+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 11 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 110
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    10,291
    Thanks
    3,115
    Thanked
    6,303
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts

    Default "Sort of spin off " is going university important?



    The threads about school and homework got me thinking about what we were chatting about at lunch yesterday with friends that going to uni is more of a must these days to get a better job/career ?
    DH and I never went and one of the reasons we chose DS school is that it has a registered TAFE section so the boys who wanted to do a trade and not go to uni could finish school and go straight into an apprenticeship as I didn't think I cared what DS wanted to do when he left school but now with house prices and the cost of living rising and apparently now more and more jobs require a degree - should we be encouraging our kids to want to go to uni ? I'm all for letting kids do what they love but I never want DS to struggle financially?

    Will you encourage your kids go go to uni? Is it important to you? Do you regret going/not going?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    1,168
    Thanks
    520
    Thanked
    713
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    I think I will be encouraging my children to get some sort of qualification, either trade or Uni, I don't care. As long as they have some skills that will give them a good base to start their adult lives.

    I went to uni... Personally I don't think it's essential but it does open doors.

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to Olive Oil For This Useful Post:

    Elijahs Mum  (22-08-2016)

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Roleystone
    Posts
    1,707
    Thanks
    2,383
    Thanked
    1,875
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    I don't think going to uni is necessary to get a 'good' job. I work in the legal field and see so many people either 1) finish their law degree and realise it's not what they want to do, then either have to get a job doing it anyway because they've put in all the time and effort, or start from scratch all over again. 2) Start working much later in life with a big HECS debt 3) are unable to get a job in their chosen field because there are more people with a degree finishing uni than jobs available in that field.

    I think if the job you want requires a degree, then sure, go for it. If it requires a trade, go for that too. But getting a uni degree for the sake of getting a degree isn't necessarily the way to go.

    I didn't go to uni because it didn't interest me. I started working at 16 instead and worked my way up the corporate ladder with experience. By the time I was 20 I was earning very good money and had no HECS debt. My friends that went to uni were only just starting out at that stage. They don't necessarily earn more than I do now.

    Something I've noticed (and recruiting is part of my job), unless it's a specific job that requires a degree you're going for (i.e. Lawyer, Doctor etc) work experience seems to mean more to an employer than a degree.

    Trades can get you there too, without the big debt. My DH earns much more as an auto electrician at the moment than any of the lawyers at my office.

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to HillDweller For This Useful Post:

    Elijahs Mum  (22-08-2016)

  6. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    2,019
    Thanks
    2,767
    Thanked
    1,012
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    I went to Uni (double degree plus postgraduate study) whereas my sister did not. We have gone down very different paths in terms of employment and I have to say she is a LOT happier and fulfilled in this respect than I am. That said she has never earned the income I have - but honestly money is not everything.

    I initially wanted DS1 to go to Uni however it was not what he wanted and he started a school based apprenticeship, then went full time and did not complete year 12. He was a qualified tradesman at 20 and is working full time in his trade now. He is earning good money for such a young man (21.5) and very happy with what he does.

    I think it is important to obtain a qualification of some sort. I think it is important to build skills as well. However I don't think Uni is the be all and end all predictor of earning a good income.

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to binnielici For This Useful Post:

    Elijahs Mum  (22-08-2016)

  8. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    1,039
    Thanks
    114
    Thanked
    1,352
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts

    Default "Sort of spin off " is going university important?

    I did 9 years at uni! Eek. I'm just finishing now and have a job lined up for after bubs is born.

    My husband didn't go to uni but did a trade. Up until now he's earns more than me (obviously as I only have a scholarship), but he will only earn 10k less than me once I return to work.

    Sometimes I wonder was that 10k really worth 9 years at uni??
    Last edited by Thescientist; 22-08-2016 at 18:33.

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to Thescientist For This Useful Post:

    Elijahs Mum  (22-08-2016)

  10. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    857
    Thanks
    949
    Thanked
    604
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    There is certainly a general correlation between a uni education and higher lifetime earnings, but it is just that - general. There are plenty of uni degrees and uni graduates who don't have a high earning capacity; likewise, there are some trades that have a high earning potential. And it's complicated by the fact that the jobs of today may not be the jobs of tomorrow.

