+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    972
    Thanks
    536
    Thanked
    343
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts

    Default Long term out of the workforce?

    Just curious about people's experiences if they've been out of paid work for some time - whether sahp / unemployed / disability...

    I'm about 9 years sahm. Dd2 is only 2 so without a job / career to go back into I'm not really thinking of a job before she starts school but need to start thinking and planning. Atm we don't need me to work but I don't know if that will change in the future. It feels so weird to be so financially dependent. But also with 3 kids to consider re childcare and generally trying to keep up with the house I don't know if I'm likely to really he able to contribute financially for some time and I'm already 43! When my youngest starts primary my oldest will just be starting high school. It's hard to imagine being able to really get my teeth into a new career.

    Think I'm rambling now but wonder if many others have had this long term break from work and gone back or done something else? Dd2 is doing a few hours at cc and I love the break but even those few hours the house feels too quiet and lonely lol!!!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    142
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked
    31
    Reviews
    0
    Following- interested in any advice. As I have been stay at home for 4.5 years already and planning on being at home for probably another 5/10 years.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    2,720
    Thanks
    1,518
    Thanked
    1,950
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    My mum went back to work after about 18 years at home. She trained as an aged carer, then worked for agencies. There's a lot of demand for staff in aged care. She loved it, and also got into working with people with acquired brain injuries.

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to Renn For This Useful Post:

    Freyamum  (15-06-2016)

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    265
    Thanks
    23
    Thanked
    40
    Reviews
    0
    I went back after 8.5yrs SAH (youngest was 1.5yo atm)as I felt guilty that DH was working 2 or 3 jobs, and never seeing his family. The idea was that I would find something that would work around his hours as he was the main breadwinner, but would give me the outlet I needed. I ended up doing nightfill at a supermarket 15mins away. I'm not home too late (last shift finishes at midnight). After a few months there, I was asked to be trained in the Deli department, which has given me the opportunity as the kids got older to pick up day work, and cut my night hours a little.

    I didn't find it that hard to find my job either, as I had a previously very good work and reference record. I had applied for 5 other jobs at different sites of the rival supermarket which I didn't get. Changed 1 thing on the application for the company that I am with now, and got the job.

    My MIL has been out of work (Basically/mostly) for 20+? years. When she went back as a casual teacher, she hated it, and set up a tutoring business which she enjoys instead

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to lolly137 For This Useful Post:

    Freyamum  (15-06-2016)

  7. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    202
    Thanks
    90
    Thanked
    86
    Reviews
    0
    Not in the same situation but I just noticed you said you are finding it 'hard to sink your teeth into a new career'. I am presuming you mean because of your age and time at home?

    I know someone who is around the same age as you who is currently in their last year of med school. When questioned about why 'so late in life' changing career paths the response was well I plan to be working for the next 20-30 years so that is a long time. Why not be doing something I love.

    So why you might feel it is 'late' to be starting something new, in reality its probably only half way through your working life You potentially have the next 20-30 years to work on your new career.

    Good luck

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to inner hippy For This Useful Post:

    Freyamum  (15-06-2016)

  9. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    972
    Thanks
    536
    Thanked
    343
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by inner hippy View Post
    Not in the same situation but I just noticed you said you are finding it 'hard to sink your teeth into a new career'. I am presuming you mean because of your age and time at home?

    I know someone who is around the same age as you who is currently in their last year of med school. When questioned about why 'so late in life' changing career paths the response was well I plan to be working for the next 20-30 years so that is a long time. Why not be doing something I love.

    So why you might feel it is 'late' to be starting something new, in reality its probably only half way through your working life You potentially have the next 20-30 years to work on your new career.

