+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 37
  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    3,952
    Thanks
    694
    Thanked
    2,301
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by mummymaybe View Post
    This is not true, my son was stillborn and I was given a medication called Dostinex to stop my milk coming in and the midwives also told me to avoid hot showers and any nipple stimulation.

    It worked for me and my milk didn't come but that is not always the case. Some people still get milk and I would assume the presence of a live baby would increase it.
    Sorry for your loss xox

    I was not sure if milk came 'in' if not BF. I learnt something new. Thank you.

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to twinklify For This Useful Post:

    mummymaybe  (23-05-2016)

  3. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Posts
    6,869
    Thanks
    4,776
    Thanked
    4,210
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Awards:
    100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by Chlozzalove View Post
    Ive been told a lot about BF but I can't bring myself to do it. Also, I want my partner to be close with bub too and want him to be able to feed our baby too.
    fair enough.

    I still think you should not completely discount it til bub is actually born (these hormones may just change your mind!) but it's ultimately your call.

    would you consider expressing and bottle feeding expressed milk? that way bub gets a bit of boob juice and your hubby still gets a go at feeding bub?

    I get that it's nice to involve the hubby (mine bottle feeds our ds too) but there's no substitute for the snuggles and fuzzy feelings you get from BF (I mean for you obviously, not your hubby).

  4. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    142
    Thanks
    50
    Thanked
    84
    Reviews
    0
    I was straight up about not BF from the minute I got to the hospital. No one asked why and they respected my choice. I was given medication to stop my milk from coming in and it worked great, no issues at all.

  5. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    4,114
    Thanks
    2,904
    Thanked
    3,330
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    OP are you private or public? I know it's not right but I've found the more you pay the more they respect your decision not to BF. That's just what I've found around my friends.

    I had attachment issues so even though I planned to BF I couldn't. I pumped for a month and mixed fed. If you still wanted some of your milk to go to your Bub you could pump and put it in a bottle. You may have to pump some off anyway to relieve the pain.

  6. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Posts
    371
    Thanks
    277
    Thanked
    210
    Reviews
    0
    Time and time again people told me you'd 'know' when you're in labour. I got over hearing it but I have to admit, it's totally true! I did have a few signs of labour being around the corner (losing mucus plug/bloody show & had a clear out). Once contractions started hard and fast I knew it was labour.

    I had an epidural after 20hrs of painful contractions back to back. I don't know how I lasted so long but it was the best thing for me as no other pain medications offered me any relief. I would easily have another epidural if the labour was similar to my first.

    I never thought I'd have an epidural! Went in with a natural birth mindset but walked out with a birth far from that! (I'll spare the details!)

    Do whatever gets you through and brings your Bub here safely!

  7. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    1,555
    Thanks
    438
    Thanked
    910
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts

    Default Labour questions

    Quote Originally Posted by turquoisecoast View Post
    fair enough.

    I still think you should not completely discount it til bub is actually born (these hormones may just change your mind!) but it's ultimately your call.

    would you consider expressing and bottle feeding expressed milk? that way bub gets a bit of boob juice and your hubby still gets a go at feeding bub?

    I get that it's nice to involve the hubby (mine bottle feeds our ds too) but there's no substitute for the snuggles and fuzzy feelings you get from BF (I mean for you obviously, not your hubby).
    The OP is asking how to firmly let midwives know of her wishes to bottle feed, not whether she should bottle feed or not. It sounds like she has made her mind up, and that should be respected. I understand you are trying to help and offer alternatives especially as it seems like OP is a first time mum, but there is a lot of pressure to breastfeed, and well meant advice may come across as pressure.

    With my first I felt guilted and a lot of pressure from midwives and lactation consultants to persevere with breastfeeding when it wasn't working, my health was suffering and my baby was miserable. This ultimately led to PND and so I am very wary of the pressure to breastfeed in society.

    OP there is absolutely nothing wrong with formula feeding from birth, I am 32 weeks and will be doing it. I just told my OB and midwives straight up that is what my plan is and there were no dramas. I will be bringing my own bottles and formula to the hospital, though many hospitals supply them. I was advised to bring my own so Bub gets used to the teats/formula and doesn't have to change when home. There is a medication to stop your milk coming in, you will need to ask your healthcare professional.

    Sterilising and washing is no drama. I did it once a day with my first, took all of 10 minutes to do that and then prep bottles for the next day.

    I believe you bond just as much with your Bub whether you breast or bottle feed. You are still close and sharing something very special.

    I imagine most staff will respect your decision, but if you get a pushy midwife don't be guilted. This is your baby and your decision, fed is best, whatever your feeding method. All the best.
    Last edited by Patience86; 23-05-2016 at 19:40.

  8. The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to Patience86 For This Useful Post:

    babyno1onboard  (23-05-2016),bluehawaii  (23-05-2016),Cdro  (23-05-2016),coco123  (23-05-2016),HillDweller  (23-05-2016),sarah1502  (23-05-2016),~Marigold~  (23-05-2016)

  9. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    At the beach
    Posts
    10,495
    Thanks
    1,430
    Thanked
    9,003
    Reviews
    3
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 17/10/14100 Posts in a week
    To be fair to @turquoisecoast she also struggled with breastfeeding at first and nearly threw in the towel so I read her post as trying to be supportive and encouraging for a first time mum.

