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  1. #31
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    I don't at all factor in social issues in my decision. When kids are older they will be friends with people of many different ages and being at school with varying aged children isn't a problem to me.

    My kids also have cousins and other friends the same age as them through mum's group so it's not like they will only have school friends.

    There are far too many variables in how our kids will be socially than just their age.

  2. #32
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    Default What age to start school?

    I'd be curious to know if anyone can actually provide some concrete figures/research backing up delaying your child actually makes a difference in the long run.
    Early years, maybe.

    The reason I ask is I went to a selective academic high school (not to toot my own horn or anything) and I was surprised how many of us were "younger" ie turning 18 in the first six months after year 12 in comparison to my local bogan primary school.

    Were we sent younger as we were "bright" and more ready than our peers? Or does it actually make no difference in the end and everyone is getting their knickers in a knot over nothing?
    Last edited by Little Miss Sunshine; 17-08-2016 at 21:51.

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  4. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Little Miss Sunshine View Post
    I'd be curious to know if anyone can actually provide some concrete figures/research backing up delaying your child actually makes a difference in the long run.
    Early years, maybe.

    The reason I ask is I went to a selective academic high school (not to toot my own horn or anything) and I was surprised how many of us were "younger" ie turning 18 after year 12 in comparison to my local bogan primary school.

    Were we sent younger as we were "bright" and more ready than our peers? Or does it actually not make no difference in the end and everyone is getting their knickers in a knot over nothing?
    Good question. I think there are sooooo many variables that it's impossible to have a policy that will suit every child.

    There will always be kids with varying levels of reading, writing, drawing, self regulation skills etc. some kids may be advanced for their age in some things and behind in others.

    They don't just all magically have the exact same abilities and social skills the day they turn 5.

    With regards to research, there very well could be because in many European countries they don't make school compulsory (or start) prior to 6 and even 7 years of age. I'm sure that policy is based in some type of research.

    I also wouldn't have an issue if they said all kids had to be 6 at a cut off date, but what ever age it is, just make it consistent across the country and don't allow parents to choose (other than in cases with kids with special needs - there should be some way of individually assessing their readiness)

  5. #34
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    I think those who are quite bright are still going to fair quite well even being younger. But there are lots of younger kids who are not doing well. I had a conversation with a principal who I know quite well who told me that the younger students a) consistently perform worse academically and socially and b) that a large proportion of the young ones should not have been sent early but schools are forced to take them. eta that doesn't mean *all* youngens perform badly, just that of the group struggling that many are young for their grade and that the parents have blinkers on.

    There is quite a body of evidence that starting later sees kids perform better all the way through school, I remember reading them as part of my readings in my first year of uni but it's late and I don't think I saved them. If I have time tomorrow I might see if I can find some of it, but it is true
    Last edited by delirium; 17-08-2016 at 21:57.

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  7. #35
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    In WA there's a fixed cut-off, you can't hold back at all. The cut off date is 30th June.
    Kindy 3.5-4.5yrs (not compulsory - 15hrs/week, fully paid for by state)
    Pre Primary (compulsory)4.5-5.5
    Yr 1 5.5-6.5yrs

    Seems to work...and no one gets bogged down in the "big decision" that comes up so often on the forum.
    (Although I whinged big time as my DS2 is born 5th July..so 5 days too young to go to school! I can't wait for him to start full time school...he's driving me crazy at home and needs the stimulation)

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  9. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Little Miss Sunshine View Post
    I'd be curious to know if anyone can actually provide some concrete figures/research backing up delaying your child actually makes a difference in the long run.
    Early years, maybe.

    The reason I ask is I went to a selective academic high school (not to toot my own horn or anything) and I was surprised how many of us were "younger" ie turning 18 in the first six months after year 12 in comparison to my local bogan primary school.

    Were we sent younger as we were "bright" and more ready than our peers? Or does it actually make no difference in the end and everyone is getting their knickers in a knot over nothing?
    Here's one...

    Australia currently ranks 14th in the world in education.

    Every single country that ranks above us has a school starting age of at least 6, some 7 or even 8.

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  11. #37
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    Default What age to start school?

    Not that I don't believe you but do you have a reference or is this anecdotal.

    I wouldn't have a problem if it was the year they turn 6, just don't make it a choice

    Also @delerium if most of the youngest ones are having problems or issues or are a bit 'behind', can the general
    Curriculum not be changed to match the actual age of children starting school.

    The general consensus on here is that parents don't care if their kid gets a bit bore if they're older. If this is the case, change the curriculum in those first few years?

  12. #38
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    I have a May baby and a July baby and they both started the year they turned 6.

  13. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    Here's one...

    Australia currently ranks 14th in the world in education.

    Every single country that ranks above us has a school starting age of at least 6, some 7 or even 8.
    I wouldn't think we ranked that badly purely because we start school younger ? I think there are a lot more reasons!

    I still think it's based on the child, DS could easily have started earlier if he was allowed , he's thriving at school and I was 16 in year 12 and had no problems - I have heard of people sending kids younger just to save on day care fees which is a whole other problem!

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  15. #40
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    Default What age to start school?

    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    Here's one...

    Australia currently ranks 14th in the world in education.

    Every single country that ranks above us has a school starting age of at least 6, some 7 or even 8.
    I don't think that really proves it? What are other countries early childhood program's like? Are they similar to ours? I struggle to believe kids just sit at home till they are 6/7.
    If we changed the school starting age would it actually improve our rankings? I highly doubt it. So many variables are at play here including quality of education and curriculum.

    What I want to see is "x" age did this well in high school/hsc and "x" age went to higher education etc. and see if there is a considerable difference.

    But anyway I think I'm digressing from my original point. The problem I have is the 18 month gap, lack of blanket rule. It shouldn't be a parental choice/decision for when kids start school, it should be uniform (obviously apart from special needs).


 

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