    While I'd love for DS1 and DS2 to attend uni (because it is a great experience and teaches you how to learn), my focus will be on ensuring that they continue on with some sort of education and obtain some quals, be it a uni degree or a trade. I don't see any point in pushing kids towards uni if they're uninterested or not academically inclined or want to pursue a trade instead. But there is definitely a need for kids to do something beyond Year 12.

  11. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Gentoo For This Useful Post:

    babyno1onboard  (22-08-2016),Elijahs Mum  (22-08-2016)

  12. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    2,612
    Thanks
    2,724
    Thanked
    864
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    I think it depends what the child wants to do. I would never push my child into uni if that is not what they wanted to do.

    DD1 wants to be a vet, so when picking high school for her we are going with the one that has a more university campus feel e.g encourages questioning of teachers, assessments set out for the entire semester (with due dates given), no uniform. This is a public school, but treats the children from year 7 as young adults, with the added responsibility.

    DD2 at this stage wants to be a hairdresser, so completely different.

    So it depends on the child and what their goals are. I do want both my girls to know that they can do university if they want, but there are plenty of other pathways to get there than a year 12 result.

  13. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to PomPoms For This Useful Post:

    Elijahs Mum  (22-08-2016),HillDweller  (22-08-2016)

  14. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Gold Coast, QLD
    Posts
    3,594
    Thanks
    1,292
    Thanked
    1,105
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    I don't think university is a must or a qualification for that matter. DH and I came from very different backgrounds, his family thought a job was a job so he was happy in his $30k job whereas I went straight from school into the gov sector and worked my way up the ladder. Yes, I have qualifications now but I never needed them. DH is now in the defence force earning a 6 figure income with great housing and health entitlements. Still, he has no qualifications yet earns more than most of our friends who have been to university.
    If our daughters want to go to uni, we will support that. If they want to work in a fast food restaurant, I will support that too as long as they are happy.

  15. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to BabyG4 For This Useful Post:

    Elijahs Mum  (22-08-2016),HillDweller  (22-08-2016),Little Miss Sunshine  (22-08-2016)

  16. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    806
    Thanks
    271
    Thanked
    374
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Both DH & I went to uni and have reasonably well paid careers. I will be encouraging my children to get some sort of qualification whether it be a degree, apprenticeship or traineeship with a specific job in mind.
    The one thing I want them to avoid is getting a degree that doesn't set them on the path to a career. I have friends who did arts degrees and it took them a long time working in minimum wage jobs to find their "niche" mainly through more training.
    I guess what I'm saying is have a goal and work towards it rather than just get a degree for the sake of it. If they really hate the career they have qualified for they can at least earn a living while re-training for something else!

  17. The Following User Says Thank You to rosey82 For This Useful Post:

    Elijahs Mum  (22-08-2016)

  18. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    4,270
    Thanks
    8,177
    Thanked
    3,913
    Reviews
    1
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts

    Default "Sort of spin off " is going university important?

    Uni isn't suited for everyone.
    Last edited by Little Miss Sunshine; 22-08-2016 at 18:40.

  19. The Following User Says Thank You to Little Miss Sunshine For This Useful Post:

    Elijahs Mum  (22-08-2016)


 

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 23-01-2016, 01:30
  2. "Skin colour" pencils/crayons & teaching diversity
    By Lilahh in forum General Chat
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 28-08-2015, 08:39

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Fridge-To-Go Australasia
Xmas with a NEW Fridge-to-go Lunch Bag! Fridge-To-Go Australasia
Fridge-to-go 8 hour cooler bags are ideal under the Christmas tree! Now in modern lunch bag designs - fill them with toys and chocolate to make parents and kids happy! Stay super cool and eat healthy and fresh food all summer long!
sales & new stuffsee all
Bub Hub Sales Listing
HAVING A SALE? Let parents know about it with a Bub Hub Sales listing. Listings are featured on our well trafficked Sales Page + selected randomly to appear on EVERY page
featured supporter
Swim Australia
Swim Australia are the leading learn-to-swim experts, and national swim school authority. With over 600 Registered Swim Schools located across the country, through our aquatic education, we aim to build a Safer, Smarter, Stronger nation of swimmers.
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!