhelming)
    Manual rotary slicer/grater
    Slow juicer
    Hand stick blender with whisk and chopper bowl
    Food processor
    Hand mixer
    Mandolin/V-slicer
    Stand planetary mixer
    Ice cream maker
    Smoothie wizz type blender with nut grinder blade
    Microwave rice cooker

    I've had a slow cooker in the past, which is nice and simple but he struggles with forward planning,
    so I'm unsure on that one.

    Based on that list, don't ask me where I will store another appliance! However if there's something that you think is a must have for a novice cook, please let me know!!

  • #2
    I do love my thermomix. The bonus is there’s so many meals you can make that are pretty much all cooked in it bar maybe some rice etc. The bonus is that it dings when it finishes each cooking step. I turned my nose up at them when I first heard about them as I assumed they were just a glorified food processor. Then I went to a demo and was actually impressed. I use mine most days, even if it’s for simple things. I do need to use it more, but finding time to even scratch my head with both kids at the moment is a challenge.

    Comment


    • #3
      I’m not sure if a gadget would help but perhaps some recipes ideas, things you can cook together a couple of times (with you taking the lead) and then he can make on his own. Sounds more like he needs some cooking skills rather than a gadget.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Stretched View Post
        Oh, I wish my title was a joke but DH actually managed to burn water (in the bottom of the steamer) the other night when left to finish dinner while I went to yoga!

        Next year I'm increasing my work hours on the proviso that he does more home duties. He's very keen to cook more but only knows how to make Bolognese, roast chicken, pumpkin soup and tuna pasta.

        I'm wondering if there is any sort of kitchen gadget or appliance that would be a big help for him. I'm an experienced cook and have lots of my own gadgets.

        Maybe there is one of these I should focus on teaching him how to use?

        We already have:
        Mirowave
        Kettle and toaster
        Sandwich press
        Jaffle maker
        Waffle iron
        Pressure cooker/multi cooker (my #1 but he finds all the options a bit overwhelming)
        Manual rotary slicer/grater
        Slow juicer
        Hand stick blender with whisk and chopper bowl
        Food processor
        Hand mixer
        Mandolin/V-slicer
        Stand planetary mixer
        Ice cream maker
        Smoothie wizz type blender with nut grinder blade
        Microwave rice cooker

        I've had a slow cooker in the past, which is nice and simple but he struggles with forward planning,
        so I'm unsure on that one.

        Based on that list, don't ask me where I will store another appliance! However if there's something that you think is a must have for a novice cook, please let me know!!

        In regards to the slow cooker .. Could you do dump bags and freeze them so all he needs to do is get one out of the freezer the night before , put it in the fridge to defrost then in the morning , dump it all into the slow cooker ? In winter , I do these bags up weekly and they are super handy. Just a suggestion

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by granny1 View Post
          In regards to the slow cooker .. Could you do dump bags and freeze them so all he needs to do is get one out of the freezer the night before , put it in the fridge to defrost then in the morning , dump it all into the slow cooker ? In winter , I do these bags up weekly and they are super handy. Just a suggestion
          Originally posted by babyno1onboard View Post
          I’m not sure if a gadget would help but perhaps some recipes ideas, things you can cook together a couple of times (with you taking the lead) and then he can make on his own. Sounds more like he needs some cooking skills rather than a gadget.
          Both of these, out sounds like some simple recipes and meal ideas would be beneficial more than another gadget (unless you have your eye on one)

          The dump bags are a good idea, use the multicooker in slow cook. I know people find them daunting but I don't know why 🤷‍♀️ they're so easy, you can only use one function at any time. I love mine! My extended family love anything I cook in it, I've offered to lend it to my mum, but do you think she will try? [emoji28]

          Can you start with a simple meal like chop up veggies - potato, carrot, capsicum, onion, tomato, parsnip (whatever you like), put them on a tray with a drizzle of olive oil (or quick spray), sprinkle herbs on and bake (oven/air frier), with some steamed peas (microwave), and a meat (oven/airfrier) is easiest! Especially if it's a chicken piece/kebab, or chop. Then it just comes down to timing, how long he leaves things in the oven for to make sure is all done together. (Some written notes would be helpful ie, put hard veg in, 30 mins later add soft and kebabs)

          Burgers
          Tacoes take no time at all, and are super easy! He can already brown mince if he can do spag bol, the rest is prepping salad ingredients and warming the taco shell. Dinners done.

          Start with simple and quick, once he gets the skills he can look at recipes and branch out slowly.
          Last edited by EnchantedGrace; 12-12-2020, 07:25.

          Comment


          • #6
            Thermomix is about as easy as you can get with guided cooking.

            Comment


            • #7
              Look for pressure cooker recipes that are one step, or atleast just searing the meat and then dumping everything else in and turning it on.

              Maybe it's not the cooking that's the problem, but that he's feeling overwhelmed with deciding and food prep. Could you sit down together and do a meal plan on Sunday, then prep all of the food together, so he knows exactly what needs doing during the week? As he builds confidence, he might take over more of it himself.

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks for the input.

                He's asked family for some "cooking for dummies" type cookbooks already, so hopefully they will help.

                He will not take direction or suggestion from me (on anything, not just cooking). I have some awesome "30 minute meals" cookbooks that I've tried to get him to at least flip through. I feel like giving the books to his brother to hand to him and then I'm sure he'd then be raving about how amazing they are.

