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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by monnie24 View Post
    I think it's important.

    When I socialise with non Childcare kids I notice a gap.
    Interesting observation. I can say as an Early Childhood Educator that your anecdote doesn't fit the majority, thankfully -except in areas of disadvantage and abuse. My 5year old who never stepped foot in daycare is extremely social and well adjusted. She could name colours, shapes and counting to 10 by 18 months old. She could read all the letters of the alphabet by 2 and was writing her name by 2.5. Now she is top of her class at school & is extremely well behaved. That's my anecdote. Does that mean my daughter is bright because she didnt go to daycare? No, she is just bright. But trust me, there are no gaps

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  3. #32
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    I'm not thrilled with our experiences of childcare. I read a lot about the different activities etc but the 3 centres that my girls have attended (we have moved towns so changed) have not had any more, and in fact much less, on offer than the activities we do at home. I'm actually very surprised at what is acceptable as 'learning'. I'm a big believer in play based learning but staff still need to question and seek opportunities to extend areas of interest for children. The expectation of manners and problem solving have also been lower than our expectations at home and this can be frustrating. And the more in depth discussions about comprehending "why" things are so certainly haven't happened as much in care as they do at home. Having said that, my girls do attend one day per week for socialisation reasons. Again, it hasn't been of great benefit bit they did need to learn to be away from me and in the 'rough and tumble' of other kids. But i would have no qualms if they never attended and went straight into kindy when the time came either. For us, the one on one time (or two on one with our twins) with a parent is the best learning for our kids and i want to be the one there doing it. None of this is saying it's "right", just that it's right for us.

  4. #33
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    Default How do you feel about Childcare / early learning?

    Quote Originally Posted by cheeeeesecake View Post
    Interesting observation. I can say as an Early Childhood Educator that your anecdote doesn't fit the majority, thankfully -except in areas of disadvantage and abuse. My 5year old who never stepped foot in daycare is extremely social and well adjusted. She could name colours, shapes and counting to 10 by 18 months old. She could read all the letters of the alphabet by 2 and was writing her name by 2.5. Now she is top of her class at school & is extremely well behaved. That's my anecdote. Does that mean my daughter is bright because she didnt go to daycare? No, she is just bright. But trust me, there are no gaps
    Do u think maybe the fact as a educator you had the resources? Knew what to do? Some parents don't (don't flame me again people who use childcare) parents with SINGLE) children enjoy parenthood much easier then two. My kids are ten months apart. I struggled. I actually started because @VicPark suggested it and I don't regret it one bloody day!!!!

    I'm not talking how 'intelligent' kids are'. I notice the confidence in children etc and I really think if mum wants a break think that's okay. If mums stressed to eye balls not remembering milk, bread, bills then yes that's okay because the house hold will be okay. The kids will be too. The kids will survive in a *loving centre* not a **** one.

    I'll also add my kids went to childcare because I had PND, PTSD and I can't provide what they need. Im not well educated. I don't know maths, spelling etc. but my daughter is bright as thrives off learning so I send her as with DS and his apps she loves it.
    Last edited by monnie24; 09-10-2016 at 02:12.

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  6. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by monnie24 View Post
    Do u think maybe the fact as a educator you had the resources? Knew what to do? Some parents don't (don't flame me again people who use childcare) parents with SINGLE) children enjoy parenthood much easier then two. My kids are ten months apart. I struggled. I actually started because @VicPark suggested it and I don't regret it one bloody day!!!!

    I'm not talking how 'intelligent' kids are'. I notice the confidence in children etc and I really think if mum wants a break think that's okay. If mums stressed to eye balls not remembering milk, bread, bills then yes that's okay because the house hold will be okay. The kids will be too. The kids will survive in a *loving centre* not a **** one.

    I'll also add my kids went to childcare because I had PND, PTSD and I can't provide what they need. Im not well educated. I don't know maths, spelling etc. but my daughter is bright as thrives off learning so I send her as with DS and his apps she loves it.
    Yes I do think my training has helped me feel confident in early education of my children - but at the same time, I dont think you need a degree to provide quality early experiences for a 3 year old. Just going for a walk provides plenty of opportunities to explore bugs, animals, gardens, leaves, flowers, road safety, social skills at the park, physical development (I could go on, but point made).


