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  1. #21
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    I am genuinely confused about how differently it's run in each state, made apparent by threads such as this. Why on earth can't all the states be the same. How confusing.

    DS1 is in his 2nd year of kindy and is a late July baby, so *technically* old enough to have started prep this year in Qld (where we now, as if this year, have a July 30 cut off). He would have been 4.5 starting prep, far too young IMO. In other states he wouldn't have been allowed to start anyway, this is why I think it's so confusing. Why is it ok to start in qld but not Victoria etc. A 4.5 year old Qld child is no more mature than a 4.5 yr old Victorian child.

    My DS1 is in his 2nd year of kindy in an early learning centre, they have 2 kindy rooms with a proper kindergarten program run 9-3, but also a long day care facility, which is great for us working parents that can't be there at 3pm to pick them up. Rooms are strictly age based (2 kindy rooms and a junior kindy room) and the toddlers don't mix with the kindy kids. It's also attached to the (private) school and has an excellent transition program with the prep classes, the kindy kids do lots of activities with the prep children and teachers already. I don't think all daycare centres have such a good kindy program, we are very fortunate. But it doesn't really feel like a 'daycare centre' either, and that's partly why we chose it. It's very structured and children have PE (with the school PE teacher), Religious education, Library visits etc and set times for daily routines.

    Anyway not sure on the difference between states but I do think there are great early learning centres out there that offer exceptional kindy programs that are not a step backward at all. In saying that, I agree with other's opinions that too much changing around is likely counterproductive- if you opt to repeat kindergarten it would be better to do it at the same centre if possible (or one attached to the school they will attend for prep).

  2. #22
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    The "trend" of sending kids a year later is not just parents, it's schools. My child was an April baby so 2 weeks off the cusp and he's bright but every school i've enquired about has told me unless he's exceptionally mature, to send him the following year. So I'm doing private 3 year old Preschool and then formal preschool.

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  4. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clementine Grace View Post
    The "trend" of sending kids a year later is not just parents, it's schools. My child was an April baby so 2 weeks off the cusp and he's bright but every school i've enquired about has told me unless he's exceptionally mature, to send him the following year. So I'm doing private 3 year old Preschool and then formal preschool.
    Fair enough.
    My son will be assessed at kinder soon and unfortunately maturity isn't an area of concern in order to repeat kinder. They have to be delayed in certain areas.

  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2BlueBirds View Post
    Fair enough.
    My son will be assessed at kinder soon and unfortunately maturity isn't an area of concern in order to repeat kinder. They have to be delayed in certain areas.
    I get so confused with the different states. Where I am they have to be 4 by April 30 to start preschool and then 5 by April 30 for kindergarten. With public preschool/kindergarten its quite hard to repeat and they generally push them through, so people often do private preschool then a second year. Or at private schools, it's much easier to repeat. It's a pickle! My child is only 3.5 but my daycare has told us cognitively he's ready for preschool, he's apparently top of the group in his room and some are already 4, but he's not ready maturity wise and still needs to build more social skills. So we've opted for a private preschool next year where he can do 2 years.

    It's so different in every state though.

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  7. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    On the whole pre school vs daycare school program (I'm in NSW). I personally believe pre school is vastly better. Here pre school teachers have early childhood degrees when child care workers don't. They are still more play based than kinder but far more geared towards school readiness. That's not running down DC centres or their workers, they do an amazing job. But for *my* kids, the year before proper school is always pre school.
    Here in Qld, if it is a Government funded kindergarten program at a daycare centre then the teacher/lead educator must be an ECT with a degree. Now I can't speak for "all" daycares, but my daughter's is structured and they have lessons as such as we'll as play based learning. I think that's incredibly important as they are only 4. Her class also only has 4-6yr olds, 3yr olds are in what we call senior kindy.

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  9. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    Bc I believe most children are not ready at 4 turning 5, particularly boys. I think Australia has it all wrong with starting age and I would like us to take the lead of many European countries and start at 6 turning 7 with a 2 year pre school program. Also doing the primary ed course has also made me realise how much we expect from such small children.

    I also believe that some parents tell themselves their kids are ready when they aren't bc for various reasons they want them at school. Of course some *are* ready, but some really aren't. And the teachers or school are then blamed for the child struggling.

    Obviously this is my opinion.
    I agree with everything you have said. All research points to this being the case. Steve Biddolph, a huge advocate for starting formal education late, is worth a read. As our prep teacher has said, she doesn't know anyone who has regretted holding their child back a year but plenty of parents that have regretted sending them too early. We will wait the extra year, and I know especially in Junior secondary, it will be to our sons advantage. Beyond that, who knows if he would have been ready, but it doesn't hurt to wait that extra time and allow them to be real kids for another year

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    delirium  (10-09-2016)

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    Default Kinder program in childcare if funding isn't approved?

    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    Bc I believe most children are not ready at 4 turning 5, particularly boys. I think Australia has it all wrong with starting age and I would like us to take the lead of many European countries and start at 6 turning 7 with a 2 year pre school program. Also doing the primary ed course has also made me realise how much we expect from such small children.