    Good luck
    Yes I totally agree with that! One of the reasons I feel spending some time really planning isn't a waste. I guess I was more thinking that with 3 kids and no family here, dp gone 7-7 I couldn't really commit to a full time job in a new field and really give it my all. A good friend has gone back to study and she loves it but even with only 2 school kids and family who help out she is snowed under with study and hardly has any family time. I suppose I want to find that balance, doesn't everyone?? Our house would be a full time job to keep it organised and clean. But I know I'd hate it if I was just home all day keeping house. My 2 year old is particularly demanding and clingy and messy atm. She doesn't really nap (except in car or on boob) and needs me to lie with her to sleep which is around 8.30/9pm so probably my view of what's possible is clouded somewhat by the fact I'm lucky to have an hour a day to myself and generally with housework / toddler activities / after school activities / homework / meals etc I'm going non stop... But maybe if I retrain and look to get stuck into a proper job when I'm around 50 it won't matter so much those 15 years out of workforce??

  10. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    4,109
    Thanks
    1,604
    Thanked
    2,085
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    My mum didn't get a "career" until her 40s after going to uni mature age. She has just retired after more than 20 years in that industry, which was well worth the 'late start'.

    Long ago the place I managed needed a part time admin, school hours suited our needs so really we were looking for a parent. The lady we chose hadn't had a paid job since having her 1st child 16 years ago but had studied some admin courses and done volunteer work. The lack of recent experience wasn't an issue for me as it was clear that she had kept busy while not "working" and as suspected she was an excellent, hardworking employee.

    It's important to note on the housekeeping side, when you leave at 7, kids are off in daycare/OSHC til whenever at night you have a lot less housework to do on those days. Staying on top of the washing is harder, but I only notice a big difference with the other stuff when I've got heaps on at work (eg. Report writing) or we have a busy weekend.

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to Stretched For This Useful Post:

    Freyamum  (15-06-2016)

  12. #8
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    2,669
    Thanks
    1,004
    Thanked
    2,412
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    I am younger than you, but I retrained after 7 years at home. Yes, studying with a family is hard...but it's only a few years and then you get a career out of it. Beats being stuck in a dead end job you hate for over a decade.

  13. The Following User Says Thank You to Full House For This Useful Post:

    Freyamum  (15-06-2016)

  14. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    265
    Thanks
    279
    Thanked
    40
    Reviews
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by inner hippy View Post
    Not in the same situation but I just noticed you said you are finding it 'hard to sink your teeth into a new career'. I am presuming you mean because of your age and time at home?

    I know someone who is around the same age as you who is currently in their last year of med school. When questioned about why 'so late in life' changing career paths the response was well I plan to be working for the next 20-30 years so that is a long time. Why not be doing something I love.

    So why you might feel it is 'late' to be starting something new, in reality its probably only half way through your working life You potentially have the next 20-30 years to work on your new career.

    Good luck
    Agree. I know someone who started med school at the same time as his son, in his late 40s.


 

Similar Threads

  1. Long Term TTC chat #3
    By Bubbles1984 in forum Conception & Fertility General Chat
    Replies: 473
    Last Post: 27-04-2016, 10:24
  2. How hard is it to find work after long term sahm??
    By Freyamum in forum Working Hubbers - Employed
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 23-04-2016, 08:36
  3. Would you be disappointed if your DD chose to be at home long term?
    By delirium in forum General Parenting Tips, Advice & Chat
    Replies: 172
    Last Post: 13-10-2015, 13:21

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Einsteinz Music
Make music at Einsteinz Music in age-appropriate class in Sydney's Inner West, Eastern Suburbs or North Shore. For ages 6 mths - 4 yrs. All music is live! Christmas Gift certificates available for full term or casual classes. Call 0431 338 143
sales & new stuffsee all
Wendys Music School Melbourne
Wondering about Music Lessons? FREE 30 minute ASSESSMENT. Find out if your child is ready! Piano from age 3 years & Guitar, Singing, Drums, Violin from age 5. Lessons available for all ages. 35+ years experience. Structured program.
Use referral 'bubhub' when booking
featured supporter
The Health Hub & Glowing Expectations
Glowing Expectations is conveniently located at The Health Hub in Darlinghurst. We offer pre & post natal personal training, small group pregnancy exercise classes, flexible mums & bubs sessions, massage, & naturopathy in our air-conditioned studio.
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!