  10. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Sonja For This Useful Post:

    BettyV  (23-07-2016),Happymum2  (23-05-2016),smallpotatoes  (24-05-2016),turquoisecoast  (23-05-2016)

  11. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    21,648
    Thanks
    15,093
    Thanked
    11,259
    Reviews
    14
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 postsDiamond Star - 20,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the WeekBusiest Member of the Week - week ended 5/2/14Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 31/10/14Busiest Member of the Week - week ended 24/10/14Busiest Member of the Week
    I have had 6 babies so hopefully I can help ease your mind.


    Quote Originally Posted by Chlozzalove View Post
    So I'm quite frightened about going into labour and I have a few questions which I hope you lovely people would be able to help me to answer.

    How do you know your going into labour?
    When your contraction don't go away if you lay down for 20 or mins. It might be the real thing. It doesn't matter if you go in and get sent home because it's not the real deal. That is quite normal.



    Is an epidural a good choice?
    Honestly they scare the **** out of me. It's not something I would choose for myself. They work great for others. They are just not my cup of tea.

    How do you firmly tell the midwives that you want to bottle feed and not breast feed?

    Tell them at your anti natal appointments. Write it in birth plan. If necessary just remind them after the birth.



    Is there a pill you can get to stop the breast milk?
    Yes there is. Talk to your Dr about it.


    Thankyou (:

  12. The Following User Says Thank You to LoveLivesHere For This Useful Post:

    Wise Enough  (23-05-2016)

  13. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Posts
    6,869
    Thanks
    4,776
    Thanked
    4,210
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Awards:
    100 Posts in a week

    Default Labour questions

    Quote Originally Posted by Sonja View Post
    To be fair to @turquoisecoast she also struggled with breastfeeding at first and nearly threw in the towel so I read her post as trying to be supportive and encouraging for a first time mum.
    thank you.

    was going to add this but didn't want to derail the thread. suffice to say, it nearly broke me. hands down one of, if not the, hardest thing I've done (the labour was the easy bit lol). I expressed for weeks to keep up my supply whilst trying to get my ds to learn to latch and feed properly. was not easy.

    all that said, we offer formula in the evenings so my dh can have a go and I get a break. I'm definitely not anti-formula feeding. in fact I can't stand the pressure to BF from the midwives (public hospitals I think are notoriously worse for this) and I hate the piousness that some exclusively BF mums adopt!

    I'm just trying to encourage a first time mum. or at least try to encourage a first time mum not to discount it completely.

  14. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to turquoisecoast For This Useful Post:

    babyno1onboard  (23-05-2016),bezzy  (24-05-2016),Happymum2  (23-05-2016),twinklify  (23-05-2016)

  15. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    5,747
    Thanks
    3,825
    Thanked
    3,655
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Chlozzalove View Post
    So I'm quite frightened about going into labour and I have a few questions which I hope you lovely people would be able to help me to answer. How do you know your going into labour? Is an epidural a good choice? How do you firmly tell the midwives that you want to bottle feed and not breast feed? Is there a pill you can get to stop the breast milk? Thankyou (:
    Have you done any antenatal classes at your hospital? They should be able to address some of your concerns.

    There are plenty of good responses already, but yes if it's labor you'll know it, it is different for everyone and very hard to describe IMO. For some it is slow and steady and for others fast and furious. Your waters may or may not break before contractions begin (they often don't break until in established labor). You may or may not lose your mucous plug (gooey substance) before contractions begin. But it's not considered to be real labor until you're having regular contractions a few minutes apart consistently for an hour or more. The contractions generally start out mild but get more intense as labor progresses. There are apps you can download and use to time your contractions, some even prompt you when it's time to go to hospital. Your midwives will ask you to call beforehand and be able to guide you at the time also.

    Whether or not an epidural is a good choice is a very very individual thing. You should familiarise yourself with the risks, and also know there is a chance it might not work. It is the most common pain relief option however there are risks and it restricts you to a bed which may not be an optimal position depending on your baby position and your body.

    With regard to breastfeeding if you are 100% decided on bottle feeding I would suggest writing it (and any other preferences) in a birth plan and give your hospital a copy/have additional copies for your midwife team. Some hospitals will make you sign a waiver, but they can't make you breastfeed if you don't want to.

    Labor is largely out of your control. Just remember women have been doing it for thousands of years and keep going back for more - don't read horror stories, familiarise yourself with pain relief options if pain is a concern for you. And do consider doing some kind of birth preparation course/workshop or at the very least some antenatal classes.

  16. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to sunnygirl79 For This Useful Post:

    twinklify  (23-05-2016),Wise Enough  (23-05-2016)


 

Similar Threads

  1. pre labour
    By Youngbabymama in forum Third Trimester Chat
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 08-04-2016, 18:33
  2. I need your most pressing pregnancy/labour questions!
    By annabanana1 in forum Research Help
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 03-01-2016, 17:39
  3. What were you doing when you went into labour?
    By tazz475 in forum Third Trimester Chat
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: 24-06-2015, 12:16

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Pebblebee
Parents spend hours looking for things they need NOW. The keys, the remote, darling daughter's treasured teddy. Stop wasting precious time looking & start finding with Bub Hub reviewed Pebblebee Smart Tag. Simply attach a Pebblebee and find it fast.
sales & new stuffsee all
Bub Hub Sales Listing
HAVING A SALE? Let parents know about it with a Bub Hub Sales listing. Listings are featured on our well trafficked Sales Page + selected randomly to appear on EVERY page
featured supporter
Softmats
Softmats specialises in safe, non-toxic, and durable play mats. The international Premium Dwinguler™ Play Mats and Premium Bubba Mat™ range of floor spaces are the best quality in the world.
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!