+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 7 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 63
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    22,838
    Thanks
    6,199
    Thanked
    16,883
    Reviews
    10
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 postsDiamond Star - 20,000 posts
    Awards:
    Bubhub Blogger - Thanks100 Posts in a week

    Default Cultural appropriation

    There was a case in the US a few months ago of a Caucasian guy with dreadlocks who was abused and assaulted by an African American women bc she felt his dreadlocks were cultural appropriation - where a dominant culture 'steals' cultural characteristics/fashion/language/art. He argued that in fact dread locks were worn by many cultures, including Anglo ones like the Vikings. He also felt that modern day dreadlocks were actually a Rastafarian characteristic not African.

    Around the same time I read about a small business that made baby wraps who copped criticism for using material which had Sugar Skulls on it. Given these are a concept from Mexican (Mayan?) culture many considered it cultural appropriation and wanted the business to donate all money to this culture for stealing the design.

    What's your thoughts on cultural appropriation? Valid, ridiculous or somewhere in between depending on context of use?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    2,368
    Thanks
    498
    Thanked
    1,479
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Ooh I'd been wanting to start a discussion on this for ages, it comes up heaps in the babywearing world but discussion tends to devolve into argument which gets shut down by admins.
    I've seen some people suggest that natural birth and babywearing themselves are CA which I think is silly, but performing specific rituals or using specific designs could be. I've owned a bunch of wraps with Japanese and Chinese designs that would technically be CA, I thought they were just beautiful designs. I wouldn't care if a Japanese or Chinese person wore things with Celtic designs on (which would be my heritage), but Irish/Scottish people haven't really been oppressed and conquered by Asians in a similar way so it's not really a fair comparison.
    There's still so much subtle institutionalised racism in our society (as well as the overt racism too of course!) which people often want to deny, and therefore deny that CA is a problem. I'm guilty of this too as part of me wants to say that it's not a big deal, but it's easy for me to say that when I'm not part of the minority culture being appropriated.
    Obviously a lot worse when people are making money from it without acknowledging the source too.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    11,077
    Thanks
    7,240
    Thanked
    5,853
    Reviews
    11
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 29/5/15Busiest Member of the WeekBusiest Member of the Week100 Posts in a week
    I own some wraps that have CA.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    3,521
    Thanks
    1,318
    Thanked
    1,574
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Definitely context of use.

    I come across this ALL the time where Non-Maori get Maori tattoos (ta moko). We believe that only Maori can have ta moko BUT, Non-Maori can have what we call kirituhi. Many (if not most) Maori are still offended by others having kirituhi but personally I don't care as long as the process is respected and the wearer knows what their piece means, wears it with pride and didn't just download an image from the internet. I know I'm a minority but I love seeing others embrace the language and culture of ethnic groups other than their own.

    I also don't see a problem with people dressing up as Native Americans, or in Day of the dead atire etc. for fancy dress parties as long as they are respectful.

    Eta-some large international companies have used Maori haka in their advertising. I don't agree with that because it's exploitation.
    Last edited by Ngaiz; 12-06-2016 at 13:24.

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to Ngaiz For This Useful Post:

    Sonja  (12-06-2016)

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    2,040
    Thanks
    2,294
    Thanked
    1,387
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    I think the examples in the OP are ridiculous, particularly the dreadlocks. There probably are examples though where CA is not appropriate, more likely when the style/design is not used respectively.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    9,867
    Thanks
    3,034
    Thanked
    5,843
    Reviews
    2
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Awards:
    100 Posts in a week
    I don't feel like I can have a truly valid opinion as I'm a non-exotic whitey who doesn't have a true culture.

    I sometimes see reactions as overboard (the dreadlocks views), then other times I actually get a little miffed myself on behalf of other cultures (the urban turban is one example of this).

    I do think with the rise of social media there are a lot more offended folks these days though. Seems there are people just waiting for an excuse to be outraged, and when they view something that could be mildly viewed as CA, they run with it really hard and take it well over the top.

