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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    Just looking at the English curriculum/outcomes for preprimary in WA and it is comparable with other states. I think it is a lot for a child who is only 4.5 at the beginning of the year with no flexibility to let them stay home another year. I know my daughter (end of May birthday) would not have coped with all of that and more plus socially as well in first year of school but she would've had to endure it if we lived in WA.

    Here are some outcomes from the WA pre-primary syllabus:

    Use comprehension strategies to understand and discuss texts listened to, viewed or read independently

    Read decodable and predictable texts, practising phrasing and fluency, and monitor meaning using concepts about print and emerging contextual, semantic, grammatical and phonic knowledge

    Construct texts using software including word processing programs

    Recognise and generate rhyming words, alliteration patterns, syllables and sounds (phonemes) in spoken words

    Understand how to use knowledge of letters and sounds including onset and rime to spell words

    Segment sentences into individual words and orally blend and segment onset and rime in single syllable spoken words, and isolate, blend and manipulate phonemes in single syllable words

    Know how to read and write some high-frequency words and other familiar words

    Understand that words are units of meaning and can be made of more than one meaningful part

    Participate in shared editing of students' own texts for meaning, spelling, capital letters and full stops

    Understand that punctuation is a feature of written text different from letters; recognise how capital letters are used for names, and that capital letters and full stops signal the beginning and end of sentences
    I'll just preface that I left WA almost 3 years ago but at that stage the Australian National Curriculum was being rolled out there, so I'm not sure if they have reverted back to the Outcomes based Curriculum Framework, if the things you listed are from AC Foundation or from the obsolete WACF. I'm too busy switching from AC to the 'new' vic curriculum to look it all up, lol!

    Bringing in the AC did mean they needed to push a bit more into the curriculum at Pre-P level and push along all other levels. That was not easy on anyone, regardless of when their birthday was!

    I'm assuming the list you provided are end of year outcomes expectations. They all look pretty reasonable for a child 5y 4m old - however I know when dealing with curriculum documents there can be some interpretation of what "achievement" actually looks like. Then there is the distinction between curriculum you need to cover and what you expect a child to know and do.

    "Use comprehension strategies to understand and discuss texts listened to, viewed or read independently"

    Looking at this example, what this means is that after you have read a book to a child they can tell you one or 2 details/main ideas and/or answer some questions about it (eg. Who was the story about?)

    They're all in "curriculum-speak" making them sound more complex than what they are.

  2. #22
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    Curiosity got to me, OK it looks like WA are doing the same as Vic and ditching the AC, so those are scope and sequence descriptions. I couldn't find the achievement standards descriptions easily though.

    There are definitely kids identified as "not ready" to start Pre-P though, since the school already has them in Kindy it's pretty easy to work out readiness. The difference from WA to Vic that I see though is that maybe 1 in 100 "younger" children get flagged and possibly repeat Kindy or get referred to a language support class, whereas the suburb I teach in vic has 70-80% of Jan-April birthdays delay regardless.

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    I just googled Sophia mundi school (a Steiner school located in central Melbourne). fees for prep are $12k per year. my eyes are watering!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by turquoisecoast View Post
    I just googled Sophia mundi school (a Steiner school located in central Melbourne). fees for prep are $12k per year. my eyes are watering!!
    Steiner is expensive no doubt about it. In part it is because if the materials used in the rooms. There's no plastic everything, chairs and tables, all toys and equipment are natural materials. So timber, ceramics, copper pots and kettles for the home corner. Any fabrics are made of organic cottons and wool, the dolls are felted wool and all hand made. The crayons they use to draw are organic bees wax with natural dyes 😊 Even the flooring and fixtures are natural materials - it doesn't come cheap. This goes right through the school. Often the buildings and chairs/tables are made (by hand) out of any trees that need to be cleared to build the school. Anyway there are a host of other reasons for the cost (specialist accreditation for the teachers in Steiner) but definitely the environment of the school is costly in itself.

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    Quote Originally Posted by turquoisecoast View Post
    I just googled Sophia mundi school (a Steiner school located in central Melbourne). fees for prep are $12k per year. my eyes are watering!!
    Agh. Prep was $9K at the school my DSSs go to and DF wants to send DD. The only thing we ever argue about is friggin schools fees!! Agh!! It will be about $35k per year when they are all at school 😡

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    Quote Originally Posted by babyno1onboard View Post
    Agh. Prep was $9K at the school my DSSs go to and DF wants to send DD. The only thing we ever argue about is friggin schools fees!! Agh!! It will be about $35k per year when they are all at school
    How on earth can anyone afford that??

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wise Enough View Post
    How on earth can anyone afford that??
    That's my point!!! Please help me talk sense into DF!!! That doesn't include uniforms, etc either. Sigh.

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    I would be googling every article about private school kids who went wrong and sending it to him .

    I looked at a cheaper private one. Prep starts about $5k and up to $12k in final years. I realised with two girls close in age I would be paying $24k a year in those last years. I earn ok money but I can't afford that. So I've put their names down for high school there and will see where I am financially in 6 years time. Lots of great primary schools in my area but high schools aren't grear

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    Quote Originally Posted by babyno1onboard View Post
    Agh. Prep was $9K at the school my DSSs go to and DF wants to send DD. The only thing we ever argue about is friggin schools fees!! Agh!! It will be about $35k per year when they are all at school
    To be fair though, it's probably more to do with wanting his kids at the same school, no? I wouldn't send one of my kids to an elite school and the other to a public school for example..

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    Quote Originally Posted by lulupetal View Post
    To be fair though, it's probably more to do with wanting his kids at the same school, no? I wouldn't send one of my kids to an elite school and the other to a public school for example..
    Haha yes I get that but if I had my way none of them would go there.


 

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