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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by gingermillie View Post
    This is a good point. I was talking to a friend last week who wasn't allowed any junk as a child. As soon as he got a job and moved out he went crazy. He ended up in a state of drinking 5L of coke a day and eating McDonald's etc every day. Weight ballooned of course and he was unhealthy for ages. Now in his 40s he tries to stay away from that stuff but still finds it really hard to control sweet intake and will demolish a whole block of chocolate, or a whole jar of Nutella in one sitting. So I do think there is some value in not 'with holding' and perhaps making it an option and role modeling healthy consumption so kids have experience having a bit and being able to regulate and say no. Not 100% sure on how to achieve this.
    On the flip side, I was allowed to eat copius amounts of junk food...and continued those habits until I moved in with DH, someone who was denied a lot and never 'rebelled.' My parent's were strict with fizzy and cordial etc, and I never rebelled. I think it's much more complex than just moderation.

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Full House View Post
    On the flip side, I was allowed to eat copius amounts of junk food...and continued those habits until I moved in with DH, someone who was denied a lot and never 'rebelled.' My parent's were strict with fizzy and cordial etc, and I never rebelled. I think it's much more complex than just moderation.
    I think there's a happy medium between completely withholding and being allowed to eat 'copious' amounts of junk food. I grew up in a house where there was always a 2L bottle of coke in the fridge and I could have as much as I wanted from a very young age (I drank soft drink every day growing up as that's just what we did) and I was sent to school with packets of chips for lunch. Luckily as an adult I eat pretty healthy and always have but I do think it was luck more than design.

  3. #53
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    Default Juice and other drinks for kids

    I think the key is withholding junk/processed/fast food until your child develops a great healthy eating habit and just using the occasional sweet or junk food for what it's supposed to be for - a sometimes food - for me that was being really strict on DS until he was about 3 ( no packet or processed foods) then I introduced dessert occasionally, lemonade at restaurants, sweets at parties etc never offering them as a reward or making a big deal out of them so not restricting but just not eating it at home where he has 80% of his meals and most importantly him seeing DH and I eating and enjoying fresh, whole foods - my sister did this with her now 13 year old as did my friends with nearly 20 year olds, none of these kids would even dream of eating food like McDonald's as a) it tastes like crap because they are used to better quality food and b) they know it's really bad for you , DH ate really badly in his teens and 20,s as his parents used to "treat" them McDonalds ever Friday night and always ate packet food and drank cordial at home so he didn't know any better - if they eat healthy 80% of the time and are active and brush their teeth the odd juice or lemonade or lollies at parties won't be a big deal

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  5. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Full House View Post
    My kids don't live in a bubble, and my reasons for no juice/soft drink/cordial have nothing to do with their teeth. Interestingly, I always feel I need to justify my reasons irl due to people judging me when my kids decline a popper at a party, or I say no if asked on their behalf. It would be nice if people wouldn't automatically think that a parent is keeping their kids in a bubble (or being over the top, or whatever other judgements may go through people's heads) because they have rules about what they can and can't drink.
    You certainly don't need to justify your decisions to me, they work for you and they are your kids I suppose this kind of highlights the point I was making in regards to the disconnect between RL and the forum. You feel judged in RL. I feel that on the forum it's those that do give sugar that are judged.

    I have one child going into high school another going into upper primary. I'm not questioning your motives (which I believe are entirely good) or decisions. I'm just pointing out that when they are young it's easy to control every thing they eat.

    You were fed junk food, your DH wasn't and didn't rebel. I had a very controlling parent in every aspect including food. I did rebel and still to this day associate junk food with rewarding myself. We each are making decisions based on our own experiences. I believe being overly controlling leads to kids not developing their own control over food and making junk food taboo. You had a different experience and are therefore parenting based on that are parenting differently. Which is perfectly fine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by gingermillie View Post
    I think there's a happy medium between completely withholding and being allowed to eat 'copious' amounts of junk food. I grew up in a house where there was always a 2L bottle of coke in the fridge and I could have as much as I wanted from a very young age (I drank soft drink every day growing up as that's just what we did) and I was sent to school with packets of chips for lunch. Luckily as an adult I eat pretty healthy and always have but I do think it was luck more than design.
    Completely agree. There is a huge space in between no sugar and junk food, and heaps of it. We eat tonnes of fresh fruit and veg and good quality protein. I just don't see the harm in a little bit of sugar here and there as long as a big majority of the diet is good.

