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  1. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    A lot of schools have taken part in the early action for success initiative put forward by the NSW state government to reduce the need for such intensive programs like reading recovery have implemented a program called L3. It's not yet mandated across the state but it is highly recommended by the Dept. The program is copyrighted so it's not easy to find information about it. I'm currently doing my training for year 1/2. L3 is for K-2.

    In a nutshell, teachers teach children to read whilst focussing on meaning rather than code. After all, if children are simply barking at print with no comprehension then they will not find reading enjoyable at all. L3 involves the teacher working with small groups of 2 or 3 children in the "engine room" whilst the rest of the class choose their own literacy based activity. Some teachers do rotations, other teachers let the children choose their own activities but have a couple of activities that students must do. It means the children are directing their own learning which means more children are engaged.

    A typical morning would be the teacher reading with each group (3 times a week at least) for about 10 mins. Whilst the teacher is doing reading groups, children will do go around doing their given activities that range from spelling, independent writing, familiar reading book, maths activity, etc.
    I teach Year 1 in NSW and I'm fully L3 trained. I'm also a trained Reading Recovery teacher and I love how L3 uses elements of the RR program. Our reading results for K/1 have gone through the roof since starting L3. Fantastic program 👍

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    BigRedV  (29-05-2016)

  3. #82
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    www.taughtbyfinland.com

    Some interesting food for thought on this site 👍

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    cheeeeesecake  (29-05-2016)

  5. #83
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    Default To parents in Vic (or schools with prep starting age 5/6)

    Quote Originally Posted by Chippa View Post
    I teach Year 1 in NSW and I'm fully L3 trained. I'm also a trained Reading Recovery teacher and I love how L3 uses elements of the RR program. Our reading results for K/1 have gone through the roof since starting L3. Fantastic program 👍
    So have ours. We've been one of the most successful schools in recent years. Adrian Picolli has had many meetings with our principal and instructional leader. I think they are going to continue early action for success next year in some capacity, although I think they will axe reading recovery.

    I am only teaching support at the moment but have been given my own writing group and I have 3 reading groups in the first hour. We have kindy kids already on level 8.

    My children's school does L3 as well and my daughter in year 2 is already passed level 25. My son in kindy is on level 4 already (probably higher but I only think that because I've been practising red level texts with him for my observation, lol) and can write a sentence independently.
    Last edited by BigRedV; 29-05-2016 at 06:02.

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    Chippa  (29-05-2016)

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    The Finnish system is great and so successful, but there are differences that some parents over here might not be a fan of.

    Parental leave entitlements are generous but the vast majority of parents work. Long term stay at home parents are not at all common over there. It's a pretty socialist country - people work and pay significant taxes in order to get the awesome "free" services they get. That is only possible because of the people working and paying the tax.

    Their formal schooling starts at 7 but almost every child uses daycare and preschool before then. They have to because their parents work, and why wouldn't they because it's free and high quality!

    A marvellous system, but I don't think the reality of it would suit a lot of parents over here who choose to stay home long term.

    Before anyone asks me for evidence I'm basing it on what my Finnish friends tell me and Google links. But mainly my Finnish friends who have been kids there and now have kids themselves there.

    https://eyeonearlyeducation.com/2014/03/19/finlands-approach-to-child-care-and-preschool-programs/

    The above link is a good one. Also touches on how daycare is important in terms of getting people back to work (to pay the taxes that pay for the daycare).
    Last edited by kw123; 29-05-2016 at 07:54.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kw123 View Post
    The Finnish system is great and so successful, but there are differences that some parents over here might not be a fan of.

    Parental leave entitlements are generous but the vast majority of parents work. Long term stay at home parents are not at all common over there. It's a pretty socialist country - people work and pay significant taxes in order to get the awesome "free" services they get. That is only possible because of the people working and paying the tax.

    Their formal schooling starts at 7 but almost every child uses daycare and preschool before then. They have to because their parents work, and why wouldn't they because it's free and high quality!

