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  1. #41
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    This is an interesting study, and gives quite a well rounded view.

    https://www.researchgate.net/profile...1668000000.pdf

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    It's actually very rare to have an 18 month age gap and as a parent who also happens to be a primary school teacher, I am glad I got the choice to keep 2 of my kids home another year as opposed to other states where I wouldn't have had a choice. The fact remains that still only a very small percentage of parents keep their child home another year, vast majority of parents send their child to school the year they are eligible to start.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    It's actually very rare to have an 18 month age gap and as a parent who also happens to be a primary school teacher, I am glad I got the choice to keep 2 of my kids home another year as opposed to other states where I wouldn't have had a choice. The fact remains that still only a very small percentage of parents keep their child home another year, vast majority of parents send their child to school the year they are eligible to start.
    Is that across the board? In our area, it's the complete opposite...most kids are 5 turning 6 when they start school where I'm from.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Full House View Post
    Is that across the board? In our area, it's the complete opposite...most kids are 5 turning 6 when they start school where I'm from.
    Yep. In NSW the statistic is something like 7% of children are "held back" and less than 3% in Queensland. Around 10% in Victoria from memory.

    Usually the children who are held back have parents who are educated and wealthy. Childcare costs is a major contributing factor and obviously wealthier people can afford daycare fees for another year.

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    There are several reasons why European, especially the Scandinavian countries are trouncing us education wise. They don't do standardised testing like NAPLAN, instead favouring in class assessment by teachers (which I completely agree with). They start later in age, they have shorter days, and they have generally less pressure to perform which it turn, makes them perform better.

    The sad thing is that most younger teachers subscribe to the Finnish/Dutch approach to learning but they are bound by Dept of Education rules on curriculum etc.

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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    There are several reasons why European, especially the Scandinavian countries are trouncing us education wise. They don't do standardised testing like NAPLAN, instead favouring in class assessment by teachers (which I completely agree with). They start later in age, they have shorter days, and they have generally less pressure to perform which it turn, makes them perform better.

    The sad thing is that most younger teachers subscribe to the Finnish/Dutch approach to learning but they are bound by Dept of Education rules on curriculum etc.
    Is it true they don't believe in homework also? Or is that just a rumour?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Full House View Post
    Is that across the board? In our area, it's the complete opposite...most kids are 5 turning 6 when they start school where I'm from.
    We have an interesting cross section SES wise at our school. Traditionally the school is low SES, and still on paper is. But with the amazing performance of our school has seen higher SES families moving catchments and from private schools to access ours. So we have the poorest, but also an increasing group of middle/high middle income families.

    This is purely anecdotal for our school, but fairly accurate as I have a lot of school involvement, and most of the younger kids are from the low SES families, while the higher SES/educated families hold their kids back.

    Before people get upset that I'm saying only the 'ferals' send their kids early - I'm not. I'm just saying for *our* school that a high proportion of the early intake kids are from low SES families.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MrsSS View Post
    Is it true they don't believe in homework also? Or is that just a rumour?
    I can only speak for the teachers I've done placement with, and the students I've studied with who have gone out to teach - but from my experience - no most younger teachers do not like homework, feel it's a waste of time and just 'busy work' and that primary kids should be playing and spending time having fun.

    Research also shows zero positive effect until Year 10-12

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    Yep. In NSW the statistic is something like 7% of children are "held back" and less than 3% in Queensland. Around 10% in Victoria from memory.

    Usually the children who are held back have parents who are educated and wealthy. Childcare costs is a major contributing factor and obviously wealthier people can afford daycare fees for another year.
    Well, I stand corrected. But the area I live in is primarily well educated, middle or middle upper class families, so I guess that's why I see kids starting at 5, not 4.

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    Tasmania wants to start kids at 4.5 it's just going through now.

    Dd and ds will be 4 turning 5 for school so I guess I have to wait and see how we go. Both kids goto childcare etc. I make sure I pay for extra help etc

    Dd is more than ready she got told she could start already!! But I don't think her impulsiveness is etc like cracking the shuts etc


 

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