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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by FearlessLeader View Post
    My DS is a Feb baby and we sent him at 4 turning 5. It has worked out fine for him, but in your case I think if you really believe he won't be ready, and he doesn't get funding then a kinder program in long day care setting would be fine. I agree with PP's that it may seem like a 'step backwards' but I guess weighing it up, a small step backwards seems like a better option than a huge leap forwards that he's not ready for.
    Fair points. One additional thing to consider night be how well a child copes with change. Going from a daycare, to a new preschool, back to a daycare, then to a new school all in 3 years - no way my little one would cope with all that change. For him, if the preschool was attached to a primary school and somewhat integrated he would cope better staying in that same environment.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FearlessLeader View Post
    Everyone I've met who have experienced both settings say there is a big difference. Being in a room with half the children barely out of toddlerhood is completely different to being in a room almost entirely made up of children going to school the following year, even if the programs are the same on paper. Activities need to be adjusted, many kids still need naps, staff have to spend time dealing with less mature children instead of solely focussing on school readiness. It's not the same at all.
    That's not a proper kindy program if that is the way it is being run. I'm a teacher and I chose the daycare option over council run based on the program, hours and reviews. We have two kindy rooms. One for all children going to school next year, and one for the year after. Of course some children need naps - council run kindys are no different, and I would be concerned if they didn't offer a scheduled rest time. Why do you automatically think less mature children attend a daycare kindy? I know that there are very immature children in both settings - thus the need for school readiness assessment often, and unfortunately there are still immature children who have toileting accidents in the first few years of formal school. I'm sure there are some less than ideal daycare kindys, as there are some less than ideal council run ones, but there are also some fantastic ones. Ours is a feeder into the local state and private school and the kindy teachers have developed a relationship with both principals - an important trust relationship when they are influential in the decision to move up to prep or wait another year. I don't think you can lump all in either the 'great' or 'not great' box. As with anything, do a walk through, chat to teachers and parents but don't make blanket assumptions based on other people's opinions

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  4. #13
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    Default Kinder program in childcare if funding isn't approved?

    Quote Originally Posted by 2BlueBirds View Post
    Vicpark it's the stigma. I'm so annoyed at some of the parents holding their kids back because the don't want them to be the youngest. If all parents went by the April cut off then it wouldnt be a problem because he would be amongst other kids turning 5 Jan-March/April, but it looks like other kids will be turning 6 making it more difficult for my child (I'm sure joining in play etc would be harder with 6 year olds as opposed to 5 year olds).
    I can't help but feel this bracket creep in starting school is more a fashion trend than a necessity. And before you know it the 'norm' has changed and those at the tail end (march babies) are damned if they do and damned if they don't. I don't buy the whole kids aren't ready for school at 5 thing. Preschool starts at 4 and that works. If kindy isn't working for 5 year olds it's because the programming isn't age appropriate not because the kids aren't ready.
    Last edited by VicPark; 10-09-2016 at 20:17.

  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2BlueBirds View Post
    Vicpark it's the stigma. I'm so annoyed at some of the parents holding their kids back because the don't want them to be the youngest. If all parents went by the April cut off then it wouldnt be a problem because he would be amongst other kids turning 5 Jan-March/April, but it looks like other kids will be turning 6 making it more difficult for my child (I'm sure joining in play etc would be harder with 6 year olds as opposed to 5 year olds).
    I highly suspect it's not so much about being the youngest chronologically, but they are concerned being the youngest will mean they are the least mature. If your child is ready then send them, if he isn't don't. You can't place blame on other parents not wanting to send their kids early. They probably believe their child isn't ready and they probably aren't.

    I don't think the answer is to make everyone send their kids early bc you want to. I'm genuinely not wanting to be awful - it's just I've seen this argument lots on here lately and it's illogical. Parents wanting to send their kids early are angry at other parents who don't, bc the latter child is going to be more mature/older. Isn't that really the answer to your question? If you don't believe your turning 5 yo is going to have the equivalent maturity than maybe the best thing is to do another year of preprep/pre school (I don't know what state you are in).

    You can't be annoyed at parents who are trying to do the best for their child, often at great financial expense, by sending their child turning 6 which is within the rules. My 3rd child is right around this time period too, so I could send him turning 5. But we will enrol him turning 6 bc I believe that's what's best for him. I can't be expected to send him early in order to make him the same age as the young ones

    Base your decision on your child and whether he will cope socially, emotionally, academically.
    Last edited by delirium; 10-09-2016 at 20:15.

