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  1. #31
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    That's exactly my point, you're in control of sending them, why not give them the best start you can.

    I think the government needs to fund pre schools and make them compulsory before school.

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    Little Miss Sunshine  (20-08-2016)

  3. #32
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    Default Delay entry to school (5/6yr)

    Quote Originally Posted by Kaybaby View Post
    Is pre-primary (or the yr before Y1, whatever it's called in other states) not play - based in other states? In WA it's almost entirely play - based...no desks, no home readers until the 2nd half of the year (or at all depending on teacher), obviously there is a a curriculum but it's taught through play-based learning.
    No, in NSW it is not and so I would always recommend a 4 year old stay at home another year.

    Here's the NSW literacy continuum. Children are expected to achieve cluster 4 by the end of "pre primary" or kindergarten (first year of compulsory schooling in NSW)
    http://www.curriculumsupport.educati...ontin_2012.pdf

  4. #33
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    I'm in QLD and prep is full on here. At my daughter's school they have home readers, sight words and homework sheet from week 2 of prep, 45min daily reading groups and heavily structured learning. My DS2 won't be starting until he is 5 turning 6. If it was play based, I'd have no issue with sending him at 4 turning 5.

  5. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    No, in NSW it is not and so I would always recommend a 4 year old stay at home another year.

    Here's the NSW literacy continuum. Children are expected to achieve cluster 4 by the end of "pre primary" or kindergarten (first year of compulsory schooling in NSW)
    http://www.curriculumsupport.educati...ontin_2012.pdf
    Mm interesting...I'm not a teacher but I'm sure the expectations are not that high in Pre Primary (4.5yo-5.5yo) in WA (maybe level 3), although I just had a quick look online and it looks like a new curriculum is being rolled out next year. My youngest starts full -time school next year in Pre-primary and I really hope it is still mostly play based...
    Last edited by Kaybaby; 20-08-2016 at 23:26.

  6. #35
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    Default Delay entry to school (5/6yr)

    Quote Originally Posted by Reneeharry View Post
    I think the government needs to fund pre schools and make them compulsory before school.
    Not necessarily directed at you Renee, your post has sparked a train of thought...

    Why should preschool be compulsory and publicly funded? Are they useful or essential in preparing kids for kindy?

    Is the problem with the age debate that people were sending their children to school too young (4/5)? or that kindy programs weren't appropriate for that age group? And hence some parents started to feel the pressure to send their child later?

    Or is the issue that some kids weren't adequately prepared for kindy? (no preschool spent most of their time at home with one caregiver, part time preschool).

    Is it really about age? Or is it about other issues shifting the bar over time? Or is it a combination?

  7. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reneeharry View Post
    My bubs was born in Jan,8 weeks early she should be a March baby. I have a choice to send her when she's just turned 5 or 6. Who knows what I'll do I've got years to decide. I'm thinking she will start when she's 6. !
    One thing I've learned is don't pidgeon hole your child into a parenting philosophy from the get go. Don't vow when your kid is 4 weeks old that you are going to delay solids until they are 7 months. Don't Vow when they are 1 week old that you will always only give your baby breastmilk. You never know what will happen and how your child will change as they get older. The best plan is to vow to go by the signs your child is exhibiting. If they are 5.5 months old, chewing their hands, eyeing off your steak and waking every 2 hours at night for a milk feed then give them some solids already! If they are 4 years 11 months, playing Beethoven on the piano and writing a phd thesis on the interactions between adults on a social media forum then let them start kindy already!

  8. #37
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    In WA kindy (or pre-school ) has always been publicly funded (almost free) but not compulsory. It is 5 days a fortnight and I don't know anyone who doesn't sent their child to pre-school. I think it makes sense to have children do an entirely play-based school readiness program, to help socially and help them learn school routine and structure. Almost all pre-schools are part of the Early Learning Centres at the Primary schools. Maybe the whole age issue would be less of a problem with this schooling structure. It would be really hard for a child of 4/5/6 to go from home to fully structured school days. My kids would find it stressful and tiring.

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    Long time watcher and not often poster.

    I'm in the NT, I've been a teacher for around 7 years. I have a May boy who I am keeping back, here were some of the factors that I considered.

    Play based learning is usually prevalent in pre school settings, there are many benchmarks that kids are now expected to reach in Transition, I think that might be kinder. In the schools I have taught in, it's sit down at your desks and listen. My son is not developmental ready to be doing this, and I don't want to force him to.

    Future issues, I was always the youngest of my peers and there was often an expectation that I'd keep up. I was often lagging behind in maturity and academically.

    What's one more year in the scheme of things? Sure, my kid will be older but how does that affect you or your child, I'm exercising my rights.

    As a teacher, I've often had to have a list with students and their birthdays. It's been so common for the younger kids in the class, particularly boys to demonstrate behaviours that indicate low maturity levels. This list has helped me time and time again as a friendly reminder that these kids are younger. Another thing that it's usually reminded me of is why they aren't hitting certain benchmarks.

    I'm pretty certain with my decision to delay schooling, this hasn't been taken lightly and I've read A LOT of research and spoken with other experienced educators.

    Now what I was getting to was that I would hate to think that people were judging me on my decision for my child, this was not a factor my my decision for my child nor should it be. It's also not drastic, it's been carefully considered and for my family the pros outweigh the cons.

  10. #39
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    Lots of people in my area send the kids to the 'ELC' so fancy private school which you get Centrelink rebates for. Then transition kids to kindy (different schools etc). I get worried about moving different places etc. it's all apparently play based. The primary school is too at 12,000 a year lmao!

  11. #40
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    Well after lots of reading / research and speaking with his kinder teacher, I am sending DS next year (turning 5 mid-Feb).
    It wasn't an easy decision, I had some sleepless nights.

    - He's very confident...just needs the next couple of months to be less reactive (screams when his brother annoys him), we've started a reward chart for this at home with his older brother.
    - He visits the school x3 days a week am/pm when his brother goes to school, so he is familiar with the environment
    - He is getting bored at home and always asks for his iPad (which we restrict)
    - He is tall for his age (some parents worry about their child being the small one)
    - Academically he can: (I know not as important as social).
    - count by 2's to 20
    - count from 1 to 100
    - recognises the alphabet (we're working on small caps)
    - is beginning to sound and read 3 letter words (My oldest who is an August baby couldn't do any of that!) and lots of 2-3 letter sight words.
    - I'm also a high school teacher and have looked and compared the ages of kids (boys aged 12-14) who are doing well / not so well and honestly there's variations in there ages. Some that are doing well started school Jan/Feb, some were delayed, same with the boys not doing so well.
    Also the cut off is end April so my boy meets that.

    He's still enrolled to repeat kinder, so I still have time to still change my mind if I need to.
    Last edited by 2BlueBirds; 21-08-2016 at 12:43.


 
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