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  1. #31
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    Default What are your thoughts about homework?

    Quote Originally Posted by harvs View Post
    I am philosophically opposed to homework but at our school there is an expectation from our parents that we set it. So I set reading and then minimal other stuff. If children don't complete class work through behaviour reasons such as talking, work avoidance etc then I will send the unfinished work home to be completed.

    I talk about homework being a commitment that students make to their learning and it's important to honour that commitment.

    Because I don't set very much (like ten minutes worth) I expect that it's completed, or that there is a note from home. I never challenge parent notes, but I do think it's an important aspect of learning responsibility, time management and organisation to either complete homework or acknowledge that it isn't completed.

    I give out dojo (reward) points for completed homework so generally it gets done :-)
    This sounds very reasonable to me. I do take on board the points made by others about kids being kids, but I also think if they do homework (even if it's just readers in the first year or so) right from the beginning it will be their norm and has all the other benefits you mention @harvs.

    The whole no homework at all stance seems a bit too free range parenting for me, but I think 10-15 minutes a night seems fair, it seems to still have its benefits but kids aren't sitting for too long on it.

    Can any of the teachers in here tell me the reason why homework is set in the first place if so many teachers and principals seem against it? Surely it can't just be because some parents demand it? And if so why do you believe they demand it?
    Last edited by A-Squared; 22-08-2016 at 15:24.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by A-Squared View Post
    This sounds very reasonable to me. I do take on board the points made by others about kids being kids, but I also think if they do homework (even if it's just readers in the first year or so) right from the beginning it will be their norm and has all the other benefits you mention @harvs.

    The whole no homework at all stance seems a bit too free range parenting for me, but I think 10-15 minutes a night seems fair, it seems to still have its benefits but kids aren't sitting for too long on it.

    Can any of the teachers in here tell me the reason why homework is set in the first place if so many teachers and principals seem against it? Surely it can't just be because some parents demand it? And if so why do you believe they demand it?
    I'm not a teacher, but on your first point (and purely anecdotal evidence), my kids didn't have homework as the norm until year 5. So far, my kids have adjusted to this really well. We do projects in the early years, but not sheets of homework. I've listened to my friends complain that that ten minutes of homework drags out to half an hour or more when their child doesn't want to do it.
    There's research to support that there are no benefits to homework before year 5. We're not free range when it comes to our kids education at all, but in those early years it's so easy to incorporate learning in to play. The kids love it and learn without even realising. They have then (so far) adjusted to homework without any hassle. I haven't ever had to fight my children on homework. In fact, one of my kids presented a power point to the school assembly...it wasn't a set project, just the case of a child who learnt something at school and wanted to extend on that learning, so came home and made a project on it. The teacher was so proud it was presented at the school assembly. Another child of mine asks our neighbour (who is a teacher) to bring home maths work from older years at her school, just for the challenge. Perhaps my kids would have always fostered a love of learning outside of school, but I believe it's because of our relaxed approach, and that they have never had negative feelings associated with homework that has fostered this love.
    I'm not trying to get you to change your mind either...it's just food for thought ☺

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  4. #33
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    Default What are your thoughts about homework?

    Quote Originally Posted by Full House View Post
    I'm not a teacher, but on your first point (and purely anecdotal evidence), my kids didn't have homework as the norm until year 5. So far, my kids have adjusted to this really well. We do projects in the early years, but not sheets of homework. I've listened to my friends complain that that ten minutes of homework drags out to half an hour or more when their child doesn't want to do it.
    There's research to support that there are no benefits to homework before year 5. We're not free range when it comes to our kids education at all, but in those early years it's so easy to incorporate learning in to play. The kids love it and learn without even realising. They have then (so far) adjusted to homework without any hassle. I haven't ever had to fight my children on homework. In fact, one of my kids presented a power point to the school assembly...it wasn't a set project, just the case of a child who learnt something at school and wanted to extend on that learning, so came home and made a project on it. The teacher was so proud it was presented at the school assembly. Another child of mine asks our neighbour (who is a teacher) to bring home maths work from older years at her school, just for the challenge. Perhaps my kids would have always fostered a love of learning outside of school, but I believe it's because of our relaxed approach, and that they have never had negative feelings associated with homework that has fostered this love.
    I'm not trying to get you to change your mind either...it's just food for thought ☺
    More than happy to have my mind changed, my DD doesn't start until next year so I'm trying to educate myself on both sides of the fence.