    You absolutely dont need to justify your reasons for using daycare. Ok course if mum wants a break or is stressed, daycare is OK. Even if she isnt stressed, daycare is ok. Either way, daycare is ok But it isn't true to say that there are gaps between daycare and home care kids.

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  8. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by cheeeeesecake View Post
    Yes I do think my training has helped me feel confident in early education of my children - but at the same time, I dont think you need a degree to provide quality early experiences for a 3 year old. Just going for a walk provides plenty of opportunities to explore bugs, animals, gardens, leaves, flowers, road safety, social skills at the park, physical development (I could go on, but point made).


    You absolutely dont need to justify your reasons for using daycare. Ok course if mum wants a break or is stressed, daycare is OK. Even if she isnt stressed, daycare is ok. Either way, daycare is ok But it isn't true to say that there are gaps between daycare and home care kids.
    Surely you can see that your background means you can make the experience of a walk more educational for your child? You know the right questions to ask and in her right way?

    Maybe if you were judging two well equipped parents I could see how there *may* be no gap between daycare and home kids. However
    if the parents of two separate kids weren't well equipped ... And one sent their kid to daycare surely that child would have an advantage?

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  10. #36
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    The research actually shows that what happens in the home influences the child the most, even for those who do attend daycare. There is no 'advantage' as such. There have been several studies on this. Granted it's been a long time since I looked in to it, but that is what the research used to say, and I would be surprised if it was any different now. (Exceptions on kids from disadvantaged or a abusive families).
    As for us, we had one child attend a pre-school program in a daycare setting, the others attend a pre-school. I was a sahm, and we couldn't afford daycare. We attended other activities for socialisation, and the one child that did attend daycare settled in really well and wasn't any different to the kids who had been to daycare from babies, even though we only started at 3 years old.
    In hindsight, I probably would have enjoyed my kids more if I had a break from them, and didn't have them 7 days a week, 24/7...but we couldn't afford to send them anyway so it didn't matter. However, I don't think my kids were disadvantaged in any way for not going...probably slightly advantaged in that they had a stronger immune system when they started daycare/pre-school so they weren't constantly sick for the first 6 months. But that's it.
    In this day and age it's hard to have the village, and daycare is often the village for many parents. I don't think there's any problems with utilising daycare for a parent's sanity so they can recharge if they are finding it difficult to have small children at home all the time.
    Last edited by Full House; 09-10-2016 at 06:56.

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  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by monnie24 View Post
    She's worried that they might have routine or maybe get a plastic toy
    My kid's have plenty of plastic toys and routine 😐

    Oh and you're rude.
    Last edited by Unschooling4; 09-10-2016 at 17:15.

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  14. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unschooling4 View Post
    My kid's have plenty of plastic toys and routine 😐

    Oh and you're rude.
    Don't let it get to you. I just thought it was yet another rude post from that poster.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Full House View Post
    Don't let it get to you. I just thought it was yet another rude post from that poster.
    That must be exactly what it was. Seriously?

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    I'm not a huge fan of CC, but I'm a SAHM. I understand some women, especially in the city where rent and mortgages are insane, have to work. And why they are very touchy on the subject - because they feel the guilt from society. Which might I say you can't win with - you are either a lazy SAHM or a selfish working mum.... but I digress lol

    Is it needed? I think it depends on the child and the family situation. I found the first child can benefit from socialisation if they don't have similar aged kids around them. Also, sometimes the parents mental health may not be good so it can be good for everyone to get a break. I don't particularly believe it's needed educationally, but I do think pre school/pre-prep is crucial.

    Quote Originally Posted by Unschooling4 View Post
    I don't want my children institutionalised (they aren't in school either ) but I understand others might not have that choice.
    What do you mean by institutionalised?

    Unfortunately if you children plan to get any type of further education, to ever hold a job and play any role in society they will be 'institutionalised' by your standards.

    You are the parent, and it's ultimately your decision, but the way you see school and parenting is very black and white, and your language in a lot of threads lately is why you get a reaction. it comes across passively judgmental.

    There are kids out there neglected, unloved and abused. Going to child care a couple of days a week is the least of your problems.

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