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  1. #11
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    DD didn't have much hair when she was young and was often mistaken for a boy up to about 18 months old. Only time it bothered me was if she was in e.g. pink tutu and people said 'what's his name' etc. Come on! It was generally only people without English as a first language or older people who said 'he'.

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    We've had it a few times with DS. He has a curly head of hair, and a very cheeky grin. It's normally in the form of "Oh isn't she gorgeous, how old is she?" I'd just answer the question, with out emphasising "He's 22 months (or whatever he was at the time)."
    It doesn't bother me in the slightest. We don't have a gender neutral pronoun in English, unless they say "they" or "it" people have to choose one. Not so long ago it was unacceptable to use "they" unless talking about a group, and people tend to get upset when you call their child/ren "it". 😂😂😂

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  4. #13
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    My kids have never been mistaken but I know someone that chose long hair for their son who has quite feminine features and would get annoyed. The first time I saw him, I really did think he was a girl. But then I actually believe she deliberately dressed him and had his hair in what society deems feminine, in order to be edgy and controversial (she has a lot of issues).

    Quote Originally Posted by rainbow road View Post
    Hasn't bothered me although it has only rarely happened - which I find interesting because DS wears a lot of very unisex clothes in bright colours. I have friends who get really annoyed by it!

    The kid I nannied for was 11 and always mistaken for a girl because of his long hair. Never bothered him much!
    I'm surprised you get that TBH. He certainly looks like a (very gorgeous ) boy to me, if I saw him at the supermarket I would automatically think boy.

    Some people are just weird.

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    when my ds started daycare an educator called him she a couple of times. his name ends in an a and he was wearing a bonds zippy that had some pink in it. I corrected her twice and it hasn't happened again. he's 6 months old.

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    It does bother me a little though I know it shouldn't. My ds has long hair and even though most of his clothes are sterotypically boyish people still sometimes call him a girl. I don't go out of my way to correct them. Sometimes I worry it might confuse him as he's only 2.5.

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    DD gets it. Probably because her name is unisex/more masculine and we don't always dress her in pink.
    I don't mind as it is an honest mistake. But I do always correct them with 'her' or 'she'

    My whole life growing up people would mispronounce my name and I would always let it slide and it work irk me that I was 'too polite' to correct them!

    Since having a child I feel like my filter has eased a bit!! So I'm a lot quicker to correct people (on both accounts!)

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    My eldest DD is often called he, she is 3 in December and picks her own clothes most of which are quite neutral also she has thick ringlets all over her head which are very slow growing. I think it important to not make a deal of genders and idealise what is for boys or girls and with her clothes I love she is establishing her own identity and hope it installs confidence so if it doesn't bother her it doesn't bother me such a minor detail imo.

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    Default Do people get your child's s.ex wrong? Do you care? Do you correct them?

    Hasn't happened with DS2 but DS1 used to have long curly hair until about 2.5yrs old and even though he was dressed very "boyish" (shorts, pants, shirt), I did sometimes get people commenting on what a pretty girl he was. I can't remember if I ever bothered correcting but it wouldn't bother me..

    Ds1 before his hair cut.. The curls never grew back

    .ImageUploadedByThe Bub Hub1474363614.226274.jpg
    Last edited by witherwings; 20-09-2016 at 19:27.

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  11. #19
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    My eldest gets mistaken for a boy. She is almost 2 and barely has any hair. She dresses fairly girly. It's generally Asian people that get it wrong. They ask "How old is he?". Doesn't bother me too much. I do reply with "SHE'S" blah blah

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    Quote Originally Posted by witherwings View Post
    Hasn't happened with DS2 but DS1 used to have long curly hair until about 2.5yrs old and even though he was dressed very "boyish" (shorts, pants, shirt), I did sometimes get people commenting on what a pretty girl he was. I can't remember if I ever bothered correcting but it wouldn't bother me..

    Ds1 before his hair cut.. The curls never grew back

    .Attachment 84439
    Omg @witherwings, what a gorgeous boy!

    I'm afraid my DS's curls might not grow back too if i cut his hair..

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