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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tdez View Post
    Honestly, it's actually not that hard to check the ears under GA as an added thing, a quick look and a swab, the nurse can stain it and have it under the microscope without any hassle. When I was working if we had a pet in for a procedure and the owner wanted us to quickly double check something the only thing that would cost more were any meds needed or tests to be done. I think charging a consult is dumb.
    What about taking a history of the problem? Looking at the slide? Explaining the results and going through how to use the meds? The time all adds up and should be accounted for.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by amyd View Post
    What about taking a history of the problem? Looking at the slide? Explaining the results and going through how to use the meds? The time all adds up and should be accounted for.
    If you have competent nurses you can trust this shouldn't be an issue. I understand some places would need to account for that, but in my example it was based on me the nurse doing most things, eg. I always did the surgical notes the vet would just scan it to make sure nothing was missing, I would do the swab, stain the slide, prepare it under the microscope so all the vet had to do was put their eye on the scope and say 'yes I agree' I would print up the labels and prep the meds, I would go through everything with the owner. The most the vet would do is check the eardrums. So if you have a vet with good, experienced, competent nurses a consult fee would be really unnecessary, and that's where I would want to take my pets.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tdez View Post
    If you have competent nurses you can trust this shouldn't be an issue. I understand some places would need to account for that, but in my example it was based on me the nurse doing most things, eg. I always did the surgical notes the vet would just scan it to make sure nothing was missing, I would do the swab, stain the slide, prepare it under the microscope so all the vet had to do was put their eye on the scope and say 'yes I agree' I would print up the labels and prep the meds, I would go through everything with the owner. The most the vet would do is check the eardrums. So if you have a vet with good, experienced, competent nurses a consult fee would be really unnecessary, and that's where I would want to take my pets.
    But wouldn't they have to pay for the nurses time then? I can't imagine it would be free...

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    bezzy  (27-08-2016)

  5. #14
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    The nurses are being paid for their time there regardless of what they do there, they don't get paid extra for certain things they do, it's hourly and you get paid the same working reception as you would working surgery. So the answer is it doesn't actual cost the vet more to have their nurse do these tasks.

  6. #15
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    The breeder said at the vet she works at it's standard to check an animals ears and clip the nails while they're under. They didn't even clip her nails like I asked.

  7. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tdez View Post
    The nurses are being paid for their time there regardless of what they do there, they don't get paid extra for certain things they do, it's hourly and you get paid the same working reception as you would working surgery. So the answer is it doesn't actual cost the vet more to have their nurse do these tasks.
    I would imagine vets also get paid the same regardless if they are fully booked or or having a slow day? Doesn't mean that clients are not charged for their time and services.

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    amyd  (27-08-2016)

  9. #17
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    Correct, but in the instance that there is a patient in for a procedure that required GA and a request to check something extra that did not require a terrible lot from them there wouldn't really be cause for the extra consult fee, I'm not arguing I'm just pointing out that there are extra things you charge for because they require a great deal of time and effort but some things are not as invasive or difficult that a bit of goodwill for the client is reasonable. Imo checking if the ears have infection and clipping nails come under the latter umbrella.

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    babyno1onboard  (27-08-2016),CanadianKangaroo  (27-08-2016)

  11. #18
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    The nurses are being paid for their time there regardless of what they do there, they don't get paid extra for certain things they do, it's hourly and you get paid the same working reception as you would working surgery. So the answer is it doesn't actual cost the vet more to have their nurse do these tasks.
    Wow, Thanks for devaluing the study, experience and hard work Vet Nurses go through to be recognized. Yes, we're paid an hourly rate but our skills are worth something and that does mean it needs to be on-charged to clients.

    In response to the original query, the dog was scheduled for anaesthetic and xrays and referral for hip scoring. The check over given to that patient, which is part of the anaesthetic charge, is assessing the patient's health in relation to the anaesthetic and how it would be expected of them to metabolise the anaesthetic agents.

    How is the patient's heart? How is the patient's hydration status? How is the patient's capillary refill time, ie peripheral blood flow? Body temperature? Pulse rates and strength & quality of pulse? Patient demeanour? The answers to all of these will determine the vet's choice and quantity of pre-medications and anaesthetic agent choice and protocol. Because it was booked for hip scoring, the pre-checks would have also included a joint soundness check (movement trials, palpation and extension trails).

    The status of a patient's ears would not play a part to the anaesthetic protocol so charging a consultation to evaluate, test and formulate a treatment plan these would be considered normal practice.

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    amyd  (28-08-2016),nh2489  (28-08-2016)

  13. #19
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    I think sadly vet time is grossly undercharged for in many instances and it's one of the things that clients often don't appreciate. It's not just the time involved but also the expertise that is being charged for. It's all well and good saying that the nurse can spend the time doing the procedures but it's up to the vet to use their clinical judgement to decide what treatment to dispense and advice along with it. Dermatology is an area I'm very interested in and 9 times out of 10 an inflammed ear is not just something that needs a few days of drops. It often indicates an underlying allergy and my training and experience would allow me to evaluate if this may be the case (depending on breed, age, type of infection, inflammation etc) and I would then usually spend time printing off information sheets (made by myself) for the owner to discuss these possibilities and further investigation or treatment. All of which would take longer than a standard 15 minute consult so in my opinion charging a consult fee is well justified.

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    amyd  (28-08-2016)

  15. #20
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    Default Vets or vet techs...question regarding fees.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tropical Bub View Post
    Wow, Thanks for devaluing the study, experience and hard work Vet Nurses go through to be recognized. Yes, we're paid an hourly rate but our skills are worth something and that does mean it needs to be on-charged to clients.
    Sorry I made it sound like that, I wasn't meaning it to come out like that at all, I was simply saying that us nurses don't actually get paid extra to go above and beyond we just do it because it's what we do. I absolutely appreciate where your coming from and I apologise if you felt I was devaluating out profession, because I know how hard we work and for a very small wage.

    I do however stand by that checking ears can be done without a massive extra fee incurred, if you look at them and see there is way more than meets the eye it's not hard to pick up the phone and let the client know that it's a bigger job and will be more expensive or even on admission you should be able to see that the ears are in a bad way to warrant that kind of intervention.
    Last edited by Tdez; 28-08-2016 at 07:33.


 

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