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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blessedwith3boys View Post
    Here in WA my child was to start kindy the year he turned 4 and pre-primary the year he turned 5. That's how it is, so I didn't determine they were ready or start them early. They started when they were expected too! Who am I to hold them back by making the decision they aren't ready? If a teacher thinks otherwise they will let a parent know.
    So you can only send them turning 5 and not 6? I don't know the WA system. If you can send them 6, then sending them at 6 is sending them when they are expected to as well? In NSW those born Jan- July can be sent turning 5 or 6. Some choose to send them at 4.5, some at 5.5. Both are within the guidelines and are left up to parents.

    I don't see it as 'holding them back'. I see it as exercising the movement I have to send them at 5 or 6 and deciding 6. You exercised your judgment to send at 5. Every teacher I've discussed the topic with, both personally for my kids and professionally as a pre service teacher, has clearly said they support later starts.

    Only on BH, where parents who make a decision which falls into line with research all over the world are criticised lol

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  3. #42
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    This topic stresses me out since we are currently in the London and most children start at 4, if they're birthday falls right before the school year starts (so have only just turned 4) then they can be kept back a year. But, if like my DS, they are 4.5 when the school year starts then they have to start. We can delay a term but he would just be put in the class he was meant to start the term before. Kids here are kept with their age rather than the actual school year they are ready for, so if we somehow kept him back until he was turning six he would just get put in year 1. I am genuinely hoping we move back to Melbourne before he is due to start school as I would much rather him start right before he turns 6 rather than 4.5 (he's a Feb baby so our choices in melb would be right before 5 or right before 6), but who knows if we'll be back. I hate the idea of him starting 'big school' so young, especially when research shows it is best for them to start later.

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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    Bc I believe most children are not ready at 4 turning 5, particularly boys. I think Australia has it all wrong with starting age and I would like us to take the lead of many European countries and start at 6 turning 7 with a 2 year pre school program. Also doing the primary ed course has also made me realise how much we expect from such small children.

    I also believe that some parents tell themselves their kids are ready when they aren't bc for various reasons they want them at school. Of course some *are* ready, but some really aren't. And the teachers or school are then blamed for the child struggling.

    Obviously this is my opinion.
    I could not agree more with this post.

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    Del: from the comment of yours that cheese just quoted above...

    I have a friend here who's little boy JUST turned 4 in August, so she could have delayed sending him to school until next year rather than starting this past week. They are also actually moving to the states next month so you would think she wouldn't start him due to his age plus the major life change of having to move him in a month's time and the fact that school in the US doesn't start until 5 turning 6 or 6....

    But she's started him because she wants a break for 6 weeks .

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    I say it ALL the time on here - legally, in Australia, we are required to send our children to school by the year they turn 6. Whether the parent chooses to send them at 4 turning 5, or 5 turning 6 is up to parent, and usually have an option of either, depending on the cut off date - neither is 'sending them early' or 'holding them back', it is making a valid choice between two options, based on what is best for your child, and hopefully armed with information from preschool teachers.

    I am an Early Childhood teacher with experience working in preschool programs in long day care centres, in sessional preschools, and in teaching the first year of school. I can say with 100% confidence that in SA at least, there is a HUGE difference in a long day care preschool and in a sessional preschool. They are such entirely different settings, with such different purposes, that you just cannot compare the two. That being said, I dont think the type of preschool attended really makes a huge difference when the child starts school - I have taught children in prep who have attended day care, preschool, or nothing at all (stayed home with mum), & they all adjust really quickly to the expectations of school.

    I wil always choose to send my child closer to age 6 than to age 4 - just because of my experience and knowlege of school readiness. I think in years to come, Australia will see the success of other countries who start kids at school around age 6-7, & will follow suit. I hope so,anyway.

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    Default Kinder program in childcare if funding isn't approved?

    Quote Originally Posted by cheeeeesecake View Post
    I say it ALL the time on here - legally, in Australia, we are required to send our children to school by the year they turn 6. Whether the parent chooses to send them at 4 turning 5, or 5 turning 6 is up to parent, and usually have an option of either, depending on the cut off date - neither is 'sending them early' or 'holding them back', it is making a valid choice between two options, based on what is best for your child, and hopefully armed with information from preschool teachers.

    I am an Early Childhood teacher with experience working in preschool programs in long day care centres, in sessional preschools, and in teaching the first year of school. I can say with 100% confidence that in SA at least, there is a HUGE difference in a long day care preschool and in a sessional preschool. They are such entirely different settings, with such different purposes, that you just cannot compare the two. That being said, I dont think the type of preschool attended really makes a huge difference when the child starts school - I have taught children in prep who have attended day care, preschool, or nothing at all (stayed home with mum), & they all adjust really quickly to the expectations of school.

    I wil always choose to send my child closer to age 6 than to age 4 - just because of my experience and knowlege of school readiness. I think in years to come, Australia will see the success of other countries who start kids at school around age 6-7, & will follow suit. I hope so,anyway.
    Eta: never mind, I read your post wrong!!!
    Last edited by HollyGolightly81; 11-09-2016 at 20:43.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Theboys&me View Post
    I'm in QLD and had DS1 go through a stand alone C&K kindy that it attached to the school and a main feeder kindy.

    I had DS2 go to a C&K approved kindy in a day care setting just around the corner from the school.

    Both were run by qualified teachers, both of my boys are the younger students (born the year after many of their peers.)

    DS1 struggled a little in terms of behaviour in prep and year 1 but is fine now in year 3.

    DS2 adapted very quickly to the primary school. No issues.

    Both are high performing students and achieve higher results than their peers who were born the year before them.

    If I had my time again I'd have them both in the day care kindy that DS2 went to. There was a big staff turn around which was a negative, but the quality of experiences that DS2 has was far beyond DS1's. DS2 also learnt to operate as part of a larger centre and had to negotiate with a wider range of students at play times. I think DS1 would've benefited from that.

    I'm also a teacher at their current primary school. We don't advise parents to delay enrolment. Generally (and this is coming from me putting my year 6 teaching hat on rather than my year 1 hat) students who are kept down or delayed entry rarely have any advantage. Often the opposite occurs where I have the lowest performing students a year (or sometimes 2) older than their peers and they struggle with behavioural issues. This is based purely on my own anecdotal observations over 12 years of teaching.
    Very interesting. I've also read something similar about older peers being less motivated in high school.

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  11. #48
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    Default Kinder program in childcare if funding isn't approved?

    HG, I think the second paragraph is about the different types of preschool settings not mattering, not the school starting age? That's how I read it, anyway.

    ETA damn you and your ninja edits! *shakes fist*

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    Quote Originally Posted by HollyGolightly81 View Post
    Eta: never mind, I read your post wrong!!!
    I realised it wasnt clear, so also did a ninja edit 😀

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    Quote Originally Posted by harvs View Post
    HG, I think the second paragraph is about the different types of preschool settings not mattering, not the school starting age? That's how I read it, anyway.

    ETA damn you and your ninja edits! *shakes fist*


 

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