+ Reply to Thread
Page 16 of 24 FirstFirst ... 61415161718 ... LastLast
Results 151 to 160 of 240
  1. #151
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    12,706
    Thanks
    9,557
    Thanked
    12,687
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 9/1/15Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 7/11/14Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 3/10/14100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    You're always saying you're a scientific/evidence based kinda person but you don't believe the numerous studies and other education and childhood experts.
    .
    I believe the studies in that they say kids aren't ready for whip-cracking style teaching until they are six (5 hours straight of PowerPoint slides etc). I just don't believe that translates into kids shouldn't start school until they are six. I believe that the kindy/prep program should be a little more relaxed.

  2. #152
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    my house
    Posts
    17,695
    Thanks
    1,391
    Thanked
    7,284
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    People have been sending their just about/newly turned 5 year old to school since day dot. It's been the norm for a long time not the exception and is within the guidelines set by the appropriate Education Department. If the kindy/prep program in certain states hasn't been suitable for those just about/newly turned 5 year olds all along then that's shame on the education department for delivering a service which wasn't matching the advertised target audience. The fact that there is now a trend to send kids later doesn't dissolve the Department from doing what they should have been doing all along - delivering a kindy/prep program that is suitable for the age group they invite to participate in the program (which includes just about/newly turned 5 year olds).
    The curriculum has changed. A lot. The new Australian curriculum is currently being rolled out. I remember having to lie on a mat everyday after lunch in first year of school. In Tasmania, children cannot start school until they are 5.

    Perhaps if parents weren't so worried about NAPLAN results, how "good" a school was according to the myschool website then maybe there wouldn't be that much pressure on children to learn so much straight away.

    And if you think it's too much for small children then do something about it.

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to BigRedV For This Useful Post:

    Chippa  (15-09-2016)

  4. #153
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    my house
    Posts
    17,695
    Thanks
    1,391
    Thanked
    7,284
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    I believe the studies in that they say kids aren't ready for whip-cracking style teaching until they are six (5 hours straight of PowerPoint slides etc). I just don't believe that translates into kids shouldn't start school until they are six. I believe that the kindy/prep program should be a little more relaxed.
    You should volunteer to help out in your child's classroom when they start school. If the teacher is doing everything on PowerPoint, I'd run. That is not teaching. I'm shocked you think that's what happens in schools

    I can't remember ever teaching children with a PowerPoint for 5 hours (or even 5 minutes) but I have taught them how to make a PowerPoint. Gosh, I can't even remember the last time I had to endure a PowerPoint, they're a bit dated

  5. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to BigRedV For This Useful Post:

    cheeeeesecake  (14-09-2016),harvs  (14-09-2016),Rose&Aurelia&Hannah  (15-09-2016)

  6. #154
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    12,706
    Thanks
    9,557
    Thanked
    12,687
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 9/1/15Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 7/11/14Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 3/10/14100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    You should volunteer to help out in your child's classroom when they start school. If the teacher is doing everything on PowerPoint, I'd run. That is not teaching. I'm shocked you think that's what happens in schools

    I can't remember ever teaching children with a PowerPoint for 5 hours (or even 5 minutes) but I have taught them how to make a PowerPoint. Gosh, I can't even remember the last time I had to endure a PowerPoint, they're a bit dated
    I wasn't serious.... I was exaggerating to prove a point

  7. #155
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    26
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked
    23
    Reviews
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    Yes it is different. Big difference when you don't have to pay for 5 hours each day for a big chunk of the year. For starters rebate doesn't run out when you're not using it all day every day. Excursions suck however when kids are young you also have expenses (sport, swimming etc).
    There are additional expenses at all ages.

    I agree school isn't the answer for saving the budget. However I don't think we should be looking at it like that for 4 nearly 5 year olds and brand new 5 year olds. Those age groups have been sent to school since day dot. Sending kids at 6 is a relatively recent trend. Parents sending nearly 5 year olds/new 5 year olds to school aren't doing so to save money they are doing so because that's what's always been done and the guidelines allow it. If the programming is no longer appropriate for that age group that's on the education departments, not the parents.
    Huge difference. Three kids in daycare is over $50000 annually after the rebate. There are months with greater expenses in school but it doesn't get up close to that figure

  8. #156
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    12,706
    Thanks
    9,557
    Thanked
    12,687
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 9/1/15Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 7/11/14Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 3/10/14100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    The curriculum has changed. A lot. The new Australian curriculum is currently being rolled out. I remember having to lie on a mat everyday after lunch in first year of school. In Tasmania, children cannot start school until they are 5.

    Perhaps if parents weren't so worried about NAPLAN results, how "good" a school was according to the myschool website then maybe there wouldn't be that much pressure on children to learn so much straight away.
    .
    I'm a fan of Naplan and the my schools site and I am not ashamed to admit it. It's one of the tools I used to review schools before choosing where my DS went. Of course I know there's more to a school than Naplan so I also looked at size, community, extra curricular activities and most importantly parent reviews. I don't know any parents who have chosen a school on Naplan alone (not saying that doesn't happen). So I have to wonder if it's the teachers who are placing the pressure in themselves? Or the education department totally screwing the messaging up?
    One things for sure though the more teachers protest the Naplan/my schools site the more I wonder why? Why don't they want to give parents access to one of the many tools they need to make the best decision on their child's future? .If it leads to funding being targeted to areas of need, if it leads to underperformaning schools performing better then what's he problem? What do people have to hide? If a small percentage misuse the information so what, I would let that slide for the greater good.

