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  1. #31
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    Maybe it's just qld, but kindergarten programs in long daycare centre's are run by qualified teachers and there are no "toddlers" in those classes. It's ONLY made up of children attending school the following year.

    http://deta.qld.gov.au/earlychildhoo...-services.html

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  3. #32
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    It seems like there is a thread similar to this every week on bubhub. I wish the government would:
    1. Review the cut off age. Jan, April, June - what does the research say is the best cut off...?
    2. Make all states the same.
    3. Enforce the starting age unless there it is very clear evidence suggesting a child isn't ready to start.

    I wasn't concerned at all about my 30 June baby starting school when she was 4.5 until I stared reading these threads... In Vic/SA she wouldn't be allowed to start school at 4.5 but in Qld she has to. Something doesn't add up.

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  5. #33
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    Default Kinder program in childcare if funding isn't approved?

    I'm in QLD and had DS1 go through a stand alone C&K kindy that it attached to the school and a main feeder kindy.

    I had DS2 go to a C&K approved kindy in a day care setting just around the corner from the school.

    Both were run by qualified teachers, both of my boys are the younger students (born the year after many of their peers.)

    DS1 struggled a little in terms of behaviour in prep and year 1 but is fine now in year 3.

    DS2 adapted very quickly to the primary school. No issues.

    Both are high performing students and achieve higher results than their peers who were born the year before them.

    If I had my time again I'd have them both in the day care kindy that DS2 went to. There was a big staff turn around which was a negative, but the quality of experiences that DS2 has was far beyond DS1's. DS2 also learnt to operate as part of a larger centre and had to negotiate with a wider range of students at play times. I think DS1 would've benefited from that.

    I'm also a teacher at their current primary school. We don't advise parents to delay enrolment. Generally (and this is coming from me putting my year 6 teaching hat on rather than my year 1 hat) students who are kept down or delayed entry rarely have any advantage. Often the opposite occurs where I have the lowest performing students a year (or sometimes 2) older than their peers and they struggle with behavioural issues. This is based purely on my own anecdotal observations over 12 years of teaching.
    Last edited by Theboys&me; 11-09-2016 at 13:47.

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  7. #34
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    I'm curious how some parents determine their child isn't ready. And should the parent be able to delay their child starting kindy because of what they think?

    My 2 oldest boys were born in April and May so are towards the youngest in their classes. I wouldn't have thought I was qualified to determine whether or not they are ready, it wasn't something that even crossed my mind to be honest. I went with the flow, this is the year they start and that is that.
    Both have been fine and are above average students in pre-primary and year 3.

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  9. #35
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    kiwimum890 is offline It won't happen overnight, but it will happen!
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    Quote Originally Posted by babyno1onboard View Post
    It seems like there is a thread similar to this every week on bubhub. I wish the government would:
    1. Review the cut off age. Jan, April, June - what does the research say is the best cut off...?
    2. Make all states the same.
    3. Enforce the starting age unless there it is very clear evidence suggesting a child isn't ready to start.

    I wasn't concerned at all about my 30 June baby starting school when she was 4.5 until I stared reading these threads... In Vic/SA she wouldn't be allowed to start school at 4.5 but in Qld she has to. Something doesn't add up.
    I totally agree with point number 2!

    It is extremely confusing, I have no idea about schooling side of things yet as my children are still too young, however can I ask the very naive question why isn't it all the same, early childhood and schooling would be so much easier (especially for defence families or those who move a lot between states) if it was the same nationally, surely it is a disadvantage to have a curriculum that is different let alone the starting times for the learning...

    It is so confusing reading these threads it hurts my head! I wish it was all the same...

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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    Thanks for clarifying. Not trying to be argumentative I am just having flashbacks to the mum with a 3 month old bub who said they were going to delay solids until 8 months as that was what was best for bub. How can you know so far out?. Are we parenting to a child's needs? or parenting to a philosophical trend? Or parenting to a recommended guideline?
    Sometimes parents make decisions because they learn from their previous kids, new research coming out or because of their parental styles and values.

    I've got a June baby who could have started kindy (QLD) this year but as we've moved to the ACT can't start till next year. I'm happy with this as she isn't emotionally ready.

