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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by kw123 View Post
    This article is very relevant.

    http://theconversation.com/why-are-m...s-school-59375

    This trend for so many parents to delay sending their kids to school has wider implications for children, teachers, schools and the community. In my view, kids starting Prep close to 6 should be the absolute exception not the norm. People need to think bigger picture and not just about their individual precious darlings (this is my general view, not a response to any comments here.)
    I disagree with you entirely. Why is a 4.5-6yr gap suddenly such an issue but 4.5-5.5yr gap is perfectly acceptable? How do teachers manage with composite classes with the ages spread over 2 years?

    It IS an individual decision. Why would I send my son to school at 4.5 so he can struggle for the 'greater good'?

    Perhaps if teachers weren't running 45min reading groups expecting a 4.5yr old to participate fully in the group for the entire time then parents (like me) would think differently

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  3. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by just her chameleon View Post
    I disagree with you entirely. Why is a 4.5-6yr gap suddenly such an issue but 4.5-5.5yr gap is perfectly acceptable? How do teachers manage with composite classes with the ages spread over 2 years?

    It IS an individual decision. Why would I send my son to school at 4.5 so he can struggle for the 'greater good'?

    Perhaps if teachers weren't running 45min reading groups expecting a 4.5yr old to participate fully in the group for the entire time then parents (like me) would think differently
    I agree with this. DS1 turns 5 in July which made him eligible to start prep this year (qld) at 4.5 yrs old. No way would I have sent him - maturity wise he was not ready, and still has a day sleep which he needs!

    The principal of our (private) school actually encourages for children born after April to start the following year, unless they have a compelling reason and must have an interview with the principal and teachers to assess their readiness.

    It's got nothing to do with preciousness, and everything to do with developmental readiness, each child is different and prep is so full on many 4 yr olds wouldn't cope.

    He is so happy at kindy and doing really well, intellectually he is ready for prep but i still think he struggles with concentration/listening in a group situation. Another 7 months will hopefully improve this!

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  5. #33
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    Default To parents in Vic (or schools with prep starting age 5/6)

    We are in VIC and have an April child. We held her back so she just turned 6 in Prep. She has ASD, but the decision to start school at 5 instead of 4 was made well before her diagnosis. Personally, I would likely hold any of my children back so they weren't starting school at 4. I think that there are less 'risks' (to social and emotional wellbeing, academic skills and just general functioning) to sending later than sending at 4. It would be an easy decision for me I think. Especially if kinder teachers were saying they were 'borderline' ready. DS is November so the decision is out of our hands next time around!

    ETA it definitely seems common in VIC to 'hold back' when possible. From my mothers group (all April babies), I think about 5/6 sent at 5 turning 6.
    Last edited by sajimum; 25-05-2016 at 11:35.

  6. #34
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    That's ok - you can disagree with me

    It's perhaps a bit chicken and egg now. Teachers hold activities that might not be engaging for a 4.5 yr old... But perhaps they need to do that because there are 6 year olds in the class?

    There needs to be more consistency, and the education department needs to be the one who does it. Parents won't. Of course there will always be exceptions where it makes sense for a child to start early or late, and there must be processes to allow that. But it should be the exception.

    I think the article in question raises some relevant concerns, so hopefully people read it before commenting on my post. And doing things for society rather than just for the individual is actually incredibly important. Vaccination is a great example. (And no of course I'm not directly comparing non-vaxxers to those who hold their kids back a year. It's just an analogy).

  7. #35
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    [QUOTE=kw123;8488451]That's ok - you can disagree with me

    It's perhaps a bit chicken and egg now. Teachers hold activities that might not be engaging for a 4.5 yr old... But perhaps they need to do that because there are 6 year olds in the class?

    There needs to be more consistency, and the education department needs to be the one who does it. Parents won't. Of course there will always be exceptions where it makes sense for a child to start early or late, and there must be processes to allow that. But it should be the exception.

    I think the article in question raises some relevant concerns, so hopefully people read it before commenting on my post. And doing things for society rather than just for the individual is actually incredibly important. Vaccination is a great example. (And no of course I'm not directly comparing non-vaxxers to those who hold their kids back a year. It's just an analogy).[/QUOTE

    I know what you mean about the consistency, it seems like so many people delay starting their kids, and then you start getting huge age differences and those who feel their kids are ready have to consider that there will be lots of kids a year older than theirs in the class. If schools are noticing that many kids aren't ready within the set age range for starting perhaps there needs to be an overhaul of the system. We were lucky that this isn't a problem at our school as 95% of the kids are in the 'correct' grade for their age, DD was 4 when she started Prep (Qld) with no worries.

