+ Reply to Thread
Page 8 of 10 FirstFirst ... 678910 LastLast
Results 71 to 80 of 93
  1. #71
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    1,013
    Thanks
    1,211
    Thanked
    491
    Reviews
    6
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Stretched View Post
    Sonya, (unfortunately, in my opinion) prep classes in vic look very different to pre-primary classes in WA. WA there is an Education Assistant in the class all day. This does not happen at all in Vic. If an assistant is there it is because a child has funding (eg. In WA you would then have 2 assistants). That extra person in the room can deal with toilet accidents, opening lunchboxes etc. Plus it means as a teacher it is much easier to run a play based program as you have someone to help set up and pack up all the activity stations.

    Also, every school I have been to in WA has toilets either in or directly adjoining the PP classes so you could supervise toileting while still teaching.

    Finally, having 4yo/15hrs Kindy in school prepares the kids so well for full time school. The transition is so smooth.

    If I was still in WA, DS would start full time school the year he turned 5 in June, so at 4y 7m and I would have no concerns. I would not feel the same about him starting in that year in vic (he will start a year later due to cutoff here).
    Thanks for the run down on WA - my eldest is in kindy at the moment but he is one of the eldest (he's turning 5 this year) and is doing great but my DD is a May baby so will be 3 turning 4 when she is in kindy - it seems so young! But with what you've covered it seems the rooms/ teachers etc cater for this.

  2. #72
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    At the beach
    Posts
    10,495
    Thanks
    1,430
    Thanked
    9,003
    Reviews
    3
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 17/10/14100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by Stretched View Post
    Sonya, (unfortunately, in my opinion) prep classes in vic look very different to pre-primary classes in WA. WA there is an Education Assistant in the class all day. This does not happen at all in Vic. If an assistant is there it is because a child has funding (eg. In WA you would then have 2 assistants). That extra person in the room can deal with toilet accidents, opening lunchboxes etc. Plus it means as a teacher it is much easier to run a play based program as you have someone to help set up and pack up all the activity stations.

    Also, every school I have been to in WA has toilets either in or directly adjoining the PP classes so you could supervise toileting while still teaching.

    Finally, having 4yo/15hrs Kindy in school prepares the kids so well for full time school. The transition is so smooth.

    If I was still in WA, DS would start full time school the year he turned 5 in June, so at 4y 7m and I would have no concerns. I would not feel the same about him starting in that year in vic (he will start a year later due to cutoff here).
    Yeah I've come to realise prep in WA is a different beast to the rest of the country.

    But then I'm confused again by BigRedV's comment about how few start late. Are there loads of 4 year olds expected to achieve the tasks cheeeeesecake outlined in her post?

  3. #73
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    4,109
    Thanks
    1,604
    Thanked
    2,085
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Sonja View Post
    Yeah I've come to realise prep in WA is a different beast to the rest of the country.

    But then I'm confused again by BigRedV's comment about how few start late. Are there loads of 4 year olds expected to achieve the tasks cheeeeesecake outlined in her post?
    I'd have to consult the curriculum as I haven't taught/assessed at that year level in Vic.

    Anecdotally though, Vic schools (and I include parents in this) seem to have a zealous obsession with sight words in the early years. It shocked me as DD had learned using a more phonics heavy system. She transitioned easily to Vic and, while she had no idea what colour word level she was on, she could already read most of the words and moved straight on to spelling them (grade 1).

  4. #74
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    4,109
    Thanks
    1,604
    Thanked
    2,085
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Also, no 4 year olds would be expected to do those things (since it is end of year expectations) and it is only Feb, Mar and Apr babies who can start at 2 (and 28-31 Jan birthdays).

  5. #75
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    my house
    Posts
    17,698
    Thanks
    1,391
    Thanked
    7,288
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Sonja View Post
    Now I'm lost again. Do you mean the majority still start the year their child turns 5?
    Yes. Vast majority of parents in NSW still start their children the year they turn 5 provided they turn 5 before the 1st August.

  6. #76
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    my house
    Posts
    17,698
    Thanks
    1,391
    Thanked
    7,288
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Stretched View Post
    I'd have to consult the curriculum as I haven't taught/assessed at that year level in Vic.

    Anecdotally though, Vic schools (and I include parents in this) seem to have a zealous obsession with sight words in the early years. It shocked me as DD had learned using a more phonics heavy system. She transitioned easily to Vic and, while she had no idea what colour word level she was on, she could already read most of the words and moved straight on to spelling them (grade 1).
    A lot of schools in NSW don't actually teach phonics separately. But NSW (well public schools in NSW) is quite different in its approach to teaching reading and writing.