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    Default Kinder program in childcare if funding isn't approved?

    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    . My 3rd child is right around this time period too, so I could send him turning 5. But we will enroll him turning 6 bc I believe that's what's best for him. I can't be expected to send him early in order to make him the same age as the young ones
    .
    how do you know that's best for your 3rd child - isn't he a baby still? In which case there's a long way to go before you know whether he will be ready to start at 5 or not?

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    On the whole pre school vs daycare school program (I'm in NSW). I personally believe pre school is vastly better. Here pre school teachers have early childhood degrees when child care workers don't. They are still more play based than kinder but far more geared towards school readiness. That's not running down DC centres or their workers, they do an amazing job. But for *my* kids, the year before proper school is always pre school.

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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    how do you know that's best for your 3rd child - isn't he a baby still? In which case there's a long way to go before you know whether he will be ready to start at 5 or not?
    Bc I believe most children are not ready at 4 turning 5, particularly boys. I think Australia has it all wrong with starting age and I would like us to take the lead of many European countries and start at 6 turning 7 with a 2 year pre school program. Also doing the primary ed course has also made me realise how much we expect from such small children.

    I also believe that some parents tell themselves their kids are ready when they aren't bc for various reasons they want them at school. Of course some *are* ready, but some really aren't. And the teachers or school are then blamed for the child struggling.

    Obviously this is my opinion.

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  12. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zander15 View Post
    That's not a proper kindy program if that is the way it is being run. I'm a teacher and I chose the daycare option over council run based on the program, hours and reviews. We have two kindy rooms. One for all children going to school next year, and one for the year after. Of course some children need naps - council run kindys are no different, and I would be concerned if they didn't offer a scheduled rest time. Why do you automatically think less mature children attend a daycare kindy? I know that there are very immature children in both settings - thus the need for school readiness assessment often, and unfortunately there are still immature children who have toileting accidents in the first few years of formal school. I'm sure there are some less than ideal daycare kindys, as there are some less than ideal council run ones, but there are also some fantastic ones. Ours is a feeder into the local state and private school and the kindy teachers have developed a relationship with both principals - an important trust relationship when they are influential in the decision to move up to prep or wait another year. I don't think you can lump all in either the 'great' or 'not great' box. As with anything, do a walk through, chat to teachers and parents but don't make blanket assumptions based on other people's opinions
    Er- of course it's a proper kindy- a 3 and 4 year old kinder program in a long day care centre exactly as the OP is considering for her child. That's who I'm speaking to, in regards to 3 year olds being in the same room as 4 and 5 year olds.
    I've worked in a lot of centres. I've worked in very few with a long day care for 4 year olds that don't spend time interacting with younger children, and none that have the same sort of structure and feel of a sessional kinder program. Despite being run by qualified kinder teachers, many of them and certainly most of the support staff have a day care mentality- they do things quite differently to a sessional kinder.
    It doesn't mean it's worse, in my opinion, just different. In fact I prefer it for my children as I feel one last year of being little before school is actually a good thing. As I said in a previous post, my DS adjusted really well to school. It's not about great vs not great, it's just about recognising that there ARE real differences.

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    Default Kinder program in childcare if funding isn't approved?

    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    On the whole pre school vs daycare school program (I'm in NSW). I personally believe pre school is vastly better. Here pre school teachers have early childhood degrees when child care workers don't. They are still more play based than kinder but far more geared towards school readiness. That's not running down DC centres or their workers, they do an amazing job. But for *my* kids, the year before proper school is always pre school.
    Del we're talking about a kinder/preschool program within a day care or a stand alone one- OP's long day care has a qualified kinder teacher (if I read correctly!)

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    Quote Originally Posted by FearlessLeader View Post
    My DS is a Feb baby and we sent him at 4 turning 5. It has worked out fine for him, but in your case I think if you really believe he won't be ready, and he doesn't get funding then a kinder program in long day care setting would be fine. I agree with PP's that it may seem like a 'step backwards' but I guess weighing it up, a small step backwards seems like a better option than a huge leap forwards that he's not ready for. DS attended a long day care program just like the one you have experienced- ages 3-5 and a lot less structured than a sessional kinder program. I don't think it makes a huge difference once they're all settled in to school.
    I've sent you a PM

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