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  1. #111
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    Default How do you feel about Childcare / early learning?

    Quote Originally Posted by Unschooling4 View Post
    School is not the real world. Being stuck in a classroom with the same people, the same age as you and being forced to socialise with people you might not like, being forced to learn from a text book, asking permission to use the toilet. Ain't the real world.
    Don't take this the wrong way, as I don't condemn your parenting choices, but it sounds like a couple of jobs I had...... almost every job I had in fact.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Carbink View Post
    Children don't need to learn in very young age. I'd like to let them enjoy their childhood and make friends.
    My child is definitely making friends and enjoying his childhood at his preschool! Most kids would a good center.

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    Most early childhood learning centers are child led and play-based, they are learning through play and interactions with others, not sitting down having the alphabet drilled into them.

    Last week was foresting week at my son's preschool to learn about autumn. They went for walks through the little forest in our local park, built a fort with sticks, collected chestnuts and leaves, etc. In his classroom there was a table with dirt and real vegetables like carrots and radishes to dig up and plant. Another table with dirt and leaves and animals. The children walk around freely and choose what tables they want to play at. That is learning when you are a preschool age child. It is also fun for them to have the opportunity to have these experiences and do things you may not think to do at home, with heaps of other children to build and navigate relationships with.

    To be fair unschooling, many times a lot of the responses and questions you receive are usually following a negative comment like you don't want your children abused in child care. That feels like a passive aggressive judgement towards people who choose childcare for whatever reason. Yes there was a past thread where you were very tolerant and patient about answering unschooling questions, but since then I've found many of your comments in threads along the lines of what I mentioned above which leads to a snowball effect of people reacting.

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  5. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unschooling4 View Post
    School is not the real world. Being stuck in a classroom with the same people, the same age as you and being forced to socialise with people you might not like, being forced to learn from a text book, asking permission to use the toilet. Ain't the real world.
    I removed my kids because of anxiety, behavior issues, bullying but i also removed them for a better life. So they can lead their own learning and education. So they are well rested and not stressed. I removed them for more family time.

    The OP asked what people thought about daycare. I answered.
    I disagree with this as well. You've pretty well outlined my husband's life at the moment but substitute work for school. He's stuck with people he cannot stand. They are all of similar age. He's forced to teach himself how to fix multi million dollar machinery from a text book because no one can be bothered helping him. Granted he gets to go to the toilet when he pleases. Yes he could find something else but this job pays our bills and allows me to work part time until our youngest starts school. That's reality unfortunately and I look forward to the day he can walk out and not look back but for now he's doing everything he can for us, his family. That's the real world.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Carbink View Post
    Children don't need to learn in very young age. I'd like to let them enjoy their childhood and make friends.
    I think we have some different definitions of "learning". Whilst young children should not be rushed into formalised learning they are learning all the time from the moment they are born. Ideally, the experiences provided to them facilitate and optimise this learning. Childcare can often provide experiences that facilitate this learning (that's not to say children that don't go to childcare are deprived in any way).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Unschooling4 View Post
    School is not the real world. Being stuck in a classroom with the same people, the same age as you and being forced to socialise with people you might not like, being forced to learn from a text book, asking permission to use the toilet. Ain't the real world.
    I removed my kids because of anxiety, behavior issues, bullying but i also removed them for a better life. So they can lead their own learning and education. So they are well rested and not stressed. I removed them for more family time.

    The OP asked what people thought about daycare. I answered.
    This has been a really interesting thread to read through. I know alot of posters have taken issue with this post and while I agree with them to a degree, I also think that for many kids school isn't like the 'real world' that they will enter after they finish high school.

