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    Quote Originally Posted by BornToBe View Post
    Raw milk is safe. There are giant campaigns going on world wide to legalize its distribution. It's already legal in several countries (and always has been). Australia is nuts over the top about pasteurization. If we could invest a little $$$ in helping farmers to keep milk safe AND raw, there would be a huge market for it. I had a cow and drank raw milk for 12 months, fed it to my two toddlers who blossomed with it. It's all about cow health, and hygiene of the handlers.
    I'm OK with raw milk straight from the cow as I grew up on it but I don't trust the stuff sold in health food stores that people consume. If I had a local farmer I would absolutely buy it.

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    Raw milk is a lot safer consumed straight from the cow than when it's stored and transported. Breastmilk is safe... But can you imagine bottling it up, having it sit on shop shelves for days, then having it at home in the fridge for days while you use a bit at a time? The microbes multiply, and that's the whole point of pasteurization... To reduce the microbe level to a point where it'll be safe to drink for a longer period.

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  4. #173
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    Quote Originally Posted by BornToBe View Post
    Raw milk is safe. There are giant campaigns going on world wide to legalize its distribution. It's already legal in several countries (and always has been). Australia is nuts over the top about pasteurization. If we could invest a little $$$ in helping farmers to keep milk safe AND raw, there would be a huge market for it. I had a cow and drank raw milk for 12 months, fed it to my two toddlers who blossomed with it. It's all about cow health, and hygiene of the handlers.
    Bolded part is true - it is about that. Its also about the fact that we live in a truly enormous country, and storage and distribution of raw milk safely is a HUGE issue.

    It cannot be done here. The distance - and therefore time - between where the milk is produced, bottled, distributed to the shops and eventually purchased are simply too great to allow for the safe sale of raw milk.

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    How can you say it cannot be done here due to distance? We couldn't have a maximum of distance between farm and distribution and go with that? Obviously only selling raw milk from farm shops and stalls etc could be a goer.

    Raw milk is sold safely and legally in New Zealand, Europe and states in America so I don't see what makes Australia an impossibility.

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    DH is an ex dairy farmer & his family drank raw milk from their own cows. However he now works in animal health and would never drink unpasteurised milk from a commercial dairy. Apparently it's minimal risk drinking unpasteurised milk on the day it's milked, when you know how it's been stored/transported, but it's a whole other story drinking unpasteurised milk that's from a 500 head herd, been stored in vats, transported large distance etc. Just too much chance for contamination.
    Also the milk powder thing is apparently because we as consumers demand a consistent product. So when it arrives at the processing plant it gets tested for fat content etc and adjusted to a standard (with milk powder) because that's what consumers demand. If this wasn't done there would be seasonal variation in the flavour of milk, which doesn't work for the mass market.
    We've never bought generic brand milk - DH would tip it down the sink if I brought it home! He'd rather go without.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BornToBe View Post
    How can you say it cannot be done here due to distance? We couldn't have a maximum of distance between farm and distribution and go with that? Obviously only selling raw milk from farm shops and stalls etc could be a goer.

    Raw milk is sold safely and legally in New Zealand, Europe and states in America so I don't see what makes Australia an impossibility.
    @rosey82 seems to have answered that for me exactly

    distance is a problem purely because of the time (and therefore storage requirements) required. If you are selling raw milk that is produced in inland Victoria in Melbourne or Sydney supermarkets, it takes time to get it from the cow to processing/bottling plant, to the wharehouse for distribution and then to the supermarket ... and raw milk simply does not store safely.

    And that doesnt even start to address the herd hygene or milking hygene issues.

    Even in NZ where raw milk can be sold (and the sale of such is under strict conditions and heavily regulated) - the govt recommends boiling it before drinking ...

    http://mpi.govt.nz/news-and-resource...ng-raw-milk-2/

    anyway - is a bit off topic but I dont want people to think that raw milk is healthier

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    Quote Originally Posted by BornToBe View Post
    How can you say it cannot be done here due to distance? We couldn't have a maximum of distance between farm and distribution and go with that? Obviously only selling raw milk from farm shops and stalls etc could be a goer.

    Raw milk is sold safely and legally in New Zealand, Europe and states in America so I don't see what makes Australia an impossibility.
    I'm sure that in NZ it can only be sold at the farm gate and there are lots of hoops that need jumping through to be able to do this. It's not stored in vats or transported.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rosey82 View Post
    DH is an ex dairy farmer & his family drank raw milk from their own cows. However he now works in animal health and would never drink unpasteurised milk from a commercial dairy. Apparently it's minimal risk drinking unpasteurised milk on the day it's milked, when you know how it's been stored/transported, but it's a whole other story drinking unpasteurised milk that's from a 500 head herd, been stored in vats, transported large distance etc. Just too much chance for contamination.
    Also the milk powder thing is apparently because we as consumers demand a consistent product. So when it arrives at the processing plant it gets tested for fat content etc and adjusted to a standard (with milk powder) because that's what consumers demand. If this wasn't done there would be seasonal variation in the flavour of milk, which doesn't work for the mass market.
    We've never bought generic brand milk - DH would tip it down the sink if I brought it home! He'd rather go without.
    I'm with your husband! I work as a vet and the stuff that can grow in milk scares me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BH-KatiesMum View Post
    anyway - is a bit off topic but I dont want people to think that raw milk is healthier
    If you can source organic, local, raw milk it is healthier than pasturised, homoginised 'milk' with additives.

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    Quote Originally Posted by monroe78 View Post
    The difference between a 2 litre bottle of home brand milk and a farmers brand, like Farmers Own for example is only $1.39. So it would only be an extra $11.12 on 8 2 litre bottles. May be less of a price difference on different brands again, or the 3 litre bottles. Not too bad if it means no milk from China and less suicides of our farmers.

    It isn't as costly as some assume
    It certainly isn't that cheap in our area. The next step from Woolies/Coles milk is Fonterra at $4 for a 2L. That's double. Despite consuming around 14L a week, we could afford the change. For someone $14 or $28 a fortnight is just too much for a family already deeply struggling.

    I actually support the move away from generic milk and supporting farmers 100%. I just want to point out that while you or I could absorb that, some families can't.

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