    I also believe that some parents tell themselves their kids are ready when they aren't bc for various reasons they want them at school. Of course some *are* ready, but some really aren't. And the teachers or school are then blamed for the child struggling.

    Obviously this is my opinion.
    Thanks for clarifying. Not trying to be argumentative I am just having flashbacks to the mum with a 3 month old bub who said they were going to delay solids until 8 months as that was what was best for bub. How can you know so far out?. Are we parenting to a child's needs? or parenting to a philosophical trend? Or parenting to a recommended guideline?
    Last edited by VicPark; 10-09-2016 at 21:41.

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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    Thanks for clarifying. Not trying to be argumentative I am just having flashbacks to the mum with a 3 month old bub who said they were going to delay solids until 8 months as that was what was best for bub. How can you know so far out?. Are we parenting to a child's needs? or parenting to a philosophy? Or parenting to a recommended guideline?
    I think maybe all of the above? Boys generally do not have the same level of maturity, impulse control and emotional intelligence as girls have. I believe there is a reason that there is such a wealth of research to show later starts are beneficial - bc they generally are. On the flipside I acknowledge there are kids who are ready early and they should be able to start early.

    But I think we are dancing around the point that you think I would hold my child back bc of my own beliefs/needs/philosophy rather than what suits my child - I'm not offended by that btw it's a valid point. But really, the same could be said for those that do send early. They do so to save money on DC/pre school. Bc they need a break, they need to increase hours at work. Bc they believe children should be independent.

    I believe that in most cases we start kids too early, the Dept of Ed places too many standards too early and that we have the whole notion of education and how to deliver it, completely wrong on a macro level. So while it is a belief, I also really do feel starting DS2 turning 6 is in his best interests.
    Last edited by delirium; 10-09-2016 at 22:07.

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    And Fearless and Mrsss thanks for clarifying. In NSW, (or at least in our area ??) the day cares run a school program but it is still run by DC workers, whereas the pre schools have Early Childhood teachers.

    There is so much inconsistencies between states, so confusing

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    Quote Originally Posted by sunnygirl79 View Post
    I am genuinely confused about how differently it's run in each state, made apparent by threads such as this. Why on earth can't all the states be the same. How confusing.

    DS1 is in his 2nd year of kindy and is a late July baby, so *technically* old enough to have started prep this year in Qld (where we now, as if this year, have a July 30 cut off). He would have been 4.5 starting prep, far too young IMO. In other states he wouldn't have been allowed to start anyway, this is why I think it's so confusing. Why is it ok to start in qld but not Victoria etc. A 4.5 year old Qld child is no more mature than a 4.5 yr old Victorian child.

    My DS1 is in his 2nd year of kindy in an early learning centre, they have 2 kindy rooms with a proper kindergarten program run 9-3, but also a long day care facility, which is great for us working parents that can't be there at 3pm to pick them up. Rooms are strictly age based (2 kindy rooms and a junior kindy room) and the toddlers don't mix with the kindy kids. It's also attached to the (private) school and has an excellent transition program with the prep classes, the kindy kids do lots of activities with the prep children and teachers already. I don't think all daycare centres have such a good kindy program, we are very fortunate. But it doesn't really feel like a 'daycare centre' either, and that's partly why we chose it. It's very structured and children have PE (with the school PE teacher), Religious education, Library visits etc and set times for daily routines.

    Anyway not sure on the difference between states but I do think there are great early learning centres out there that offer exceptional kindy programs that are not a step backward at all. In saying that, I agree with other's opinions that too much changing around is likely counterproductive- if you opt to repeat kindergarten it would be better to do it at the same centre if possible (or one attached to the school they will attend for prep).
    Reading through all of these threads of late I am confused too about the different systems, ages and names for things and wish it could at least be called the same!
    Similar to you my DDs childcare centre is split by age. It's an amazing centre with 5 completely separate 'houses' each with its own building and large outdoor area and yard - it's a huge property. They only have one intake at the start of the year (massive waiting lists so no ad hoc entrants and no moving mid-year) and kids only move up at the start of each year, the age groups are:
    Baby house (so under about 12 months at the start of the year when the intake started, DD was the youngest at 7 months)
    Toddler house (1.5-2.5 years)
    Middle house (2.5-3.5 years)
    Preschool/kindy house (3.5-4.5 years)
    Too old for kindy/too young for school house lol (4.5-5.5 years).
    DD is a July baby and we are in SA with the single January school intake so she will start school at 5 years 7 months. Barring any unforeseen things changing I imagine she will stay at childcare for kindy and then the extra year. The private school we are looking at pushes for kids to go to their ELC (of course ) but I'll wait til closer to decide. At the moment i would rather she stay where she is as I love the environment and she will have the same carer team for the whole 5 years as they move through the houses as a cohort which is amazing (and very low staff attrition).

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