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  1. #61
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    I haven't read many responses, but my two cents is - yes, it's important if you know that the career you are aiming for requires a university degree.

    I do not think university is important for those who have no solid plan on what career they are aiming for (for example, the many young folk who leave high school and go straight to uni to to an arts degree). If you are not driven to achieve a certain job, then I think the chances of dropping out mid-way through the degree, or simply not putting your achievements into practical terms, are high.

    I must say I'm quite partial to a trade, and would recommend this to a lot of young people who feel that uni isn't for them.

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by babyno1onboard View Post
    I'm very off topic here but I saw some doctor jobs advertised recently I was shocked at how little they were offering in terms of pay. After studying for so many years and having a job with such high levels of responsibility I wish our doctors were paid more.
    This surprises me because I know the starting salary for our doctors is $250,000 plus other perks and overtime.

  3. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by JR03 View Post
    Happiness is important but I also don't want my children living week to week, wondering what they'll eat for dinner. Sometimes you need to do a job you don't like for a while just because it's what pays the bills.

    As with PPs, I won't encourage my kids to do an arts degree for the sake of the degree (but I would support doing arts with a teaching masters to follow) or to be a career musician or actor, there are just no job prospects for them. I did a business degree where our major choices were things like accounting, HR, marketing, etc. the number of marketing students was huge and of course there aren't many graduate jobs in marketing (true marketing, not telesales) so many were unemployed / underemployed for 12-24 months after we finished and some continued on to do honours or masters to specialize in a different area where they could find work. So I think a lot of thought needs to be put into job prospects before choosing a degree as its a huge time and money commitment if you can't get a job at the end of it.
    I hope my kids are happy working in a job that provides them with financial security, but ultimately I want them to be happy. My DH has been told continouosly over his career life by family that he needs to just get a real job and to give up on his (perceived) unachieveable dream...but he ignored everyone and he's made his dream come true. It's taken so much commitment on his part, and support on my part (like when we were struggling to pay bills), but he made it. I would struggle to tell my kids to give up on their dream job (no matter how unachieveable it seems), if they remain committed to the cause after the path I went down with DH.I guess my view is influenced by the journey I've been on with DH. We absolutely lived week by week for months at a time, and it would have been easier to give up and for DH to find a job that paid the bills, even though he would have been unhappy. But, he would have been miserable. For DH, reaching his career goals is a significant part of who he is. To ask him to abandon that would be like asking someone to cut off their right arm. I can already see this drive and determination in some of our children.
    My grandad worked in a very low income job that he loved...my grandparents lived week for week because of that. He retired, and missed his job so much he went back to it after three months and continued to work for another 15 years post retirement 😂 I hope my kids enjoy their work that much.

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  5. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by JR03 View Post
    Happiness is important but I also don't want my children living week to week, wondering what they'll eat for dinner. Sometimes you need to do a job you don't like for a while just because it's what pays the bills.

    .
    I agree. I hope our boys will be in a job where they are happy but earn a descent wage to not struggle financially too much and have something to show for themselves. Confident one or all 3 will follow in their fathers and grandfathers footsteps and go into the navy or get a trade.
    Dh has been a high income earner and a mid income earner and low income earner over the years and happiness has come from less financial struggle that's for sure. We've been alot happier being in the middle to high financial bracket.
    It is important to be happy in your work though, I couldn't do a job I didn't like nor could dh.

  6. #65
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    I have 2 cousins in the arts, 1 successful artist, 1 very successful in performing arts. Both have degrees and needed to use them to earn a living before they became successful enough in their art (in their 40's) to earn a living.
    If one of my children wanted to be an artist or performer I would encourage some sort of qualification first so they don't have to struggle their whole lives.

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  8. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mod-Degrassi View Post
    I haven't read many responses, but my two cents is - yes, it's important if you know that the career you are aiming for requires a university degree.

    I do not think university is important for those who have no solid plan on what career they are aiming for (for example, the many young folk who leave high school and go straight to uni to to an arts degree). If you are not driven to achieve a certain job, then I think the chances of dropping out mid-way through the degree, or simply not putting your achievements into practical terms, are high.

    .
    And this is what happened to me. I finished year 12 at 17 (hence why I will always push for the minimum starting school age to be raised) and had no clue what to do.

    I struggled with maturity, couldn't grasp not calling lecturers and tutors 'sir' or 'miss'. I knew I loved what I wanted to study - but never really thought about the careers that I could get with that degree.

    A gap year or starting kindy when I was 5.5, finishing school at 18.5, would have made the world of difference and I would have thought more carefully about what I wanted to do with my life.

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  10. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by misho View Post
    A gap year or starting kindy when I was 5.5, finishing school at 18.5, would have made the world of difference and I would have thought more carefully about what I wanted to do with my life.
    It's amazing what a year means to maturity at this age

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    binnielici  (23-08-2016)

  12. #68
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    My kids are in Kindy and year 1, so these decisions seem a lifetime away, but no, I don't think Uni is essential to having a good career. I left school in year 10 and did a diploma in admin. I was earning more than my husband who has a degree when we met LOL.

    I think having some qualification is important, but whether that is a Uni degree, apprenticeship or diploma will depend on what the kids have in mind for their careers. I certainly want more for them than working at the local Coles or fast food joint, but won't be pushing for them to do Uni over a trade if they want to go that way.

    Things may change in the next 10 years to alter that view, but right now, often tradies are making more $$ than people with degree based jobs without all the HECS debt.

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  14. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blessedwith3boys View Post
    This surprises me because I know the starting salary for our doctors is $250,000 plus other perks and overtime.
    The ad I saw was $130k.

  15. #70
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    It really depends on what career you want. It's non negotiable for a variety of professions. Even though, for many, it's just a piece of paper and the 'real' learning starts on the job.

    I think there was far too much emphasis on going to uni when I was at school. Like if you didn't go to uni at 17 (when we finished high school) you would miss out forever. Which is not the case, I think alternate pathways to uni (ie work first in the industry, see if you like it before committing to a 4 year degree etc) should be emphasised more to school leavers.

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