    I did really like your earlier post and leaving it until year 5. I think it's the sticker for the rules in me that wouldn't ever dream of telling my kids to purposely not do something the teacher asked of them. I just don't want my parenting decisions to get them in trouble at school but I've not been to school for 16 years so I don't know how it works now I'm a semi-old fart!

  5. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by A-Squared View Post
    More than happy to have my mind changed, my DD doesn't start until next year so I'm trying to educate myself on both sides of the fence.

    I did really like your earlier post and leaving it until year 5. I think it's the sticker for the rules in me that wouldn't ever dream of telling my kids to purposely not do something the teacher asked of them. I just don't want my parenting decisions to get them in trouble at school but I've not been to school for 16 years so I don't know how it works now I'm a semi-old fart!
    My mum was a stickler for the rules, so it does seem strange to me, but I just spoke to each teacher in the first week of school, let them know that whilst we value our child's education, we didn't believe in homework until year 5. I told them they were welcome to send homework home, and if my child wanted to do it they could, but if they didn't they weren't to be punished for it. I let them know that I would be checking in with them to ensure my child was keeping up with their peers, and that if I had concerns I'd approach them. One of my kids has had some tutoring as they've found some subjects difficult. Their teacher actually had no concerns, but my child was telling us that they were finding some parts of the subject difficult, so we got tutoring just to make life easier for them. Being against homework doesn't mean disengaging from school. Do some research and then make up your own mind as to what path you'll take 😁

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  7. #35
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    I dont have a problem with a little bit of homework. My dd's school are not strict with it and are happy for the kids to do as much or as little as they want.
    They do ask you to sit with your child and read to/with them each night. But again I dont see this as a problem.
    My dd loves doing spelling so I let her do as much as she wants but has gone off her home readers so she is reading Dr Zeuss books instead

  8. #36
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    I think it's a bit ridiculous before year 8-9.

    My DSSs (in years 2 and 4) get lots of homework.

  9. #37
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    It should be optional. I don't agree on children being in school all day and then coming home to do more work. They need time to relax, play, spend time together as a family...
    But if your children are happy to do a little bit each night (or when they want) and it's not stressing everyone out then I don't see a problem.

    When my kids were at school, homework was a battling ordeal. Now though they are happy to write stories and songs, help with the budget and whatever else so I know they're learning...

  10. #38
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    Also I don't think kids should be punished for not doing it, teachers don't know what's going on in someone's lives, perhaps they can't do tjeir homework for a variety of reasons. I don't think bribery is good either.

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  12. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by BornToBe View Post
    I really don't get why we need it. Does it mean the school system is failing to educate children "enough" in that 6 hours a day they are already attending? Why does it need an additional hour to cut into family time in the evening? I remember when I was a teenager, there was no way I'd give up that couple hours of daylight after school so I was always the one cramming in homework before class in the morning or on the train on the way to school. I think kids need time to just "be" and if we really need homework than we also need a rethink of what is happening in those 9am-3pm hours. And perhaps a rethink of what is expected of teachers during that time...
    One of the many reasons I chose to homeschool.

  13. #40
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    My kids don't do much homework, at home. I have always refused to make a fight of it. I actually leave it up to them as to whether they do it or not (yr 5 and 7). I have always said that if they don't do their homework then they have to deal with whatever consequence their teacher dishes out (they're at a public school - the homework load is pretty minimal). Neither of my older children likes to be taught by me...but love having homework help from their uncle.
    My DD is fairly clever, finishes her class work quickly and does her homework at school.. always has done. This practice is catching up with her a bit in high school and she is gradually developing a study/homework routine. I leave her to it.
    My DS struggles with homework...He hates it, so mostly doesn't do it, although he is slowly improving. Once again, I let him decide. If he gets in trouble at school for not doing it, he doesn't tell me and his teachers haven't complained.
    As per a PP I don't think there should be homework before yr5...


 

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