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  1. #1
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    Default Do your kids go to a small school?

    I mean, really small. We are considering moving rural, which we would love. The only thing that really holds me back is schooling/social life for the kids.

    So for those with kids at tiny schools, or central/state schools, what is it like? Pros/cons?

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    My son is enrolled in a big school (starting next year) but we almost moved into an area with a much smaller school and were excited for him to start there. There's a lot of benefits to a small school. How old are you kids? I think in primary school they don't need a huge social circle. In my opinion, it's m more important that they have more personalised care from teachers, and aren't "left behind" as might happen in a big school.

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    Quote Originally Posted by witherwings View Post
    My son is enrolled in a big school (starting next year) but we almost moved into an area with a much smaller school and were excited for him to start there. There's a lot of benefits to a small school. How old are you kids? I think in primary school they don't need a huge social circle. In my opinion, it's m more important that they have more personalised care from teachers, and aren't "left behind" as might happen in a big school.
    I agree, I am not a fan of huge schools either. My girls are 4 and 2, so we are hoping to be settled somewhere before DD1 starts primary (2018). Such a big decision!

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    I did year 5/6 at a small rural school and they were the best school years of my life!! It was amazing! There were less than 50 kids in the whole school and 7 in my year. All the classes were composite classes with excellent teachers. I still keep in touch with a lot of people from there almost 20 years later!

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    My kids primary school had 260 kids, which was/is perfect. It's small enough to be intimate, the classes are all composites (which I like...the kids learn in stages), but it's big enough that they don't need to get stuck being friends with kids who aren't really friends.
    On the other hand, I have three lots of friends who had kids in three different small schools (100 odd kids), who have all had issues with their kids socially as there's no one else for their kid to play with when they're fighting with their friends (and it's inevitable, playground politics are unavoidable).
    They're my experiences. I would prefer a small school over a really large school, but I can see how stressful it is for my friends who's kids are at a really small school and dealing with their kids who are a bit stuck socially. If my options were really small school over large school, I'd go large school and keep an eye on my child's learning, volunteer in class, and keep in regular contact with the teacher so my child wasn't 'lost' in the system.
    Last edited by Full House; 13-09-2016 at 07:55.

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    My son goes to a K-12 school that has 22 kids. It's amazing and I love it so much. Everyone is friends with everyone so he gets plenty of social interaction with a mix of people. The K-2 class is about 7 kids or so I think, so they really get a lot of attention.
    I honestly can't imagine sending my kids anywhere else for their primary years. The senior has its own cons though, like not as many subjects, but we are keeping an open mind about that.

    Our school kids go off to the next over town (2 hours away) every second Friday to do little athletics with the kids there. School excursions are really intimate and more like a family outing as everyone is really close.

    Bullying gets stamped out immediately. Like I mean immediately. There is no way it doesn't get picked up on here.

    Really, I just can't recommend it enough.

    I have a son with autism who is due to start next year. I haven't had a single problem that everyone else seems to have with sending their ASD children to school.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Full House View Post
    My kids primary school had 260 kids, which was/is perfect. It's small enough to be intimate, the classes are all composites (which I like...the kids learn in stages), but it's big enough that they don't need to get stuck being friends with kids who aren't really friends.
    On the other hand, I have three lots of friends who had kids in three different small schools (100 odd kids), who have all had issues with their kids socially as there's no one else for their kid to play with when they're fighting with their friends (and it's inevitable, playground politics are unavoidable).
    They're my experiences. I would prefer a small school over a really large school, but I can see how stressful it is for my friends who's kids are at a really small school and dealing with their kids who are a bit stuck socially. If my options were really small school over large school, I'd go large school and keep an eye on my child's learning, volunteer in class, and keep in regular contact with the teacher so my child wasn't 'lost' in the system.
    I don't have any direct experience but was recently talking to a country teacher who worked at the bigger school in town (still small 200 enrolments) and she said the same thing about the nearby smaller school with only 50 kids. She said that if a kid just doesn't quite fit in or is struggling with friendships it's amplified in such a small group and they often get moved to the bigger schools where they can blend in more and have more opportunities to make friends.
    I was discussing this with her in the context that I was thinking about a school for my DD which currently only has 30 enrolments. I'm just not sure how effectively a group can be taught appropriately for their level when the couple of teachers have to constantly shift their focus over such broad capability levels. We've decided on different schooling unless that school lifts enrolments and we are in metro Adelaide so luckily have a lot of choice.

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    We looked at a school with only 50 children in it at present. It looked like an amazing school with a lot to offer but my downfall was my girls would all be in the same classes (4 children). I love that my girls are friends but I feel they need to make their own bonds with their own friends. We ended up choosing a school with 270 kids in it, best decision we have made for their education and social skills. They came from a school with 900 children which was out of control to the new school and they have improved in so many aspects of life and education.

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    My kids go to a primary school in the suburbs that has hit 100 enrolments for the first time this year.
    It's great and has a real family, country feel and a much slower pace overall than previous larger primary schools my eldest had attended.

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    We moved to the country last year and DD starts school next year. Her school has only 22 students this year, will have slightly more this year (28-ish I believe, only 6 preps, including her). I've spoken to others in the area who either sent their kids there or know someone who did, and have only heard really good things about it. DD and I visited the school and it has a great feel to it. She has already made a friend with a little girl who's in prep this year. I guess every child is different, but I think that DD will suit this school. She finished cancer treatment 5 months ago and is still growing her hair back, so she gets stared at a lot by other kids. I assume they are confused and can't figure out if she's a boy wearing girls clothes, or a girl with short hair? I worry that she would get picked on in a big school. The students at the little rural school seemed very caring and close to each other, which will suit DD perfectly. Her daycare was very much like that and she thrived.


 

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