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  1. #11
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    I believe CA is not ok if it's used to mock or satirise other cultures. For example turning up to a fancy dress party with Black Face singing Mammy. That's clearly racist and narrow minded. Or when someone knowingly cashes in on a cultural aspect while claiming to be that culture when they are not. For example someone who sells Indigenous dot art as just that, when in fact they are not Indigenous.

    My issue is whether any culture really owns a practice, a hair style or an art form? Egyptians apparently had dread locks, does that mean modern day African Americans are stealing dreadlocks? Interestingly, American Indigenous art is quite similar to our Aboriginals. The notion of Day of the Dead has lots of connections with Halloween, a pagan Irish day which has then become the culture of the Western world. So who actually owns the notion of celebrating the dead? Are African American women culturally appropriating western culture by straightening their hair?

    Furthermore, in the case the dread locked white teen, are we actually dissuading cultural diversity and acceptance by refusing to allow others to wear/eat/draw in our style? Or do minorities see it as 'diluting' their culture? Like others, I'm not from a minority group so am I entitled to even say?
    Last edited by delirium; 12-06-2016 at 14:01.

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  3. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by hopeful1986 View Post
    The issue is a non-black person telling a black person how they should feel about their own experiences and refusing to look past their own nose.
    It's about someone telling another person how they can or can't wear their hair. If someone is upset about my hair style I really couldn't give a crap.

  4. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by babyno1onboard View Post
    It's about someone telling another person how they can or can't wear their hair. If someone is upset about my hair style I really couldn't give a crap.
    No one is telling anyone how they can or cant wear their hair. People are saying "this is problematic and here is why". No one can force you to do or not do your hair in a certain style.

  5. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by hopeful1986 View Post
    The issue is a non-black person telling a black person how they should feel about their own experiences and refusing to look past their own nose.
    It isn't about that though. It's about a black person telling a white person they can't get corn rows bc that's CA.

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  7. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by hopeful1986 View Post
    No one is telling anyone how they can or cant wear their hair. People are saying "this is problematic and here is why". No one can force you to do or not do your hair in a certain style.
    Well they really are. I'm not saying either way, honestly I'm not sure how I feel about it. Thus starting this thread. But a black woman verbally and physically attacking a fellow uni student telling him he shouldn't be wearing dreads bc that's stealing from African culture *is* telling him how he can wear his hair.

  8. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    Well they really are. I'm not saying either way, honestly I'm not sure how I feel about it. Thus starting this thread. But a black woman verbally and physically attacking a fellow uni student telling him he shouldn't be wearing dreads bc that's stealing from African culture *is* telling him how he can wear his hair.
    I think we also need to remember that is was an individual person doing the attacking, she might have just been super angry that day and wanting to pick a fight, this was all she could come up with! It would be interesting to understand if her view is widely shared.

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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    I believe CA is not ok if it's used to mock or satirise other cultures. For example turning up to a fancy dress party with Black Face singing Mammy. That's clearly racist and narrow minded. Or when someone knowingly cashes in on a cultural aspect while claiming to be that culture when they are not. For example someone who sells Indigenous dot art as just that, when in fact they are not Indigenous.

    My issue is whether any culture really owns a practice, a hair style or an art form? Egyptians apparently had dread locks, does that mean modern day African Americans are stealing dreadlocks? Interestingly, American Indigenous art is quite similar to our Aboriginals. The notion of Day of the Dead has lots of connections with Halloween, a pagan Irish day which has then become the culture of the Western world. So who actually owns the notion of celebrating the dead? Are African American women culturally appropriating western culture by straightening their hair?

    Furthermore, in the case the dread locked white teen, are we actually dissuading cultural diversity and acceptance by refusing to allow others to wear/eat/draw in our style? Or do minorities see it as 'diluting' their culture? Like others, I'm not from a minority group so am I entitled to even say?
    Egypt is in Africa.

    As for Day of the Dead, I don't know the history behind it so I can't offer any knowledge on that. Same with indigenous art. Maybe those indigenous groups came from a similar or same place and that is why their art has similarities. I mean we are talking about a culture maybe tens of thousands of years old. Maybe even more?

    Western white culture cant really be appropriated because white people are not a marginalised group.

    Marginalised groups see appropriation as diluting, yes. They see it as a group taking meaning from part of their culture. They see it as turning their culture into a commodity while the world continues to treat them like rubbish. It's about taking parts of a culture and twisting it to suit your own intentions.

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  11. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    Well they really are. I'm not saying either way, honestly I'm not sure how I feel about it. Thus starting this thread. But a black woman verbally and physically attacking a fellow uni student telling him he shouldn't be wearing dreads bc that's stealing from African culture *is* telling him how he can wear his hair.
    Ok i stand corrected. I'm not condoning physical violence but she does have a right to be upset about it. Especially when so many people probably tell her her feelings dont matter...and they would because i see it happen all the time on social media.

  12. #19
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    I don't really have time to get into this today but I too was someone who didn't understand the hair argument until I took the time to really read into it.

    It's actually quite complex in the US and as Australians we will always struggle to undetstand why this matters as it doesn't really impact on us culturally.

    But in a nutshell for black people who are denigrated and humiliated and refused job opportunities because they don't wear their hair an acceptable way it does offend them when they see white people wearing those hairstyles and not suffering the same outcome they do.

    I actually find it offensive for white people to say another race cannot be offended by certain things when they have not lived that person's life or heritage. As white people we come from incredibly privileged worlds.

  13. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by hopeful1986 View Post
    Egypt is in Africa.
    Yes, geographically it is. But it was and still is a different culture.

    So if I have dot art on my wall (I love Indigenous art), or an African mask, do you see that as CA? Genuine question btw


 

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