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  1. #31
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    Default "Sort of spin off " is going university important?

    As a woman who didn't bother to finish her degree and now am a mum, yep, Uni is more important than I gave it credit for. Having come back from 6 years of babies/ mat leave time, it would be so much easier if I had a degree now. Everyone just sees me as a mum and with no degree behind me in my field. If I quit my job, I'll have difficulty finding something else-especially part time that pays decent and is interesting work.

    So yes, I wish I had finished 15 years ago.

    Having said that, if my boys want to be a mechanic or some sort of a tradie, I'd be ok with it, boys seem to do better with that stuff (and I know that's stereotyping and not PC to say). As long as they have qualifications and have some sort of ambition - maybe to start their own business or something.

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  3. #32
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    Default "Sort of spin off " is going university important?

    I'm with those who have said uni isn't necessarily important (depending on desired career path) but having something (trade / tafe quals / degree) is preferable. If DD isn't sure what she wants to do when she finishes school I will encourage her to take a year off and if she still isn't sure then pursue a general degree that can be used as a pathway for many different careers (eg science or engineering degree).

    I have a science degree and work as a scientist but in a different field of science to what I studied. My careers had taken all sorts of turn along the way and most of what I have done for work I did not learn at uni however I would never have gotten an entry level job (10 years ago) without a degree.

    I think so many people have degrees now that it's hard to get an entry level job that previously did not require a degree without one because employers can easily find candidates with degrees and they are seen as a better choice.

    I do work with one or two people who got to their position without a degree but they have 30+ years experience and would have started out in an era where degrees weren't necessary

    So after writing all that I've convinced myself that degrees are quite important in my generation and will likely be even more important in the next generation. (With exceptions for some careers of course).
    Last edited by babyno1onboard; 22-08-2016 at 18:03.

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  5. #33
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    I think having a qualification is important - most jobs these days seem to want some kind of formal qualification (even if it's not really essential to the role) but I don't think a Uni degree is necessarily better than a tafe certificate. It really comes down to what you want to do - there's no point getting an accounting degree if you really want to be a diesel mechanic. Plenty of people in trades earn as good or better money than people with corporate jobs.

    I think it's also important to acknowledge that Uni is not for everyone either. I went to uni and left after five years with two bachelor degrees and a grad dip. I enjoyed my time studying, worked hard and I still work in the field I studied. My DH is probably the smartest person I know, but he just sucks at applying himself to study. He skated through year 12 and got great marks in his exams without really studying. Then he started an engineering degree but never finished it, started a computer science degree but dropped out of that too - both times it was because he hates to study, if he can't just get his hands dirty and do it he's not interested (and probably that he spent too much time at the uni tavern too). I still maintain he'd be an excellent engineer, if only he could have stayed interested in the course! But he's a mechanic now, he loved doing his apprenticeship because it was practical and he was learning by doing which just suits his style of learning much better. It's a shame really because in my experience even with a degree you learn most of what you need on the job anyway, so it would be nice if unis could cater for different learning styles better.

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  7. #34
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    Uni is important if the job/career you want requires a degree.
    As the world changes and demand for certain jobs changes, so too do the training/education needs.
    E.g. The service industry is growing. A lot of service industry jobs don't need a degree. The tech industry is also becoming increasingly important and there's probably stacks of jobs that require a degree in that industry.
    I think it's a big fat "it depends".
    My DH is a farmer but did a trade before going back to the family farm. This saves them thousands in machinery maintenance a year because it's a relevant trade.
    I'd love any child of mine to find something to do in life that they love, that they can make a living out of, and that can help them participate productively in society.
    If that means going to uni, then great and I'll support them however I can.

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  9. #35
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    Default "Sort of spin off " is going university important?

    I went and i wouldn't be disappointed if my children didn't go as long as they earn a decent wage and still have a good work life balance.