                I do dump bags myself already and do huge batch cooks etc. The thing is I don't want to spend 3 hours on the weekend food prepping so he can then "cook" through the week. I need him to take the workload of cooking off from me.

                We worked out early in our relationship that we need to stay out of the kitchen if the other is working in there. So no chance of me being able to teach him. He has no ideas of timing (is chronically late for everything) and this flows into cooking. Even when the recipe says 60 minutes prep and 30 minutes cooking, he will say "oh it won't take that long"... 2 hours later...

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Stretched View Post
                  Thanks for the input.

                  He's asked family for some "cooking for dummies" type cookbooks already, so hopefully they will help.

                  He will not take direction or suggestion from me (on anything, not just cooking). I have some awesome "30 minute meals" cookbooks that I've tried to get him to at least flip through. I feel like giving the books to his brother to hand to him and then I'm sure he'd then be raving about how amazing they are.

                  I do dump bags myself already and do huge batch cooks etc. The thing is I don't want to spend 3 hours on the weekend food prepping so he can then "cook" through the week. I need him to take the workload of cooking off from me.

                  We worked out early in our relationship that we need to stay out of the kitchen if the other is working in there. So no chance of me being able to teach him. He has no ideas of timing (is chronically late for everything) and this flows into cooking. Even when the recipe says 60 minutes prep and 30 minutes cooking, he will say "oh it won't take that long"... 2 hours later...
                  Many recipes involve jars and pre-packaged ingredients, but the 4 ingredient cookbooks are really simple.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I agree maybe some recipes. I have a Donna hay book that has lots of one pan/tray type recipes that are very simple.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      My DH does not cook much. I make a meal plan based on him 'cooking' within his comfort level once or twice a week.

                      I regularly get him to make burgers, sausages, pizza (I prepare bases), bolognese, stir-fry (I do prep all the veg though), steak.

                      Despite the guided cooking he doesn't use the thermomix. I love my TM. He loves what is made in it. But we don't have the time to run through everything on it.

                      Maybe both choose a new recipe a week/fortnight/month that he is comfortable learning or making.

                      I would not get a new appliance if he is not comfortable using what you have IMO.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by twinklify View Post
                        My DH does not cook much. I make a meal plan based on him 'cooking' within his comfort level once or twice a week.

                        I regularly get him to make burgers, sausages, pizza (I prepare bases), bolognese, stir-fry (I do prep all the veg though), steak.

                        Despite the guided cooking he doesn't use the thermomix. I love my TM. He loves what is made in it. But we don't have the time to run through everything on it.

                        Maybe both choose a new recipe a week/fortnight/month that he is comfortable learning or making.

                        I would not get a new appliance if he is not comfortable using what you have IMO.
                        Thanks, I wasn't sure. I was already a pretty competent cook when I left home (and only ever had frypan/saucepan/oven when I learned) so I just don't know if there are things around nowadays that help the novice.

                        Interesting to hear your DH doesn't use the TM even with the guided cooking.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          He sounds so much like my DH, [MENTION=48748]Stretched[/MENTION]. DH can cook a few meals (and does a couple really well) but for the most part loathes anything new and a 30 minute dish turns into a 3 hour affair. As a result we often ate the same meals over and over again, sometimes consecutively.

                          So... I've been thinking of ways to better facilitate his cooking and what I did was write up a couple of recipes myself, with the clearest instructions possible e.g Turn the heat low. Now set the timer for 5 minutes and keep stirring the whole time. It saves the headache and ensuing argument of "They looked cooked, so I stopped stirring" or "You said they had to cook for 5 minutes, so I cooked them for 5 minutes" (by leaving them on high heat with no stirring which will result in uneven cooking) and so on and so forth. With very direct/specific instruction there is no room for assumptions nor error.

                          He certainly wants to contribute but lacks the know-how, so I figured this was the best way going forward.
                          I am not an early bird or a night owl.
                          I am some form of permanently exhausted pigeon.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by babyno1onboard View Post
                            I’m not sure if a gadget would help but perhaps some recipes ideas, things you can cook together a couple of times (with you taking the lead) and then he can make on his own. Sounds more like he needs some cooking skills rather than a gadget.
                            i’d agree with this. it’s not the lack of gadgets, it’s the lack of skill. it sounds like your kitchen has more than adequate gadgetry, certainly enough for even a basic home cook who knows their way around a kitchen to churn out a few decent meals. if he’s struggling still, it sounds like he doesn’t even have the basics under control.

                            i’d focus on him learning one or two meals and doing them well, that way you can reliably leave him and know you can come home to something have decent.

                            i would give the slow cooker another go, it’s literally idiot proof and with the right ingredients and recipe, it’s literally load and leave. i use it on busy days where i have no dinner and kids are home and i know i’ll have something substantial for dinner thar night.

                            even a basic chicken and veg curry in the slow cooker would be a start. chuck the meat in (if the cooker has a brown function he could brown the meat first but it’s not absolutely necessary) then the chopped veg and pour over the sauce from the jar. set on high for 6 hours and there’s dinner done. we do microwave pouch rice as it’s quick and no washing up. that would be an easy one to start with?

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                            • #15
                              My husband isn’t a great cook and he loves the guided cooking on our Thermomix because there is really no guess work.

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