  7. #77
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    10,297
    Thanks
    3,120
    Thanked
    6,306
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    @BigRedV - How do they teach reading and writing in public schools?

  8. #78
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    my house
    Posts
    17,698
    Thanks
    1,391
    Thanked
    7,288
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 posts

    Default To parents in Vic (or schools with prep starting age 5/6)

    Quote Originally Posted by Elijahs Mum View Post
    @BigRedV - How do they teach reading and writing in public schools?
    A lot of schools have taken part in the early action for success initiative put forward by the NSW state government to reduce the need for such intensive programs like reading recovery have implemented a program called L3. It's not yet mandated across the state but it is highly recommended by the Dept. The program is copyrighted so it's not easy to find information about it. I'm currently doing my training for year 1/2. L3 is for K-2.

    In a nutshell, teachers teach children to read whilst focussing on meaning rather than code. After all, if children are simply barking at print with no comprehension then they will not find reading enjoyable at all. L3 involves the teacher working with small groups of 2 or 3 children in the "engine room" whilst the rest of the class choose their own literacy based activity. Some teachers do rotations, other teachers let the children choose their own activities but have a couple of activities that students must do. It means the children are directing their own learning which means more children are engaged.

    A typical morning would be the teacher reading with each group (3 times a week at least) for about 10 mins. Whilst the teacher is doing reading groups, children will do go around doing their given activities that range from spelling, independent writing, familiar reading book, maths activity, etc.
    Last edited by BigRedV; 28-05-2016 at 20:38.

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to BigRedV For This Useful Post:

    Elijahs Mum  (28-05-2016)

  10. #79
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    At the beach
    Posts
    10,495
    Thanks
    1,430
    Thanked
    9,003
    Reviews
    3
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 17/10/14100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by cheeeeesecake View Post
    I am a prep teacher, so I feel I am pretty qualified to comment on readiness for school. I have never felt challenged as a teacher by teaching 6 year olds who are 'too ready'. It is EXTREMELY challenging teaching 4 year olds who are not yet ready. The curriculum has to be brought was back down to a preschool level, & the first year of school becomes an extra year of kindergarten, instead of the first year of school. In my school, by the end of term 1, kids are expected to be able to read and write all single sounds, some multiple sounds, read 30-40 sight words, copy simple sentences & begin to write small sentences independently. Engage in a 30-40 minute assembly by sitting quietly and still and listening for that amount of time. Engage in structured and unstructured learning activities. Be able to complete a 3-4 step instructiom on their own (eg, sit at your desk, create an ABC pattern with the blocks,raise your hand when you are finished so I can check it, get your book out, draw the pattern neatly... etc) Many 4 year olds are just not ready to complete the requirements for school. Of course I can bring everything back down to their level, and I do so because they are not able to cope with a regular classroom situation - but 'prep' then becomes 'extra kinder' & it's a huge PITA. Luckily in SA,school is compulsory the year they turn 6.
    @Stretched her comments were in the context of what was expected by the end of term 1. I know this is just one school but it's enlightening as there's no way shape or form my son's school is teaching to that.

  11. #80
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    4,109
    Thanks
    1,604
    Thanked
    2,085
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Sonja View Post
    @Stretched her comments were in the context of what was expected by the end of term 1. I know this is just one school but it's enlightening as there's no way shape or form my son's school is teaching to that.
    Ah sorry, I missed that! Yeah that's nuts for a child who started full time school 10 weeks ago but a 6yo will definitely cope with that pressure better than a 4yo.


 

Similar Threads

  1. Child's behavior regressed after starting prep
    By Heyside in forum Discipline & behaviour
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 18-07-2016, 12:30
  2. Parents with kids starting school at less than 5yo
    By Jontu in forum General Parenting Tips, Advice & Chat
    Replies: 316
    Last Post: 29-01-2016, 10:12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Bamboo Lulu
Super soft, fun prints & basics for baby, made from bamboo & organic cotton plus non-toxic wooden toys. • Hypoallergenic - perfect for eczema relief • Everything needed to shop for a baby shower • 10% off + FREE gift with purchase. Use code BUBHUB
sales & new stuffsee all
True Fairies
True Fairies is the first interactive website where children can engage and speak with a real fairy through the unique webcam fairy portal. Each session is tailored to the child, and is filled with enchantment and magic.
Visit website to find out more!
featured supporter
Cryosite Family Cord Blood & Tissue Bank
Cryosite has been providing Cord Blood Banking services for over 12 years, and is the trusted choice of Australian families. To discuss the benefits of banking your baby's cord blood & tissue stem cells call us on 1800 220 410.
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!