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  1. #1
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    Default NAPLAN preparation... how much is too much?

    So with NAPLAN just finished, it's got me thinking as my DD will be in grade 3 next year. How much preparation is actually required for NAPLAN? Personally I'd prefer she be shown a test or two, and complete it to get her a feel for the format and that's it. Is that too simplistic?

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    Nope that's exactly how it should be done. A couple of practice goes so they know what to expect and how the format works and leave it at that :-)

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    In my mind no preparation is required. It's supposed to measure performance at a point in time. Coaching is counterintuitive.

    In reality, for primary school at least, my kid's school takes it too seriously in the NAPLAN years. They waste most of term 1 coaching them up on NAPLAN style maths questions and persuasive essays. Kids are usually given last years NAPLAN test in the first couple of weeks of term 1. They are then ******ed according to maths ability. The kids who score in the second top box are given special tutoring (read extra work for mum and dad to do with them at home) because they want as many kids as possible in the top box.

    Same in maths for highschool, except the extra tutoring is before school and not during lesson time.

    Huge waste of resources.

    I had great delight in sending my SN DD on NAPLAN days because I know her score will bring the school's results down. Which is actually a good thing because it brings in extra funding for the school. BUT the school then gets to elect where they money will be spent and it sure as hell does not go directly to the kids who need it.
    Last edited by SSecret Squirrel; 14-05-2016 at 10:42.

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    I'm a primary teacher and I can only speak for my school, but we basically do what you described. We don't make a big deal of it and just get kids to do a couple of practices in the week or so before to get used to the format.
    We make sure kids understand that its just a snapshot of where they're at, not a massive deal.
    I think lots of schools make a big deal of it because they're aware of parents "school shopping" using the myschools website and judging schools purely on NAPLAN results. It can be so stressful for the poor kids!

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    Quote Originally Posted by SSecret Squirrel View Post
    In my mind no preparation is required. It's supposed to measure performance at a point in time. Coaching is counterintuitive.

    In reality, for primary school at least, my kid's school takes it too seriously in the NAPLAN years. They waste most of term 1 coaching them up on NAPLAN style maths questions and persuasive essays. Kids are usually given last years NAPLAN test in the first couple of weeks of term 1. They are then ******ed according to maths ability. The kids who score in the second top box are given special tutoring (read extra work for mum and dad to do with them at home) because they want as many kids as possible in the top box.

    Same in maths for highschool, except the extra tutoring is before school and not during lesson time.

    Huge waste of resources.

    I had great delight in sending my SN DD on NAPLAN days because I know her score will bring the school's results down. Which is actually a good thing because it brings in extra funding for the school. BUT the school then gets to elect where they money will be spent and it sure as hell does not go directly to the kids who need it.
    That level of preparation is what's wrong with the naplan. Imo. I was so pleased that our school had little to no prep. Dd1 wasn't in the least stressed or concerned. I told it was to test the teachers not the kids. I think they did some similar work in class but they never saw naplan questions. You hear awful stuff about kids being stressed out.

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    DS is only in kindy so I don't have any experience with it but this was in one of our weekly newsletters last month which I thought was good info/advice:

    If you’re the parent of a child in Years 3, 5, 7 or 9, you might be looking for some practical advice or tips on how to help your child prepare for NAPLAN in May. Our advice is to stop searching, because other than a good night’s sleep beforehand and a nutritious breakfast on the day, there is very little you can do to prepare.

    Students are not able to prepare for NAPLAN in the same way that they would for other assessments. This is due to NAPLAN assessing the level of a student at the time of the tests in the areas of:

    reading
    writing
    language conventions; and
    numeracy skills.

    we encourage parents to continually help their sons to develop literacy and numeracy skills over the course of the year. Classroom teachers are able to provide parents with suggestions, based on each individual boy’s leaning progress

    The School provides opportunities for students to become familiar with NAPLAN tests. We do not encourage parents to hire coaches or tutors for the sole purpose of preparing their son for the NAPLAN tests – this will only give a false result of how he is growing and defeats the overall purpose of the assessment for both the student and the School.

    The best way to support your son through the NAPLAN tests

    - provide a calm and encouraging environment at home;
    - avoid overly focusing on it in your conversations; and let him know that all that he can do is his best and that he should not be nervous

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    Default NAPLAN preparation... how much is too much?

    Quote Originally Posted by SSecret Squirrel View Post
    In my mind no preparation is required. It's supposed to measure performance at a point in time. Coaching is counterintuitive.

    In reality, for primary school at least, my kid's school takes it too seriously in the NAPLAN years. They waste most of term 1 coaching them up on NAPLAN style maths questions and persuasive essays. Kids are usually given last years NAPLAN test in the first couple of weeks of term 1. They are then ******ed according to maths ability. The kids who score in the second top box are given special tutoring (read extra work for mum and dad to do with them at home) because they want as many kids as possible in the top box.

    Same in maths for highschool, except the extra tutoring is before school and not during lesson time.

    Huge waste of resources.

    I had great delight in sending my SN DD on NAPLAN days because I know her score will bring the school's results down. Which is actually a good thing because it brings in extra funding for the school. BUT the school then gets to elect where they money will be spent and it sure as hell does not go directly to the kids who need it.
    Well they wasted their time teaching persuasive texts as this year it was narrative
    Last edited by BigRedV; 14-05-2016 at 11:31.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bel2466 View Post
    Nope that's exactly how it should be done. A couple of practice goes so they know what to expect and how the format works and leave it at that :-)
    I agree with this. They need to know how to answer multiple choice. The rest is unnecessary.

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  12. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by SSecret Squirrel View Post
    In my mind no preparation is required. It's supposed to measure performance at a point in time. Coaching is counterintuitive.

    In reality, for primary school at least, my kid's school takes it too seriously in the NAPLAN years. They waste most of term 1 coaching them up on NAPLAN style maths questions and persuasive essays. Kids are usually given last years NAPLAN test in the first couple of weeks of term 1. They are then ******ed according to maths ability. The kids who score in the second top box are given special tutoring (read extra work for mum and dad to do with them at home) because they want as many kids as possible in the top box.

    Same in maths for highschool, except the extra tutoring is before school and not during lesson time.

    Huge waste of resources.

    I had great delight in sending my SN DD on NAPLAN days because I know her score will bring the school's results down. Which is actually a good thing because it brings in extra funding for the school. BUT the school then gets to elect where they money will be spent and it sure as hell does not go directly to the kids who need it.
    Wow, that is full on. And a waste of time!

    I just asked my year 3 and 5, they said they did one of each area's practice test, and wrote a story. However I had always thought our school was quite competitive with NAPLAN, so perhaps they did do more prep but not actually say it was for NAPLAN.

    I went to an anxiety talk at school the other night, and the school counsellor said there are actually a lot of stressed kids atm due to NAPLAN. So I wonder where is the pressure coming from? Parents? Teachers? I have heard of parents having their kids tutored for NAPLAN.

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    We did no preparation at all, the school did I think one practice run and then the real thing. I don't think anything more than that is necessary.


 

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