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Plastic Free July

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  • HappyDaysAllRound
    replied
    Subbing to read tonight 👍

    Leave a comment:


  • LJD23
    replied
    I know this isn’t plastic but I’ve been going through DS old clothes and there are some stuff that are no good to be donated/sold. Is there somewhere I can take these to be recycled rather than putting them in the red bin for landfill?

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  • BH-bubhub
    replied
    I found the details of the places where you can currently drop off plastic lids for Lids for Kids.

    https://envision.org.au/bottle-top-drop-off-locations/


    Sadly nothing near us. I'm going to post in our local FB groups and see if any of the local cafes and schools can become drop off points.

    Leave a comment:


  • babybeeno1
    replied
    Not sure if this has been added or not. But the bit you open tor canned drinks with you can recycle seperately as they get melted down and made into prosthetic legs etc. I pull ours off for a friend of my dads who has collected them for years for someone who does this

    Leave a comment:


  • SSecret Squirrel
    replied
    Originally posted by BH-bubhub View Post
    Found this about plastic bottle tops
    https://www.suez.com.au/en-AU/sustai...ps/bottle-tops



    I found this article for someone in Canberra who recycles plastic lids into prosthetic arms and hands for kids. It's called Lids for Kids

    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-06-...hands/11249628

    https://www.facebook.com/Lids4KidsAU/

    Trying to see if I can get some more contact details. Would be great if all our local schools were collection points for Brisbane...
    Thanks for this tip too. I had no idea that bottle tops weren't recycable and always put milk bottles etc in the recycling bin with the tops still on.

    Leave a comment:


  • SSecret Squirrel
    replied
    Originally posted by BH-bubhub View Post
    Something they mentioned in the 2040 Movie. The search engine Ecosia gives their profits to planting trees. It says over 60 million planted so far.

    https://www.ecosia.org/

    I've switched to that as my default search engine on my desktop. And I'll try and work out how to do that on my phone too.
    Thanks so much for linking this. I've switched search engines and "earnt" 61 trees so far.
    Also ecosia seems to have exploded in recent months - the 2040 movie was obviously great PR. I've just watched a zero waste youtube video and ecosia was one of their recommendations. The video was released in March 2019 and the screenshot of the homepage had the ticker at 10 million trees planted. It is now 61 million.

    Leave a comment:


  • BH-bubhub
    replied
    Found this about plastic bottle tops
    https://www.suez.com.au/en-AU/sustai...ps/bottle-tops

    It is difficult to recover small, loose bottle tops from mixed kerbside recycling with sorting technology currently used in Materials Recycling Facilities (MRFs). However, technology is always improving, and we may be able to sort bottle tops more efficiently in the future.

    Bottle tops and lids must always be removed from any bottle or container you place in your recycling bin. Bottle tops and lids larger than the size of a business card (eg. lids from jam jars) are much easier to sort, and can be placed in recycling bins, provided they are separated from the bottle or container.
    At this time, plastic bottle tops smaller than the size of a business card should not be placed in recycling bins, but steel and aluminium bottle tops can be recycled if you follow the directions below.

    Bottle tops are too small to get collected in the sorting process, but if placed in a can of the same metal type they will get collected for melting with the appropriate material. To present these bottle tops for recycling you need to:
    1. Wash the bottle tops to remove any food residue
    2. Place the clean bottle tops inside a can of similar material – if a magnet sticks to it, it is steel – if not, it is aluminium.
    3. Squeeze the can to close it so the bottle tops don’t fall out
    4. Put the can in the correct recycling bin

    The steel and aluminium from bottle tops can be turned into street signs, car parts and new bottle tops.




    I found this article for someone in Canberra who recycles plastic lids into prosthetic arms and hands for kids. It's called Lids for Kids

    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-06-...hands/11249628

    https://www.facebook.com/Lids4KidsAU/

    Trying to see if I can get some more contact details. Would be great if all our local schools were collection points for Brisbane...

    Leave a comment:


  • BH-bubhub
    replied
    And apparently it's too small and it falls through the sorting machines and ends up in general waste.

    I saw somewhere about plastic bottle tops too. But I always put those in recycling - taken off the bottle as they are often different colours.

    Leave a comment:


  • Stretched
    replied
    Originally posted by Calstar View Post
    What?! Why?!
    It jams the machines.

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  • gorgeousgeorge
    replied
    Yeah (not that i shred stuff) but how come you can put paper but not shredded paper??? I thought that'd just make it easier to recycle it?

    Leave a comment:


  • Calstar
    replied
    Originally posted by BH-bubhub View Post
    I've only just realised that you can't put shredded paper into the recycle bin. You can put it in a compost bin if it's ordinary paper or newspaper. Not that I shred that much anyway.
    What?! Why?!

    Leave a comment:


  • BH-bubhub
    replied
    I've only just realised that you can't put shredded paper into the recycle bin. You can put it in a compost bin if it's ordinary paper or newspaper. Not that I shred that much anyway.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sirena89
    replied
    Originally posted by BH-bubhub View Post
    Wow, that is a crazy amount of waste - even worse that most of it's not recyclable - for one toy (that's made of plastic).

    I just think about the amount of waste we create on Christmas Day when the whole family is gathered. The packaging from the presents for the younger kids is just phenomenal.

    We do no presents for bday. We have 5 kids, and older ones invite whole class and the one year i let them have the presents, we ended we so much stuff we didnt need. Unnecessary stuff gives me anxiety
    So we give a present that the child really wants, that we try source second hand, and a special day of experience, like a trampoline world, laser fight etc. And they are allowed to invite whoever they want to the party, which is planned so that it generates minimal waste.
    For xmas, we wrap presents in pillowcases. They actua,ly look great. What a waste of money to buy wrapping paper, only to rip it and toss in the bin

    For other people we buy movie tickets or just put few dollars in with a homemade card.

    Ok, so I am a stay at home mum, so I have some time to do things from scratch and plan

    Leave a comment:


  • babyno1onboard
    replied
    Originally posted by SSecret Squirrel View Post
    Do you have problems with maggots in your wheelie bin doing this?
    I use bin liners and still get maggots 🤢

    Leave a comment:


  • babyno1onboard
    replied
    Originally posted by Stretched View Post
    Please tell me this doesn't apply to cellulose based plastics (eg. I'm currently using sugar cane based bin liners)?
    Anything that goes in your waste bin that the council collects goes into landfill. So it doesn’t matter if it’s biodegradable or not. Actually biodegradable stuff in landfill isn’t great as it generates gas as it breaks down. Biodegradable stuff is only really useful if you are going to put it in your compost bin or something. Or if it’s a product that may accidentally end up in the environment.

    Leave a comment:

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