+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 24
  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    my house
    Posts
    17,696
    Thanks
    1,391
    Thanked
    7,285
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Homeschooling4 View Post
    Ok, well have him looked at then. But you still can't (or shouldn't) force children to learn.

    Each to their own.
    He loves learning. The op has posted again and says he has a tutor and he loves it.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    41
    Thanks
    61
    Thanked
    20
    Reviews
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Homeschooling4 View Post
    Just relax. He's only 6. He will learn to read in his own time.
    As someone who has spent countless years ensuring my child is receiving the best support for learning difficulties, I must say this is exactly what NOT to do and is the reason why some children struggle more and more as they get older because they were not given options for early interventions! Play learning is not the solution.

    At six years of age it is when they are getting right into reading and maths, it's a big focus for them at school. If they are not supported in areas of difficulty now it will be a lot worse when they are older.

    If it is a public school they should have a learning support program, with the ability to put a child on an ICP (individual curriculum program), tailoring it to their needs after they've done an assessment to see where they are for a particular subject. The more evidence you can provide them (eg speech and language assessment) the easier it will be to get the support.

    I would be making an appointment to see the Principal based on the feedback you received from the teacher.

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to baby245 For This Useful Post:

    SSecret Squirrel  (08-07-2016)

  4. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    291
    Thanks
    62
    Thanked
    63
    Reviews
    0
    Yeah, wait til he gets a teacher he hates.

  5. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    1,008
    Thanks
    777
    Thanked
    773
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Homeschooling4 View Post
    Ok, well have him looked at then. But you still can't (or shouldn't) force children to learn.

    Each to their own.
    It's not forcing to learn though. If he has a learning difficulty he needs understanding and support.

  6. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    my house
    Posts
    17,696
    Thanks
    1,391
    Thanked
    7,285
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Homeschooling4 View Post
    Yeah, wait til he gets a teacher he hates.
    The tutor is not the teacher.

  7. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    41
    Thanks
    61
    Thanked
    20
    Reviews
    0

    Default School support of kids struggling with reading and maths?

    Quote Originally Posted by Homeschooling4 View Post
    Yeah, wait til he gets a teacher he hates.


    At least the teachers are university educated.
    Last edited by baby245; 08-07-2016 at 20:17.

  8. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to baby245 For This Useful Post:

    atomicmama  (08-07-2016),Californication  (09-07-2016)

  9. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    1,008
    Thanks
    777
    Thanked
    773
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    OP my DD is in year 6 and has learning difficulties stemming from having a very low birth weight and being born prematurely.

    I would suggest that as a starting point you talk to the teacher and find out what level of support the school can offer. I would be asking about a WISC (mainly because it would be around the $1000 mark if you were to pay an educational psychologist).

    Not sure what state you are in, but I took my DD to an OT who told me that Catholic schools in Qld have a different criteria for learning support over state schools. In a Qld state school for top level support, a child must be autistic, or more two standard deviations below average in speech or intellectual impairment. Apparently Catholic schools have a fourth criteria of social difficulities (I think that was what it was called anyway). This may work in your favour. Definitely check with the school.

    FWIW I chose my DD's school (public) specifically because it has a special ed unit. Unfortunately she doesn't qualify for help from the unit - criteria in qld is very specific. She has had literacy and maths support from the school over the years, but I have found it to be woefully inadequate.

    I've had to employ private speech pathologists to assist with literacy, an OT for years (DD has low muscle tone and finds writing difficult) and now she sees a special needs tutor through SPELD.

    Unfortunately in my DD's case no amount of support will "cure" her so my view on the school's help may be tainted.

    ETA just reread the OP. DD's school offers the following (may be more, this is what I am aware of):

    Special Ed unit for children with a diagnosed disability that meets Qld Dept Education criteria.

    Reading program called "Multi Lit". Means the kids are given extra readers and time with a teachers aide. (personally I found it useless as the readers DD was given were way too easy and did not lift her reading levels).

    Maths program called "Quick Smart". Flash cards with sums the kids need to rote learn and get 100% correct in a time limit. When they complete one level, they move up to the next.

    Part time teachers aids in all Prep classrooms

    Finger Gym - for developing fine motor skills

    Now DD is in year 6 she is getting one on one tutoring from a teacher once a week.
    Last edited by SSecret Squirrel; 08-07-2016 at 20:31.

