Tell me about the "Safe Schools" program | Page 5 | Bub Hub
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  1. #41
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    Ok so I've read all the replies now. Not sure I want to get involved as I just don't know enough about the topic and don't want to offend anyone. But as someone who had only vaguely heard about safe schools program before, this has been an eye opener for sure! Definitely not what I thought it was (for starters, I didn't know it had anything to do with transgender issues or homosexuality. I was under the impression it was about bullying in general.
    I'll have to do some reading up about child appropriate conversations so I can prepare my kids.
    What age should parents start talking about sex with their children?
    I agree with comments earlier in this thread about parents having to teach their children about diversity and acceptance from an early age in the home. People aren't born homophobic or bigoted. It's definitely a learned mindset. The SSP sounds like something that society as a whole would benefit from if it parents were the ones to sit through it.

  2. #42
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    Just because someone disagrees with the SSP does not make that person "homophobic" nor should they be subject to vilification. Just because you understand the intricate nature of what constitutes the gender debate in today's society doesn't mean your 6 year old does despite whatever confidence you may have in them of being able to. Sorry, doesn't happen. Simply put, not everything is suitable for a classroom situation for kids in early childhood.

    And just because parents and a school are not in favour of the Safe Schools program and for reasons already explicitly expressed, does not mean that the subject of body diversity, bullying and other issues are shoved under the carpet.

    At the school my child is in we have a programme called "Every Body is Different" which is an age appropriate segmented learning module that covers gender identity, family and all the different shapes this takes (eg. same sex parents, fostering, kinship care, single parenting etc), protective behaviours (showing them that their body is special and when touch is and isn't appropriate), bullying, online grooming and other issues that pertain to being a kid growing up in a rapidly changing world.

    The operative phrase is 'being a kid'.

    The module is geared for the mindset and environment suitable for under 8s. It doesn't force them to role play outside their known experience, it doesn't force them to make decisions they don't understand, it doesn't force them to be subjected to an ideal they may not agree with if they knew what it meant. It wasn't written by a group with a specific political agenda, was written by people with teaching qualifications and experience (SSP is not) and is governed by the school as opposed to an outside group, is delivered with the support of community health and the Dept of Ed, involves an integrated delivery across the curriculum and encapsulates a very simple message in an easy to understand way for little kids which is -

    people are different,
    this is how they're different,
    let's understand/respect that and
    we'll show you how.


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  4. #43
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    wow, what an eye opener. thanks for the info Mrs Tickle. there's no way i'd send my child to a school with this program. the last thing I want for my son is for him to think he needs to have his pen!s removed because he likes pink or dolls or is attracted to boys or whatever. I also don't want other kids telling him he is a girl and should use the girls toilets if he doesn't conform to gender stereotypes. I also have a problem with kids just wandering into the locker room of the opposite sex because they've been taught that gender has no meaning other than what is in their head.
    Gender fluidity is an extremely complicated idea, it's ridiculous to think that primary school children can understand it to the degree that the program seems to be teaching.

  5. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mrs Tickle View Post

    At the school my child is in we have a programme called "Every Body is Different" which is an age appropriate segmented learning module that covers gender identity, family and all the different shapes this takes (eg. same sex parents, fostering, kinship care, single parenting etc), protective behaviours (showing them that their body is special and when touch is and isn't appropriate), bullying, online grooming and other issues that pertain to being a kid growing up in a rapidly changing world.

    The operative phrase is 'being a kid'.

    The module is geared for the mindset and environment suitable for under 8s. It doesn't force them to role play outside their known experience, it doesn't force them to make decisions they don't understand, it doesn't force them to be subjected to an ideal they may not agree with if they knew what it meant. It wasn't written by a group with a specific political agenda, was written by people with teaching qualifications and experience (SSP is not) and is governed by the school as opposed to an outside group, is delivered with the support of community health and the Dept of Ed, involves an integrated delivery across the curriculum and encapsulates a very simple message in an easy to understand way for little kids which is -

    people are different,
    this is how they're different,
    let's understand/respect that and
    we'll show you how.

    I love the sound of this program! Do you know if this is a standard program for schools to implement (obviously it would be different in each school if it's designed by that specific school & community). I know my son's primary school that he will start next year has an anti-bullying program but I don't know much more than that. How can I find out more? Should I just contact the principal or is this something that is generally written somewhere on the school website?


 

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