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  1. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    In this day and age I think it's more than reasonable for schools to be expected to offer more than 9-3 hours (whether it be through before and after school care attached to the school). If an education system is so narrow what it doesn't easily allow both parents to work then it's lost it's relevance in today's society and all the women should just go back to the kitchen.
    The reason it doesn't go longer is several reasons. First, primary kids just don't have the endurance and attention span - after a certain point it's in one ear and out the other, and lots of behavioural issues crop up bc they are exhausted. Also, despite what people think, teachers actually work really long hours. Class itself may finish 3-3.30 but most teachers are at the school preparing lessons, marking etc for 2 hours more and are at school often 1-2 hours before class starts. Adding another 2 hours of class not only means that, it means more programming is needed, more organisation.

    I also don't believe teachers should be babysitters. They are educators. Not offence whatsoever to childcare workers, home baby sitters, their role is important and valuable. But teachers don't spend 4 years at uni to work 12 hour shifts and drag out the school day to babysit so parents can get free child care

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    cheeeeesecake  (13-09-2016),mrsboyts  (15-09-2016)

  3. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by cheeeeesecake View Post
    Yes, let's push 4 year olds into full-time school, to appease the parents who want to use education as a cheap form of child care.
    I think it would be good to acknowledge how expensive childcare is. It's a genuine issue that affects families, sometimes even breaking them. As a full time working parent of 2 kids in daycare, for 1/3 of the year (when the rebate runs out) it costs over $2000 per fortnight out of pocket for childcare. Yes that's right. Not saying it's making your other points any less valid, just that a little more understanding would be great. Parents don't try to disrespect teachers and **** them off. They are just trying to survive.

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  5. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    The reason it doesn't go longer is several reasons. First, primary kids just don't have the endurance and attention span - after a certain point it's in one ear and out the other, and lots of behavioural issues crop up bc they are exhausted. Also, despite what people think, teachers actually work really long hours. Class itself may finish 3-3.30 but most teachers are at the school preparing lessons, marking etc for 2 hours more and are at school often 1-2 hours before class starts. Adding another 2 hours of class not only means that, it means more programming is needed, more organisation.

    I also don't believe teachers should be babysitters. They are educators. Not offence whatsoever to childcare workers, home baby sitters, their role is important and valuable. But teachers don't spend 4 years at uni to work 12 hour shifts and drag out the school day to babysit so parents can get free child care
    I agree structured lessons outside 9-3 is too much. Before and after school care meets the needs IMO.

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  7. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    I think it would be good to acknowledge how expensive childcare is. It's a genuine issue that affects families, sometimes even breaking them. As a full time working parent of 2 kids in daycare, for 1/3 of the year (when the rebate runs out) it costs over $2000 per fortnight out of pocket for childcare. Yes that's right. Not saying it's making your other points any less valid, just that a little more understanding would be great. Parents don't try to disrespect teachers and **** them off. They are just trying to survive.
    Completely agree. The cost of CC is completely ridiculous, and there isn't enough places. Your points are right on. But that's a govt issue. Teachers are there to teach. After school care is there for just that. Personally I believe after school care should be 100% subsidised for *everyone*.

  8. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    Completely agree. The cost of CC is completely ridiculous, and there isn't enough places. Your points are right on. But that's a govt issue. Teachers are there to teach. After school care is there for just that. Personally I believe after school care should be 100% subsidised for *everyone*.
    Everyone? Non working parents and millionaires?

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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    I think it would be good to acknowledge how expensive childcare is. It's a genuine issue that affects families, sometimes even breaking them. As a full time working parent of 2 kids in daycare, for 1/3 of the year (when the rebate runs out) it costs over $2000 per fortnight out of pocket for childcare. Yes that's right. Not saying it's making your other points any less valid, just that a little more understanding would be great. Parents don't try to disrespect teachers and **** them off. They are just trying to survive.

    I agree. Childcare IS ridiculously expensive. I am currently a SAHM (albeit drag my kids around to various volunteer roles in my community), because the cost of child care is too expensive. So we survive on a single income of 60k per year. On a teacher's wage, by the time I paid for my two youngest to attend child care, and my oldest to attend before and after school care, I am paying more in child care than I earn in a week. So I am a SAHM, and my kids have never set foot in a daycare centre, because I can't afford it. I get it. I agree the cost is too expensive, and if the government wants to support mothers in the workforce, they need to make child care MUCH more affordable. And work places much more flexible. But wanting teachers to fill in the gaps is not the answer.

  10. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by cheeeeesecake View Post
    I agree. Childcare IS ridiculously expensive. I am currently a SAHM (albeit drag my kids around to various volunteer roles in my community), because the cost of child care is too expensive. So we survive on a single income of 60k per year. On a teacher's wage, by the time I paid for my two youngest to attend child care, and my oldest to attend before and after school care, I am paying more in child care than I earn in a week. So I am a SAHM, and my kids have never set foot in a daycare centre, because I can't afford it. I get it. I agree the cost is too expensive, and if the government wants to support mothers in the workforce, they need to make child care MUCH more affordable. And work places much more flexible. But wanting teachers to fill in the gaps is not the answer.
    To be honest I have never heard any parent or anyone else suggest teachers should work extra hours to fill the gap

  11. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    Everyone? Non working parents and millionaires?
    When I say everyone, I meant no means testing. I think it should extend to all working parents and those studying FT. For someone like me who has a small child at home at is on leave from uni, there is no reason I should require subsidised after school care. When I go back I'm going to need it as I'll have placement. My DH works FT what do I do with the kids?

  12. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    To be honest I have never heard any parent or anyone else suggest teachers should work extra hours to fill the gap
    **Sorry Vp, I quoted you by accident***

    I'm not contemplating sending my 4yr 11m 14day year old (;-)) to school for teachers to fill the gap, I can afford to have him home and kinder. I'm still unsure what to do...kinder have said he's ready...he's having an assessment in term 4 (the lovely educator knows how anxious I am and is putting in a request and filling out all the paperwork). I'll know by mid-term 4 hopefully what we decide to do.
    Last edited by 2BlueBirds; 13-09-2016 at 22:46.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2BlueBirds View Post
    **Sorry Vp, I quoted you by accident***

    I'm not contemplating sending my 4yr 11m 14day year old (;-)) to school for teachers to fill the gap, I can afford to have him home and kinder. I'm still unsure what to do...kinder have said he's ready...he's having an assessment in term 4 (the lovely educator knows how anxious I am and is putting in a request and filling out all the paperwork). I'll know by mid-term 4 hopefully what we decide to do.
    And in all honestly, if I were in your position I would be tossing up the same decision. I think jan-march is a grey area. I (& I think other teachers) are referring more to kids who dont turn 5 until may, june, july & we are pushed into having. I've taught kids in prep who werent 5 until sept, oct. It's too young. Feb,I say do what feels right for you. Sorry if my comments made you feel bad, I'm not thinking of a february baby when I make them.

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