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to SSecret Squirrel For This Useful Post:

    baby245  (08-07-2016)

  11. #18
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    532
    Thanks
    1,147
    Thanked
    172
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts

    Default School support of kids struggling with reading and maths?

    My son is in yr2 at a qld state school & is on an ICP. His school has taken so long to help him and his teacher still 'isn't sure' if she is allowed to show me his ICP do I can give a copy to our speechie :\

    He is taken out of class 3 times a week with a teacher aide for group learning time (6-7 kids) for literacy x2 and maths X1. The teacher aide is cranky and my son doesn't like going out with her.

    We started having my son assessed and found he has low working memory and possibly auditory processing disorder. He is on an ICP for literacy and maths so he is working at a year 1 level for those subjects, while he is still in year 2. Just got his report card for last term and he got a C for yr1 English and a B for year 1 maths, so he is behind but the school doesn't really take it that seriously

  12. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    2,264
    Thanks
    2,355
    Thanked
    1,880
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Homeschooling4 View Post
    Just relax. He's only 6. He will learn to read in his own time.
    And what if he doesn't just magically learn to read in his own time? He's behind, he's not catching up. His mum is worried and wants help. It's not going to happen by magic and not seeking further help risks him falling even further behind potentially snowballing into even bigger literacy problems and disadvantage.
    OP you're doing the right thing. It doesn't sound like you are getting far with the teacher so speaking to the principal about remedial programs seems like the next step. You mentioned your DDs teacher gave you some things to use is she in the same school? If so she might be useful for finding about the support programs available at that school. If you don't feel that they can meet your DSs learning needs long term would a school move be on the cards?

  13. The Following User Says Thank You to gingermillie For This Useful Post:

    misskittyfantastico  (08-07-2016)

  14. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    41
    Thanks
    61
    Thanked
    20
    Reviews
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by mrswhitehouse View Post
    My son is in yr2 at a qld state school & is on an ICP. His school has taken so long to help him and his teacher still 'isn't sure' if she is allowed to show me his ICP do I can give a copy to our speechie :\

    He is taken out of class 3 times a week with a teacher aide for group learning time (6-7 kids) for literacy x2 and maths X1. The teacher aide is cranky and my son doesn't like going out with her.

    We started having my son assessed and found he has low working memory and possibly auditory processing disorder. He is on an ICP for literacy and maths so he is working at a year 1 level for those subjects, while he is still in year 2. Just got his report card for last term and he got a C for yr1 English and a B for year 1 maths, so he is behind but the school doesn't really take it that seriously
    Just wanted to say you can be given a copy of the ICP. If they refuse, speak to principal and ask for reason why or ring your state education department as a last resort.

    I'd also be speaking to the Head of SEP re concerns about learning support teachers aide as they come under the SEP umbrella.

    I know you said started but if not completed I'd also highly recommend you book your DS in for a CAPD assessment with Australian Hearing (or similar) to confirm if he does have APD as they will be able to identify the areas of concerns, in addition to recommendations to assist him with these difficulties. My son (12) has an FM system, which is a very small blue tooth ear piece connected to a pen like microphone object the teacher wears around his neck so that it blocks background noise and he can hear instructions directly / clearly.


 

Similar Threads

  1. What do your school age kids do after school??
    By Freyamum in forum General Chat
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 05-02-2016, 19:00
  2. What are your kids reading?
    By CMF in forum General Chat
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 01-01-2016, 19:26
  3. 6 year old struggling at school.
    By missberry in forum Introductions
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 22-07-2015, 19:57

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Springfree Trampoline
Give the Ultimate Christmas Gift Springfree Trampoline
The World's Safest Trampoline™ is now also the world's first Smart Trampoline™. Sensors on the mat detect your every move and your jumps control fun, educational and active games on tablet. Secure the Ultimate Christmas Gift today!
sales & new stuffsee all
Bub Hub Sales Listing
HAVING A SALE? Let parents know about it with a Bub Hub Sales listing. Listings are featured on our well trafficked Sales Page + selected randomly to appear on EVERY page
featured supporter
Heinz Baby Basics
Our BPA Free range offers you a choice for every stage of your baby’s feeding development. You’ll love our brilliant colours, inspired designs and innovative features. Heinz Baby Basics caters for your baby’s needs!
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!