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  1. #1
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    Default Q about development

    DS is 25 months and is just on the cusp of normal development for his age (going by checklists of things they should be able to do by age 2). I don't know if he's just on the low end of the bell curve or if he's actually got a developmental/speech delay that should be looked in to.
    Do I talk to our GP? The ECHC? I haven't been there since he was a newborn, is a toddler checkup/screening the sort of thing they do there?

    I've asked his daycare and they're not concerned about him but he is behind his peers. It's mostly his speech, but he doesn't show many other signs of intelligence in the way he plays either.
    There's a few family members with ASD so that's always been something to watch out for, but he doesn't obviously meet that criteria either.
    Socially/emotionally he's fine, happy, lots of secure relationships.

    I don't know if I'm being appropriately cautious or just being impatient that his development isn't going as fast as I'd like, leaving me stuck in the crappy baby/toddler stage for longer than I can handle :-/

    Ugh what should I do, look into getting him assessed or just be patient?
    I'm happy to elaborate on anything if that helps.

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    It's tricky isn't it. When do you intervene and what's just the spectrum of normal development? If you've got a good gp then it can't hurt to have a chat with them. If speech is the main issue I'd be asking for a referral to a speech path just to check things out.

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    deku  (20-07-2016)

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    I stressed so much about DS's speech. He barely talked until he was about 27/28 months and I considered getting him checked out. Then literally overnight he just started talking and now he doesn't shut up!

    But, I would always suggest getting it checked out if you are worried.

    What did you mean by signs of intelligence?

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    deku  (20-07-2016)

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    Deku my DS is younger than yours (22 months) but he is also behind in speech development. He is supposed to have ~100 words, making 2 word sentences etc but he doesn't even have 10 words let alone 2 word sentences (besides bye-bye which they don't count). His speech seems to have stalled in the last few months (no new words) which concerns me.

    I started off my taking him to the MHCN who agreed that he does appear to have a speech delay. She referred us to the public speech path. but where I am the wait list is over 3 months. We paid for a private speech assessment ($200 for an hour) to get the ball rolling and the speechie came back with saying yes, he has a delay and will need some assistance/ongoing support. She referred us back to the GP for paed and hearing test referrals.

    Our GP wasn't fussed on his minor gross motor skill delay (also found by the MHCN, he feels that DS is within normal range) but said we need to get his speech dealt with. We have decided to go through the public system for ongoing speech appointments (private is VERY expensive) so are waiting for his initial assessment appointment in October (with a speech and OT) and the paed assessment (we are going private with this, but again, huge wait list, even with a private paed).

    It's been a really long few weeks trying to get everything lined up and the wait lists are long, even in private practice - we were looking at a 3 month wait to see a speech pathologist (managed to get in earlier on a cancelled appointment though). Hearing tests there was a 5 month wait in the public system so we are paying to go private with that as well as it needs to be done before his next speech appointment, even still its been hard to get him in somewhere.

    After that long winded post, if you are concerned its best getting them checked early by either the MHCN or your GP. If they need support it can take a really long time to access it (even in private) which I didn't realise. I find that DS is getting super frustrated at not being able to communicate well and his is getting more whiny and whingy the longer he is unable to tell us anything, so I'd prefer to get this sorted now than wait any longer and risk him falling further behind.

    HTH - feel free to ask any Qs!

    ETA: Daycare are also not concerned re speech, however with the GP, Speech and MHCN all saying he has a delay we have decided to go ahead with appointments. You don't need a referral to see a private speech path but will need one for public and hearing tests (which they will ask you to do).
    Last edited by Pearlygirl; 19-07-2016 at 18:29.

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    I would get the ball rolling on speech therapy. Start with a GP appointment and go from there.

    Sounds like you feel he's behind, and I would encourage you to trust your motherly instincts.

    If he suddenly explodes with speech on his own - great! But if he doesn't you will already have support in place to give him the help he needs.

    After my own experiences with my DS, I do not believe in the 'relax and wait' approach that many other people advise. If there is something more serious at play, early intervention is vital.

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    deku  (20-07-2016)

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    Thanks for the replies
    And for the all the details @Pearlygirl, that's really helpful!
    I mentioned to our GP when we went for his 18 month vaxes that he only had one word at the time ("uh oh!"), and at the time the advice was to wait until he's 2 and reassess. I counted up all the words I could think of that he says and got to 40, I probably missed some so let's say 50 which is not bad. One 2 word sentence ("more cracker/trains/etc!") So it's either normal or a bit low, there's so many different quotes of what the normal range is.

    Quote Originally Posted by harvs View Post
    What did you mean by signs of intelligence?
    Things like he can't (or possibly won't?) stack blocks, or do puzzles or the shape-sorter toys, respond to his name, he doesn't appear to engage in pretend/imaginative play - with the exception of offering food and clothes to his favourite toy bear and pretending that I am the Island of Sodor and need trains driven over my head He doesn't really have interest in toys or games other than rough physical play, pulling things off shelves/out of drawers and lining all his trains up. He'll respond to some questions or instructions and make eye contact but only if he's initiated the interaction, if that makes sense?
    But I don't know if he actually can't do those things or just doesn't want to, he could just have inherited an introverted, independent personality type.
    He was a super serious baby too, he didn't smile or laugh for months after the "normal" age. Not that he was unhappy or cried, he seemed perfectly content, just aloof.

    But it's also very reassuring that people who are clearly very good parents, and are intelligent and educated and have provided a great environment to their children can still end up with late bloomers/speech delays. Because that's always a niggling concern in the back of my mind, did we screw up somehow and hinder his development? I'm sure we didn't, but I think it's a pretty normal thought. I haven't naturally taken to motherhood but I've really tried hard with him, as far as I know we've done everything right in terms of parenting and environment. I think I'm just getting frustrated that it doesn't appear to be paying off yet?
    Aaaanyway. I'm just venting.

    Thanks again for the replies. He's probably fine but I might make an appointment with our GP, she's pretty popular so that alone will be a month's wait!

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    @deku - just thought I'd give you an update. We found out DS has moderate hearing loss which at this point they think is causing the speech delays. He needs follow up with an ENT and paed + speech therapy to get him on track and will most likely need surgery to fix it. I was really surprised at them finding hearing loss tbh as I didn't think he had any. Anyway worth looking into if you are still concerned as it could be something like hearing loss - even a mild hearing loss can significantly impact on speech and language development.
    Last edited by Pearlygirl; 01-08-2016 at 13:25.

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