    Yes, of course some people end up in jobs they don't like, etc. but there are also many people who are able to utilise their interests, passions and strengths to find a job/career they enjoy and thrive in. At school, the curriculum is much more prescribed and often children must complete tasks that are of no interest to them or tasks that are focused on areas of weakness (that can be avoided or overcome in the right job/career). I also think that, as adults, many people would be better equipped emotionally and cognitively to deal with the issues that they face in the workforce. Lots of children struggle in the main****** school system in Australia. The fact is that some just cannot cope - for these kids school isn't necessarily the 'real world' and when they are able to follow their strengths and passions some cope just fine in workplaces, etc. as adults.

    (Just wanted to add that I have no plan to homeschool/unschool my kids!)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Unschooling4 View Post
    School is not the real world. Being stuck in a classroom with the same people, the same age as you and being forced to socialise with people you might not like, being forced to learn from a text book, asking permission to use the toilet. Ain't the real world.
    actually that sounds suspiciously like work.

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    Quote Originally Posted by HollyGolightly81 View Post
    Most early childhood learning centers are child led and play-based, they are learning through play and interactions with others, not sitting down having the alphabet drilled into them.

    Last week was foresting week at my son's preschool to learn about autumn. They went for walks through the little forest in our local park, built a fort with sticks, collected chestnuts and leaves, etc. In his classroom there was a table with dirt and real vegetables like carrots and radishes to dig up and plant. Another table with dirt and leaves and animals. The children walk around freely and choose what tables they want to play at. That is learning when you are a preschool age child. It is also fun for them to have the opportunity to have these experiences and do things you may not think to do at home, with heaps of other children to build and navigate relationships with.
    .
    Yes! learning in early education is not being drilled in the alphabet. It's about learning by exposing kids to things they may not be exposed to at home. It can be as simple as learning to say 'pardon me' after doing a Gary (which not all parents do!) or as 'planned' as having your child participate in a tradition of another religion (dress, art, food etc).

    There is no way in heck I could cover what my kids educators do in a week. I just don't have the life experience (or time.. Or patience )

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    Quote Originally Posted by turquoisecoast View Post
    actually that sounds suspiciously like work.
    Yes. Unless an adult is going to live off the taxpayer they have to put up with some things they don't like. And sometimes ask to go to the loo too, depending on what job you're in. It's just what you have to do to pay the bills.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sajimum View Post
    This has been a really interesting thread to read through. I know alot of posters have taken issue with this post and while I agree with them to a degree, I also think that for many kids school isn't like the 'real world' that they will enter after they finish high school.

    Yes, of course some people end up in jobs they don't like, etc. but there are also many people who are able to utilise their interests, passions and strengths to find a job/career they enjoy and thrive in. At school, the curriculum is much more prescribed and often children must complete tasks that are of no interest to them or tasks that are focused on areas of weakness (that can be avoided or overcome in the right job/career). I also think that, as adults, many people would be better equipped emotionally and cognitively to deal with the issues that they face in the workforce. Lots of children struggle in the main****** school system in Australia. The fact is that some just cannot cope - for these kids school isn't necessarily the 'real world' and when they are able to follow their strengths and passions some cope just fine in workplaces, etc. as adults.

    (Just wanted to add that I have no plan to homeschool/unschool my kids!)
    I think this is a really well balanced post But I wanted to point out that even jobs you love and study for, have crappy parts to them. I know a few nurses who say they love the job, but they hate the paperwork. It's frustrating, repetitive and takes time from patient care. Likewise in the industry I studied in, the paperwork is insane. Pick any trade or occupation you can think of and I guarantee even people that love their job will say there are bits that are boring or frustrating.

    And in regard to some children not getting what they need from the main****** system. I agree with that, the system, public and private is not infallible. Teachers do try to cater to all different abilities in each subject area but of course it doesn't work for everyone. But having some experience with these types of kids, the answer isn't to remove them even more from main****** society. It's to attempt to better use what resources they have at their disposal and tweek it. These kids need more specialised and targeted assistance, not less, at home with well meaning but untrained parents who are well out of their depth. These kids already are on the fringe of 'normal'. Pushing them further out IMHO isn't the answer, it only seeks to alienate them more and put them further behind.

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