    A marvellous system, but I don't think the reality of it would suit a lot of parents over here who choose to stay home long term.

    Before anyone asks me for evidence I'm basing it on what my Finnish friends tell me and Google links. But mainly my Finnish friends who have been kids there and now have kids themselves there.
    Yes, it is a completely different lifestyle to here. Pretty much all parents return to work by 12 months, but have full pay for that 12 months at home. Entitlements all but cut out at 12 months, they are EXPECTED to return to work by then. 'Free' health care, education & child care, but everyone works and pays high tax to support it. But that doesn't change the fact that a later school age benefits children. My kids stay at home with me until they are 4 & start preschool. By 'home' I mean playgroup, library, playgrounds, etc most days, but I don't have them in a group education setting without me there until age 4. But being an early childhood educator, I am highly confident that I am able to provide my kids with the early education and experiences they need. I'm just glad school isn't compulsory here in SA until age 6.

    ETA - some great info on that link, @Chippa. I love the shorter days & the recognition that kids still need to play. It isn't a 'want' or slacking off, free & unstructured play is a NEED for young children & it is so valuable.
    Last edited by cheeeeesecake; 29-05-2016 at 08:06.

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  10. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    So have ours. We've been one of the most successful schools in recent years. Adrian Picolli has had many meetings with our principal and instructional leader. I think they are going to continue early action for success next year in some capacity, although I think they will axe reading recovery.

    I am only teaching support at the moment but have been given my own writing group and I have 3 reading groups in the first hour. We have kindy kids already on level 8.

    My children's school does L3 as well and my daughter in year 2 is already passed level 25. My son in kindy is on level 4 already (probably higher but I only think that because I've been practising red level texts with him for my observation, lol) and can write a sentence independently.
    That's great about your school's success! Also your own children are clearly benefitting from L3 instruction. It will be disappointing if they can Reading Recovery as it picks up those who haven't achieved as highly in the normal L3 setting. A child in my class started on Level 2 at the start of this year and now she is up to a 12 and its because of the combination of ongoing L3 and RR.

    Out of interest @BigRedV does your school continue L3 into Year 2? We only do it in K/1 then we switch to the Reading To Learn (scaffolding) program which I'm not overly sold on.

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    Yes, we do but all our stage 1 classes are composite, which I don't really like.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chippa View Post
    That's great about your school's success! Also your own children are clearly benefitting from L3 instruction. It will be disappointing if they can Reading Recovery as it picks up those who haven't achieved as highly in the normal L3 setting.
    I havent used L3, but I find if there is a good, strong literacy program in the prep & grade 1 classroom, reading recovery is only neccesary for a couple of children who really struggle.

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    Default To parents in Vic (or schools with prep starting age 5/6)

    Quote Originally Posted by Chippa View Post
    That's great about your school's success! Also your own children are clearly benefitting from L3 instruction. It will be disappointing if they can Reading Recovery as it picks up those who haven't achieved as highly in the normal L3 setting. A child in my class started on Level 2 at the start of this year and now she is up to a 12 and its because of the combination of ongoing L3 and RR.

    Out of interest @BigRedV does your school continue L3 into Year 2? We only do it in K/1 then we switch to the Reading To Learn (scaffolding) program which I'm not overly sold on.
    Also, when I say they will axe reading recovery, I don't mean our school but the state government. We would still fund it. The minister asked our principal if we could still fund it if the state government stopped funding it and we said yes because it's only 0.42 allocation.

    ETA - with L3, we have found it really hard to choose kids for reading recovery as nearly all exceed benchmark and those who don't are attendance issues.
    Last edited by BigRedV; 29-05-2016 at 12:59.

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    My son was born May 13. I'm quite glad actually. We are in Vic and he's in kinder this year and is 5. He will be 5/6 starting prep. I loved having him home and extra year.


 

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