  9. #157
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    12,706
    Thanks
    9,557
    Thanked
    12,687
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 9/1/15Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 7/11/14Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 3/10/14100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    And if you think it's too much for small children then do something about it.
    When the time comes and my DS is in kindy I will do my bit.

    That being said overall it's not my job to ensure the Education Departments curriculum fits their own target audience. That's the job of the Department and it's the role of teachers to feed into that process.

    I have no doubt you are doing a great job as a teacher and don't get me wrong I love teachers. However since you asked the question of me I will ask it of you: what specifically are you doing to ensure the kindy program is appropriate for the target kindy audience? (As per the Education Departments own guidelines)

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to VicPark For This Useful Post:

    babyno1onboard  (14-09-2016)

  11. #158
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    22,839
    Thanks
    6,199
    Thanked
    16,883
    Reviews
    10
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 postsDiamond Star - 20,000 posts
    Awards:
    Bubhub Blogger - Thanks100 Posts in a week
    3 kids in after school care + expenses of school, public or private would come pretty close. Send them to even a semi 'exclusive' school with OOSC and you'd be better off in DC.

  12. #159
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    my house
    Posts
    17,695
    Thanks
    1,391
    Thanked
    7,284
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 posts

    Default Kinder program in childcare if funding isn't approved?

    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    I'm a fan of Naplan and the my schools site and I am not ashamed to admit it. It's one of the tools I used to review schools before choosing where my DS went. Of course I know there's more to a school than Naplan so I also looked at size, community, extra curricular activities and most importantly parent reviews. I don't know any parents who have chosen a school on Naplan alone (not saying that doesn't happen). So I have to wonder if it's the teachers who are placing the pressure in themselves? Or the education department totally screwing the messaging up?
    One things for sure though the more teachers protest the Naplan/my schools site the more I wonder why? Why don't they want to give parents access to one of the many tools they need to make the best decision on their child's future? .If it leads to funding being targeted to areas of need, if it leads to underperformaning schools performing better then what's he problem? What do people have to hide? If a small percentage misuse the information so what, I would let that slide for the greater good.
    Would you like it if the school taught your child how to do the NAPLAN and spent months preparing for *one* test or would you rather your child receive a balanced, broad curriculum that produces a well rounded student?

    I am not against NAPLAN. I am against the publishing of results. Parents shouldn't care about anything but their own child's results which get sent home once NAPLAN has been marked.

    Are you even aware how the myschool website "rates" schools?

    Here is the school my children go to, which would probably make some parents think it's a rubbish school

    ImageUploadedByThe Bub Hub1473848959.238838.jpg

    ImageUploadedByThe Bub Hub1473848995.657971.jpg

  13. #160
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    12,706
    Thanks
    9,557
    Thanked
    12,687
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 9/1/15Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 7/11/14Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 3/10/14100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    Would you like it if the school taught your child how to do the NAPLAN and spent months preparing for *one* test or would you rather your child receive a balanced, broad curriculum that produces a well rounded student?

    I am not against NAPLAN. I am against the publishing of results. Parents shouldn't care about anything but their own child's results which get sent home once NAPLAN has been marked.

    Are you even aware how the myschool website "rates" schools?

    Here is the school my children go to, which would probably make some parents think it's a rubbish school

    Attachment 84327

    Attachment 84328
    There's a failure with the implementation here not a failure with the concept. I don't think schools should be allowed to teach for the Naplan tests. Infact when I am Prime Minister I am going to ban all prep bar a 1 hour familiarization session. Anymore and the offender gets the sack.

    I don't agree that parents should only see their own kids results. Parents have a right to know about the schools strengths and weaknesses so they can figure out what option is best for their child.

    I looked at the results You posted (thanks for sharing). The first thing that struck me was the % of kids from a non English speaking background. This can have positives (exposing your child to different cultures). And it can have negatives (teachers may need to focus more attention on kids who aren't from an English speaking background). The 'low results' were a secondary observation for me. To be honest for my eldest who has issues I am
    Not sure a school where a lot of kids need extra attention would be the best for him. For my second it might be a good option to widen his view of the world. That being said before considering enrolling due to the results I would look at parent reviews and check out the school for myself.


 

Similar Threads

  1. If 2nd year kinder funding is denied...
    By Rebecca79 in forum School aged children
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 29-08-2016, 15:32
  2. Guns and kinder
    By SookiLala in forum General Parenting Tips, Advice & Chat
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 25-07-2016, 07:21
  3. dsq funding
    By kazza87 in forum Parents of Children with Special Needs
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 31-03-2016, 10:09

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Springfree Trampoline
Give the Ultimate Christmas Gift Springfree Trampoline
The World's Safest Trampoline™ is now also the world's first Smart Trampoline™. Sensors on the mat detect your every move and your jumps control fun, educational and active games on tablet. Secure the Ultimate Christmas Gift today!
sales & new stuffsee all
Bub Hub Sales Listing
HAVING A SALE? Let parents know about it with a Bub Hub Sales listing. Listings are featured on our well trafficked Sales Page + selected randomly to appear on EVERY page
featured supporter
Cots on Bubhub
Looking to buy a cot or bassinet? :: Cot safety checklist :: Local or online nursery shops
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!