    If talking purely financial reasons a "better job" doesn't necessarily mean you need to go to uni. Last financial year, my husband earned almost 4 times the amount I earned and he has no formal qualifications or degree in his current line of work. He did a trade in his home country but hasn't worked in that field since emigrating to Australia.

    As an aside... The way tafe has been decimated by this state government has led to its demise. I would be very surprised if Tafe still exists in 10 years time.

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    And even to be a police officer in NSW you are required to do a Uni degree now. And that doesn't even guarantee you'll get in.

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  13. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post

    As an aside... The way tafe has been decimated by this state government has led to its demise. I would be very surprised if Tafe still exists in 10 years time.
    Can u explain?

    Genuine question, I have no idea what's happened to TAFE.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elijahs Mum View Post


    The threads about school and homework got me thinking about what we were chatting about at lunch yesterday with friends that going to uni is more of a must these days to get a better job/career ?
    DH and I never went and one of the reasons we chose DS school is that it has a registered TAFE section so the boys who wanted to do a trade and not go to uni could finish school and go straight into an apprenticeship as I didn't think I cared what DS wanted to do when he left school but now with house prices and the cost of living rising and apparently now more and more jobs require a degree - should we be encouraging our kids to want to go to uni ? I'm all for letting kids do what they love but I never want DS to struggle financially?

    Will you encourage your kids go go to uni? Is it important to you? Do you regret going/not going?
    Dh did an apprenticeship and ran his dads business in that trade, then into the mining industry, he then went into the navy then the police service and back to mining and now health. Over the years he has done alot of study in law while he was in the police, ohs, training and assessment cert 4 amongst others. He still dabbles in his trade too.
    I left school at 15 not having a clue what I wanted to do, I just wanted to leave school and earn my own money. My first job was in a coffee shop fulltime for 3 years, I went on to work in bars and a restaurant. It wasn't until I was 20 that I decided I wanted to study pharmacy. I did my diploma and stayed in pharmacy both retail and hospital for over 15yrs before doing clerical roles. I still work in pharmacy 1 day a week and have nearly finished another medical diploma.
    Dh and I will encourage the boys to do an apprenticeship should they not wish to go to uni. As long as they are working is all that really matters.
    I think it often makes a difference how much knowledge/experience you have as to what you are paid.
    If dh hadn't had the knowledge he has due to the study he has done he wouldn't have had his high paid role in the mines and my position is specialised with not many even knowing what it's about, there are very few levels equivalent so not easy to get into.

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    Default "Sort of spin off " is going university important?

    Quote Originally Posted by monnie24 View Post
    Of course some do work hard- but a majority sit around not really doing anything. It's a huge adjustment from high school as tafe and Uni are very different and so is high school.
    I see where you're coming from Monnie. Although there was a lot of work involved when I went to uni a chunk of it was also about coffee. And getting on the grog Thursday night at the local club ("Uni night"). And getting on the grog, Friday, Saturday, sleeping in Sunday. And toga parties.

    And most people didn't even end up working in the field they trained in.

    I still think Uni is valuable though (I know! Doesn't make sense!)
    Last edited by VicPark; 22-08-2016 at 20:29.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hollywood View Post
    University is only important if what you want to do requires a degree! My DP hasn't got formal qualifications, he only did part of the building apprenticeship, then went into plastering, largely self taught (or on the job training). He's now been a plasterer for 20 years and earns $45/hour if he charges hourly rates. He's very good at what he does and has never been out of work despite never advertising. I'm sure there's jobs out there that require a degree that don't earn that hourly rate (and of course plenty that do earn more). Really depends what you want to do.
    I graduated from a 5 year double degree 10 years ago and earn marginally more than you hubby. The kicker is that in my field I'm actually regarded as well paid. For those wondering - vets aren't in it for the money.

    I don't think Uni is essential but do believe some form of tertiary education is. We have 3 boys and a farm and even if the boys want to work the farm they will have to go to tafe and see a bit of the outside world before hiding on our farm forever.

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