  8. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by kw123 View Post
    That's ok - you can disagree with me

    It's perhaps a bit chicken and egg now. Teachers hold activities that might not be engaging for a 4.5 yr old... But perhaps they need to do that because there are 6 year olds in the class?

    There needs to be more consistency, and the education department needs to be the one who does it. Parents won't. Of course there will always be exceptions where it makes sense for a child to start early or late, and there must be processes to allow that. But it should be the exception.

    I think the article in question raises some relevant concerns, so hopefully people read it before commenting on my post. And doing things for society rather than just for the individual is actually incredibly important. Vaccination is a great example. (And no of course I'm not directly comparing non-vaxxers to those who hold their kids back a year. It's just an analogy).
    I read the article and agree with your point that the education department needs to make the changes, not parents. I disagree though that kids turning 6 should be the exception. I think kids who are 4 entering full time school should be the exception and that waiting/delaying school entry is beneficial for most kids.

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  10. #37
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    I read the article, I just don't agree with it. And vaccinating also has huge advantages for the individual as well, whereas sending a 4.5yr old child to school who just isn't ready is not helping anyone. So I don't really get that analogy.

    I really doubt teachers are lesson planning based on having a 6yr old in their classroom.

  11. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by kw123 View Post
    That's ok - you can disagree with me

    It's perhaps a bit chicken and egg now. Teachers hold activities that might not be engaging for a 4.5 yr old... But perhaps they need to do that because there are 6 year olds in the class?

    There needs to be more consistency, and the education department needs to be the one who does it. Parents won't. Of course there will always be exceptions where it makes sense for a child to start early or late, and there must be processes to allow that. But it should be the exception.

    I think the article in question raises some relevant concerns, so hopefully people read it before commenting on my post. And doing things for society rather than just for the individual is actually incredibly important. Vaccination is a great example. (And no of course I'm not directly comparing non-vaxxers to those who hold their kids back a year. It's just an analogy).
    There is no "early" or "late" start. Parents have the choice to start their child at 4 or 5. I'm glad I live in NSW where I have the choice otherwise my son would've started school as a 4 year old turning 5 over half way through July.

    Some 4 year olds are smarter than 6 year olds but that doesn't mean they are ready for school or would be ready for high school at 11.

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  13. #39
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    A few things i was asked to consider was not just how well they can do xyz.... but how can they regulate their emotions?
    How are their self help and self care? (Wiping own bottom, taking care and keeping track of their belongings, dressing and undressing
    Can they just sit and listen in a large group and take stuff in and make sense of it?
    Can they follow multiple step instructions? (Ok when we get home you need to take your shoes off, put your bag away and hang up your jacket. Can this be done without being reminded of a step sort of thing)

    School are so very much more structured than kinder. And they can be so creative at kinder and explore things without limitations. At school the learning will most often follow a fairly strict curriculum of "by x time children should be able to xyz".
    E.g. if a cold at kinder discovers shadows they can experiment with torches and shadow puppets, lights ...which may lead them onto the sun, and solar energy or space and stars and planets. Or it could lead them down the path of rsinbows and colors and reflecting light off surfaces or using cellophane on the Windows too make colored shadows etc.
    School wouldn't have that flexibility.

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    Default To parents in Vic (or schools with prep starting age 5/6)

    Quote Originally Posted by kw123 View Post
    This article is very relevant.

    http://theconversation.com/why-are-m...s-school-59375

    This trend for so many parents to delay sending their kids to school has wider implications for children, teachers, schools and the community. In my view, kids starting Prep close to 6 should be the absolute exception not the norm. People need to think bigger picture and not just about their individual precious darlings (this is my general view, not a response to any comments here.)
    The article states that less than 3% of children in Queensland start "late" and one of the problems of this is the teachers is differentiating the curriculum to meet the needs of the age range. You could have a class of 20 children born on the same day and the teacher would still need to differentiate for all of them.

    The reason people are keeping their children home for an extra year in Queensland is because they now have the option. 4.5 is way too young to start school. I believe children should start the year they turn 6.
    Last edited by BigRedV; 26-05-2016 at 12:27.

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