    Btwi did start my dd3 on solids at 8 mths. She sailed thru it wonderfully. Best decision I made. But then I'm only her mother ... How could I not know what she needed?

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  13. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blessedwith3boys View Post
    I'm curious how some parents determine their child isn't ready. And should the parent be able to delay their child starting kindy because of what they think?

    My 2 oldest boys were born in April and May so are towards the youngest in their classes. I wouldn't have thought I was qualified to determine whether or not they are ready, it wasn't something that even crossed my mind to be honest. I went with the flow, this is the year they start and that is that.
    Both have been fine and are above average students in pre-primary and year 3.
    Sending kids turning 5 isn't the default though. In fact in my experience in both the private and public system most parents send their kids turning 6, which is obviously within the rules. I don't need professional permission anymore than you did sending your kids early. How did you determine your boys were ready to go to school at 4 and should they be allowed to start early bc of what you think?

    See the irony here?

    I'm unsure how the WA system works, but here if the child turns 5 the school *must* take them. Just bc the child continues doesn't mean the school thinks they are ready.
    Last edited by delirium; 11-09-2016 at 17:32.

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  15. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Theboys&me View Post
    I'm in QLD and had DS1 go through a stand alone C&K kindy that it attached to the school and a main feeder kindy.

    I had DS2 go to a C&K approved kindy in a day care setting just around the corner from the school.

    Both were run by qualified teachers, both of my boys are the younger students (born the year after many of their peers.)

    DS1 struggled a little in terms of behaviour in prep and year 1 but is fine now in year 3.

    DS2 adapted very quickly to the primary school. No issues.

    Both are high performing students and achieve higher results than their peers who were born the year before them.

    If I had my time again I'd have them both in the day care kindy that DS2 went to. There was a big staff turn around which was a negative, but the quality of experiences that DS2 has was far beyond DS1's. DS2 also learnt to operate as part of a larger centre and had to negotiate with a wider range of students at play times. I think DS1 would've benefited from that.

    I'm also a teacher at their current primary school. We don't advise parents to delay enrolment. Generally (and this is coming from me putting my year 6 teaching hat on rather than my year 1 hat) students who are kept down or delayed entry rarely have any advantage. Often the opposite occurs where I have the lowest performing students a year (or sometimes 2) older than their peers and they struggle with behavioural issues. This is based purely on my own anecdotal observations over 12 years of teaching.
    In Queensland it has been much harder in the past to keep your child home another year and if you did, they went straight into year 1 and skip prep because it wasn't compulsory. I would imagine that would be the reason for your evidence over 12 years.

    I have experienced the opposite, younger child/ren more immature than their peers. I can pick them a mile away. I've been teaching almost 20 years.

    I think you're the first teacher I've known in 20 years who supports children starting formal schooling at age 4.5!

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  17. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    Sending kids turning 5 isn't the default though. In fact in my experience in both the private and public system most parents send their kids turning 6, which is obviously within the rules. I don't need professional permission anymore than you did sending your kids early. How did you determine your boys were ready to go to school at 4 and should they be allowed to start early bc of what you think?

    See the irony here?

    I'm unsure how the WA system works, but here if the child turns 5 the school *must* take them. Just bc the child continues doesn't mean the school thinks they are ready.
    Here in WA my child was to start kindy the year he turned 4 and pre-primary the year he turned 5. That's how it is, so I didn't determine they were ready or start them early. They started when they were expected too! Who am I to hold them back by making the decision they aren't ready? If a teacher thinks otherwise they will let a parent know.
    Last edited by Blessedwith3boys; 11-09-2016 at 18:38.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MrsSS View Post
    Here in Qld, if it is a Government funded kindergarten program at a daycare centre then the teacher/lead educator must be an ECT with a degree. Now I can't speak for "all" daycares, but my daughter's is structured and they have lessons as such as we'll as play based learning. I think that's incredibly important as they are only 4. Her class also only has 4-6yr olds, 3yr olds are in what we call senior kindy.
    This isn't entirely correct. A kindy teacher in a long daycare can be the ECT if they have finished a minimum of half their early childhood degree.


 

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