    I think this kind of rage should be reserved for blatant CA, not flaming a young white woman online for sporting corn rows (for example).

  8. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Mod-Degrassi For This Useful Post:

    J37  (12-06-2016),Ngaiz  (12-06-2016)

  9. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    572
    Thanks
    164
    Thanked
    582
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Regarding the dreads specifically, many African people have natural dreads...as in...it's not a hairstyle they created by knotting the hell out of their hair...it's just how it grows. And generally speaking, black people have been taught their hair is ugly...hence why many straighten, perm, etc. But then non-black folk decided dreads were cool and went through the effort of creating them for their own hair even though for most non-black people dreadlocks aren't really appropiate for the type of hair, causing mould growth and inability to efficiently wash it.

    So vikings and other non-black cultures may have been doing dreads for yonks, but the point is that dreads on many black people is how their hair grows from their scalp. And they have been taught its unattractive. But suddenly white hippie chick does it its kewl.

  10. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    572
    Thanks
    164
    Thanked
    582
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Mod-Degrassi View Post
    I don't feel like I can have a truly valid opinion as I'm a non-exotic whitey who doesn't have a true culture.

    I sometimes see reactions as overboard (the dreadlocks views), then other times I actually get a little miffed myself on behalf of other cultures (the urban turban is one example of this).

    I do think with the rise of social media there are a lot more offended folks these days though. Seems there are people just waiting for an excuse to be outraged, and when they view something that could be mildly viewed as CA, they run with it really hard and take it well over the top.

    I think this kind of rage should be reserved for blatant CA, not flaming a young white woman online for sporting corn rows (for example).
    If it's black people being upset because white culture thinks cornrows on a black person is "ghetto" but then praise a white girl for it its a problem. It's not that she has cornrows, its the double standard in a society that is still blatantly racist.

  11. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    2,040
    Thanks
    2,294
    Thanked
    1,387
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by hopeful1986 View Post
    If it's black people being upset because white culture thinks cornrows on a black person is "ghetto" but then praise a white girl for it its a problem. It's not that she has cornrows, its the double standard in a society that is still blatantly racist.
    To me this seems a little ridiculous. If you want a particular hair style, get it. If you don't like, don't get it.

    The individuals mocking either the black or white person (or friggin purple person) for their hairstyle are the issue.

  12. The Following User Says Thank You to babyno1onboard For This Useful Post:

    ~Marigold~  (12-06-2016)

  13. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    572
    Thanks
    164
    Thanked
    582
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by babyno1onboard View Post
    To me this seems a little ridiculous. If you want a particular hair style, get it. If you don't like, don't get it.

    The individuals mocking either the black or white person (or friggin purple person) for their hairstyle are the issue.
    The issue is a non-black person telling a black person how they should feel about their own experiences and refusing to look past their own nose.

  14. The Following User Says Thank You to hopeful1986 For This Useful Post:

    spotsmum  (12-06-2016)


 

Similar Threads

  1. Is Circumcising Baby Boys Divided Along Cultural Lines?
    By Nkozi in forum Pro-Circumcision
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 01-06-2016, 20:20
  2. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 01-03-2016, 21:04

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Mother and Baby Shop
Save $$$ during our Christmas Sale Mother and Baby Shop
Great prices on Schoenhut kids pianos, toys, baby clothing as well as big brands like Pigeon, NUK, Cherub Baby and many more. Sale starts on 1 November 2016 and ends on the 27 December 2016. Hurry! Place your order today!
sales & new stuffsee all
The Health Hub
Give a new mum a fitness boost for Christmas & New Year. Studio-based, small group training sessions - cardio, strength, core, Pilates & boxing. Choice of 16 hrs per week, flexible-arrival feature - bubs & kids welcome! Gift vouchers available.
featured supporter
Little Kickers NSW
Little Kickers was launched in 2002 in the UK and arrived Down Under in 2009. Our motto is “Play not Push” and we provide a positive fun-filled soccer program for children aged 18 months -7 years in a vibrant, group play environment.
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!