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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kaybaby View Post
    I would be more concerned about her social/emotional development than anything.
    I guess that's part of the reason why I'm exploring the idea - because socially she is spending more time with the grade 4s. She has one good grade 3 friend so far but just doesn't seem to click with most of the grade 3s (not helped by the fact that there are less grade 3 girls than grade 4 girls).

    I suppose it just seems 'easy' that she could just continue on with the kids she has spent this year with, doing the same work as them (as she has been most of the year so far) and so on. Whereas the other extension options all require special caterings and adjustments just for her.

    I'm sort of thinking out loud here (out typed?) just trying to sort through my ideas about it.

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    I can only speak from experience, but I never had a problem skipping a grade. I wouldn't say I was exceptionally bright or anything, but I always did well academically. I was sports captain in the grade I skipped to, so physically I never had an issue.

    I was moved up to year 1 half way through pre primary. Then after year 4 we moved to London and due to miscommunication my new school put me back in year 4. After the end of the first day I had a meeting with the head of school and my parents and was asked whether I wanted to stay in yr 4 or move up to yr 5, I elected to stay as I had already made friends. When we moved back to Australia 2 yrs later (to a brand new school altogether), I didn't have an option and they skipped me up again. So I ended up completing the rest of school with the yr group older than me and was 16 when I started uni.

    it honestly was never a big deal for me at all. I enjoyed school both with my own yr group and the yr above me as well. The only way it effected my life at all was that all my friends could go clubbing a lot earlier than me after finishing school.

    i guess on reflection I also struggled with choosing a uni degree, having zero clue what career path I wanted. I ended up completing the degree I chose but went back again and have just completed another one last yr. the first one was a waste for me, and I probably shouldn't have done it. Maybe I was a little too young to be choosing?

  3. #13
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    Is skipping even an option in your school area? I haven't heard of it happening for anyone who wasn't literally a genius (2 yrs + ahead). Might be worth asking before losing too much time thinking about it...if not an option can look at ways to keep your DD engaged at school...

  4. #14
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    My son skipped prep, he is in grade 6 this year, at the age of three he taught himself to read and write so I guess he was a few years ahead. While my son copes fine with the work, there are a few cracks for him socially. My son has an ASD so this may have been the case regardless of age. However if I could do it over I don't think I would skip him.


    My daughter has not skipped a year but we moved interstate to where they started school older than where we had come from, she is in year 11 this year. So my daughter is up to a year younger than most of her class mates. She is mature and gets along fine with people of all ages however I think sometimes in these teenage years that she is having to deal with certain things before she should be. So for that reason I wished I had put her in a classed based on age.

  5. #15
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    My DD skipped grade 4.
    She was reading chapter books by the time she started prep and a wisc test placed her at gifted (just). Naplan was interesting as she did it two years in a row (3&5) and both were top band in most things, above average in all.
    She's in yr7 now, where they've placed her in the advanced program and she is still thriving.
    It's my understanding that in VIC skipping is at the principals discretion?

  6. #16
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    I'm in a similar position with DS and although DD is only in prep she is well ahead of her peers. I'd be reluctant to consider skipping a grade because of the impact on the relationships with their classmates and that they would younger than others when completing school (but that's not to say it's not a valid option for some). The school does do things to assist in extending them (eg they both attend a year higher for spelling and some maths classes) and where possible their teachers will give them more challenging tasks than the rest of the class. (Having said this DS is complaining that the maths class is still too easy and boring.) I plan on having a chat with the school in the coming weeks to talk about what we can expect of the school to optimise DS and DD's education.

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    Your DD sounds a lot like my DS and he too hangs with the older kids and always has (is in 3/4 class). Personally I wouldn't skip if it was even an option unless they were the full picture - so everything 12mths ahead, no social issues - everything would have to be aligned. Sometimes it's the smaller things they will get from being within their peer group and refreshing the basics that is more important than skipping ahead

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    I had discussions with the school over grade skipping DS (he is a Jan birthday & due to social/emotional development reasons plus an extremely small size) he was held back despite being ready academically. This means he is the 2nd oldest in his grade.

    In the end, the reasons for me starting him late still stood. So it was decided that while in maths he has been completing secondary school work for a couple of years now (in grade 6, going into SEAL next year) and literacy also well ahead (NAPLAN last year was in the arrow across the board) on balance he didn't have all he needed to grade skip (we were also looking at skipping grade 4). I am very happy with the decision. He has had leadership roles within the school (is school captain this year), he is running a maths tutoring group for younger kids under supervision, excels in the sports he plays & gets along well with his peers. Last year he mainly played with grade 6s. He has easily transitioned this year to playing with those in his grade.

    A part of my decision cam from personal experience. I was grade skipped, and was already one of the youngest, being a late March birthday. I was nearly 2 years younger than many of my peers and in secondary school in particular struggled. There were issues that compounded the problems but I do feel that my lack of maturity was a major contributing factor to me going completely off the rails and by 14 not living at home, taking drugs, regularly writing myself off binge drinking, self harming and parasuicidal behaviour and the development of what to this day is a severe personality disorder. While obviously the issues were more complex than just grade skipping, I often do wonder if being with other teens more in my maturity level would have made a difference. FWIW a friend's daughter who sounds similar to your DD though more academically advanced who was grade skipped & went into SEAL is displaying similar issues to what I did at 15 without the abuse background that I came from.

