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  1. #51
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    Ive not read any responses, but no a university career is not the be all and end all.

    I will encourage my kids to do what ever they are passionate about, whether that be a trade, a doctor, a lawyer, a plumber, a retail assistant / managemer, musician what ever.

    As long as they do everything they can to earn money and look after themselves, I don't care what they do. I've learnt recently that it's the stupidest idea in the world to pick a career based on what you earn, there is so much more to life than earning good money, why earn lots of money if you have to work too long and stress about work while you're not at work and that's what's important - doing something you like and that gives you the best work/life balance

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  3. #52
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    Both dh and I are reasonably academic and I work in the field so ds is likely to gravitate that way without our encouragement. I just hope he is happy/finds something he enjoys that will support him.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    Class sizes are bigger, fewer teachers, courses are way more expensive (I'm talking a 500% increase) the government has closed down campuses or sold them off and many campuses are like ghost towns, tafe has to now compete with the private sector whose primary aim is profit.
    Shame. In SA the government is heavily subsidising TAFE qualifications. I'm currently doing a Cert IV in interior decoration and it's VERY affordable. I was eligible for the subsidy even though I already have a Bachelors Degree.

    I work in Tertiary recruitment (marketing) and I don't truly believe in the product. I speak to so many kids and parents about their options and there is still a lot of pressure from parents on kids to go to uni, I prefer to talk to students on their own and tell them to pick a degree (or other pathway) based on their passion - most think they should study the degree with the highest ATAR they qualify for.

    I also then tell them to always look for opportunities for work experience, internships and other training in achieving a successful careers (talking with career counsellors etc, learn all about personal branding etc), those things are also very important, a Uni degree or any qualification is useless unless you do your best and try and set yourself apart from the crowd of other graduates.

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    No it's not, there are plenty of jobs and careers that don't require uni.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Homeschooling4 View Post
    No it's not, there are plenty of jobs and careers that don't require uni.
    You've got to be careful though. Only a small/medium? percentage of those offer a decent income and lifestyle.

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    I always chuckle when people talk sbout uni students living a life of luxury. I only had 20 contact hours (pracs excepted) so would cram it into 2 10 hour days. Then I worked another 25 hours a week to, you know, pay my rent. Then I was expected to do around 20 hours of study a week (lower contact hours but more homework/study). So a good 65 hours a week normally, with pracs on top. It was hard work!

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    I think going to university is more important now then ever, apart from doing a trade (where you can sometimes earn more money then doctors)
    The problem is that we have a big youth unemployment issue and everyone has a degree. So naturally employers will pick the most qualified people. I have seen degrees requested for admin jobs, low paying ones as well.
    I want my kids to be happy but I also want them to make a wise decision about their earning potential and the lifestyle they want. I don't want them doing an arts degree because it's their passion when they will end up working in Coles because there is no work. Hopefully they can find a happy medium.
    Universities have a lot to answer for selling useless degrees or lying to students about their job prospects.

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    Quote Originally Posted by VicPark View Post
    You've got to be careful though. Only a small/medium? percentage of those offer a decent income and lifestyle.
    Does income matter if you're happy doing what you love? I didn't do my degree for the money I'd get at the end of it. I did it because I'm passionate about my job, and enjoy going to work every day.
    I have a friend who works at Coles, her husband is a tow truck driver. Low income earners...my friend has worked her way up the ranks at Coles, and her husband wanted to be a tow truck driver from when he was a little boy. It is his dream job, and he works hard, but he loves what he does.
    I have another friend who is an engineer...high pay, extremely intelligent man. He had a nervous breakdown a few years ago. He wanted to be a carpenter, but because he is so smart he was constantly told he could be so much more. He wouldn't have earnt the same amount being a carpenter, no...but he's not enjoying his money loaded life either. I'd rather be poor but happy, personally.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Full House View Post
    Does income matter if you're happy doing what you love? I didn't do my degree for the money I'd get at the end of it. I did it because I'm passionate about my job, and enjoy going to work every day.
    I have a friend who works at Coles, her husband is a tow truck driver. Low income earners...my friend has worked her way up the ranks at Coles, and her husband wanted to be a tow truck driver from when he was a little boy. It is his dream job, and he works hard, but he loves what he does.
    I have another friend who is an engineer...high pay, extremely intelligent man. He had a nervous breakdown a few years ago. He wanted to be a carpenter, but because he is so smart he was constantly told he could be so much more. He wouldn't have earnt the same amount being a carpenter, no...but he's not enjoying his money loaded life either. I'd rather be poor but happy, personally.
    Happiness is important but I also don't want my children living week to week, wondering what they'll eat for dinner. Sometimes you need to do a job you don't like for a while just because it's what pays the bills.

    As with PPs, I won't encourage my kids to do an arts degree for the sake of the degree (but I would support doing arts with a teaching masters to follow) or to be a career musician or actor, there are just no job prospects for them. I did a business degree where our major choices were things like accounting, HR, marketing, etc. the number of marketing students was huge and of course there aren't many graduate jobs in marketing (true marketing, not telesales) so many were unemployed / underemployed for 12-24 months after we finished and some continued on to do honours or masters to specialize in a different area where they could find work. So I think a lot of thought needs to be put into job prospects before choosing a degree as its a huge time and money commitment if you can't get a job at the end of it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Janesmum123 View Post
    I think going to university is more important now then ever, apart from doing a trade (where you can sometimes earn more money then doctors)
    The problem is that we have a big youth unemployment issue and everyone has a degree. So naturally employers will pick the most qualified people. I have seen degrees requested for admin jobs, low paying ones as well.
    I want my kids to be happy but I also want them to make a wise decision about their earning potential and the lifestyle they want. I don't want them doing an arts degree because it's their passion when they will end up working in Coles because there is no work. Hopefully they can find a happy medium.
    Universities have a lot to answer for selling useless degrees or lying to students about their job prospects.
    I'm very off topic here but I saw some doctor jobs advertised recently I was shocked at how little they were offering in terms of pay. After studying for so many years and having a job with such high levels of responsibility I wish our doctors were paid more.


 

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