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  8. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Full House View Post
    My kids don't live in a bubble, and my reasons for no juice/soft drink/cordial have nothing to do with their teeth. Interestingly, I always feel I need to justify my reasons irl due to people judging me when my kids decline a popper at a party, or I say no if asked on their behalf. It would be nice if people wouldn't automatically think that a parent is keeping their kids in a bubble (or being over the top, or whatever other judgements may go through people's heads) because they have rules about what they can and can't drink.
    This is exactly how I feel. Ever since my kids started solids I'm constantly having to defend our choice to not let them eat sugary food or drinks. The judgement is just unbelievable. I'm not judging anyone else but always feel like I have to justify our children's "strict" diet. Since when did healthy eating, and not allowing food or drinks that have absolutely no nutritional value, translate to keeping kids in a bubble? What they do when they are adults is their choice, but while they are young enough for me to decide, I just will not let them have cordial, lollies, jelly, or any other artificial thing that is pretty much 100% sugar..

    We made a "big fuss" about this with our childcare centre director. At first they were very resistant and tried to explain away their horrible menu, but we simply said that our children will not be allowed "x/y/z" from their menu and asked them to treat this request the same way the approach allergies, and in a short amount of time, they had a dietician come in and completely overhaul the food they served. Now instead of jelly and custard and gelato for dessert, the children eat banana and Greek yoghurt, fruit and crackers, etc.

    I'm not judging other parents, at all. I'm just thankful that DH and i are on the same page about our kids nutrition. We give them sweet things, they'll have a banana bread to share once a week at a cafe, they have some sugar in their daily porridge, they eat fruit all the time, they eat birthday cake at parties.. But that's the limit.

    I'm just so annoyed that i have to explain myself or that I'm told my kids are living in a bubble.

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    can you imagine a bunch of kids after custard and jelly... All together!?!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Olive Oil View Post
    can you imagine a bunch of kids after custard and jelly... All together!?!
    Tell me about it!

    The dietician told them to include kangaroo burgers into the menu once every 4 weeks and parents lost their freakin minds! The director had to send an email to everyone to explain the health benefits of kangaroo and stated if anyone still objected, they can request that their child has the vegetarian option that day. Seriously! They don't bat an eyelid at jelly and custard but heaven forbid the kids eat some lean protein!

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    Default Juice and other drinks for kids

    It's so hard. I actually filled my 10yo ds water bottle with weak cordial on Friday as he'd had a temp over 39 for 24hrs and was refusing to drink water. Not ideal but I made that call that it was better than not drinking.

    I have been so strict with my kids and food with mixed results - DS a great eater, DD a disaster. What I have found though is by being so strict at home, DS in particular is "that kid" at parties that sees the chips and lollies and goes back more times than everyone else and borderline piggy. I get judged for this behaviour, I got judged for being so strict. You cannot win.
    Last edited by ICanDream; 20-09-2016 at 07:59.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elijahs Mum View Post
    I think the key is withholding junk/processed/fast food until your child develops a great healthy eating habit and just using the occasional sweet or junk food for what it's supposed to be for - a sometimes food - for me that was being really strict on DS until he was about 3 ( no packet or processed foods) then I introduced dessert occasionally, lemonade at restaurants, sweets at parties etc never offering them as a reward or making a big deal out of them so not restricting but just not eating it at home where he has 80% of his meals and most importantly him seeing DH and I eating and enjoying fresh, whole foods - my sister did this with her now 13 year old as did my friends with nearly 20 year olds, none of these kids would even dream of eating food like McDonald's as a) it tastes like crap because they are used to better quality food and b) they know it's really bad for you , DH ate really badly in his teens and 20,s as his parents used to "treat" them McDonalds ever Friday night and always ate packet food and drank cordial at home so he didn't know any better - if they eat healthy 80% of the time and are active and brush their teeth the odd juice or lemonade or lollies at parties won't be a big deal
    I really like the taste of McDonalds.

    My parents weren't strict or lax with food but looking back parents of today would think there was too much junk. And I'm not the healthiest but more because I'm an emotional and boredom eater and hate exercise and exercise was never a thing when we were growing up.

    Everything in moderation.

    I'm the opposite in that I get criticism for my kids eating too much processed food and sugar and hardly any veggies - well hardly anything for that matter. A lot of this is to do with multiple allergies and CMPI in my kids - it has made them fussy, and they're probably fussy by nature too, so on the flip side all of these I don't give sugar or juice or anything out of a packet really hits me where it hurts.

    Oh to have kids who didn't have any dietary restrictions and were naturally not fussy!!

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