    I would also suspect that the school would not see it as an option with where you have described her being at. Instead I would be looking to the school to see how they are going to keep her engaged & challenged.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by pointless1 View Post
    In the end, the reasons for me starting him late still stood. So it was decided that while in maths he has been completing secondary school work for a couple of years now (in grade 6, going into SEAL next year) and literacy also well ahead (NAPLAN last year was in the arrow across the board) on balance he didn't have all he needed to grade skip (we were also looking at skipping grade 4). I am very happy with the decision. He has had leadership roles within the school (is school captain this year), he is running a maths tutoring group for younger kids under supervision, excels in the sports he plays & gets along well with his peers. Last year he mainly played with grade 6s. He has easily transitioned this year to playing with those in his grade.
    It's interesting however I suspect it may be more the 'overactive mind' and 'sensitivities' that often come with being academically bright or gifted that could be a greater contributing factor to MI and the grade skipping correlates (rather than causes). I believe they have done a number of studies that show people with higher IQ have a greater proportion with MI. I think certainly that academically brighter kids on the whole do need more emotional support regardless of their year level.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by mmaf View Post
    My DD skipped grade 4.
    She was reading chapter books by the time she started prep and a wisc test placed her at gifted (just). Naplan was interesting as she did it two years in a row (3&5) and both were top band in most things, above average in all.
    She's in yr7 now, where they've placed her in the advanced program and she is still thriving.
    It's my understanding that in VIC skipping is at the principals discretion?
    I believe that's correct, thanks for sharing your experience as it is the same year level etc. Can I ask why she had WISC testing? Was this at your request or the school's suggestion?

    Quote Originally Posted by Busy-Bee View Post
    I'm in a similar position with DS and although DD is only in prep she is well ahead of her peers. I'd be reluctant to consider skipping a grade because of the impact on the relationships with their classmates and that they would younger than others when completing school (but that's not to say it's not a valid option for some). The school does do things to assist in extending them (eg they both attend a year higher for spelling and some maths classes) and where possible their teachers will give them more challenging tasks than the rest of the class. (Having said this DS is complaining that the maths class is still too easy and boring.) I plan on having a chat with the school in the coming weeks to talk about what we can expect of the school to optimise DS and DD's education.
    Quote Originally Posted by ICanDream View Post
    Your DD sounds a lot like my DS and he too hangs with the older kids and always has (is in 3/4 class). Personally I wouldn't skip if it was even an option unless they were the full picture - so everything 12mths ahead, no social issues - everything would have to be aligned. Sometimes it's the smaller things they will get from being within their peer group and refreshing the basics that is more important than skipping ahead
    Only being at the school since the start of this year, none of her friendship bonds are as strong as they may be if she'd been with the group since prep. She is tall and as already mentioned, looks set to hit puberty well ahead of most girls her age. I was my adult height by 13 years old, I always felt incredibly awkward and would cop some flak for being tall and gangly.

    Maths is her clear strength and she isn't necessarily bored (she's good at making even the most droll task fun) but she is commenting a lot about how what they are doing is easy and that she doesn't see why the grade 4s don't 'get' it. She just grasps concepts very rapidly.

    I'm not losing sleep over this, but I've been doing some reading because a) I'm a geek myself and love a bit of academic research, and b) this is useful stuff for me as a teacher as I'm sure I'll have this come up during my career as well. I found this interesting report on the way Victorian schools manage gifted students. It paints a pretty bleak picture in the primary years (and it does reflect what I've seen in classes - it's mainly up to the teacher and a few are great at it but many are not). Interestingly they say "Concerningly, the evidence presented to this Inquiry suggests some educators may be highly resistant to interventions that have been proven effective, particularly early entry to primary school and year level acceleration. " (p.xxv) and that "The Committee considers that educators’ concerns about the impact of year level acceleration on a child’s social and emotional development are not borne out by the literature in this area." (p.117). Page 116 and 117 include some interesting references and anecdotes that indicate the 'social' impact evidence is quite mixed, but not a blanket negative. Here's the full report for my fellow teachers/geeks:

    http://www.parliament.vic.gov.au/ima...nal_Report.pdf

    I don't think DD is profoundly gifted but I do suspect that her end of year report will see her creeping more than 12 months ahead as she has really found her stride at her new school and in our new community. Being rural, she can potentially apply for an early driver's license as well which would even things out come end of school as well.

    Whatever age my kids are, if they want to go to university I will be steering them strongly towards deferring their first year of uni to work full time and get some 'real world' experience before they start. I actually think 16-18 is too young for almost anyone to decide on what course they want to rack up tens of thousands of dollars worth of debt for and will probably suggest, unless they are absolutely certain, to just leave it and apply mature age in a few years.


 

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