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    Default Sensory Processing Disorder

    Hi all,

    I was just wondering if anyone can shed some light!

    My sister has a 17 month old beautiful girl who is perfect, happy and active!

    Over the last 3 months, she began chucking a tantrum as soon as she got home, and I mean as soon as she stepped a foot in the front door.

    At first, it was ignored or treated as a tantrum but then she started banging her head into things. She would pick up something and hit herself in the head and then it wasn't hard enough so she grabbed something else.

    We then noticed that what we used to think was cute may be a factor as well.....she wouldn't cross from one "texture" to another. For example going from concrete to grass or tiles to carpet. She will need to hesitate, examine and then sit down and crawl over it.....maybe!

    Her daycare told my sister that they believe she has a sight problem because she couldn't (wouldn't) step over things.

    Sooooo, my sister took the LO to the docs, assuming that she was going to get her eyes checked but he said that he believes she has Sensory Processing Disorder! Now off to the specialists for $200 an hour for further diagnosis or treatment.

    Does anyone have any experience in this? Has your child got it?

    I have googled all the information on it but I would like to hear from someone who has dealt with it!

    I just want a better understanding of the way it may affect her day to day.

  2. #2
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    Yep. My daughter is 19 months. It affects her eating.

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    My 4yo son has sensory processing disorder (among other things). He is what is considered sensory seeking, meaning he wants to touch other textures and basically cannot function without doing so. This is the opposite to sensory avoidance which is what it seems like you are talking about. Does she have issues with certain foods, pull away from kisses/hugs, have an inability to touch things like mud, slime etc? They are things I would be looking out for as they can all be signs of it. (We are 100% sure I am this but I can't see the point in me having myself diagnosed with it as I know what I can and can't touch) Sensory processing disorders are so varied and include all the senses, so if you want to Google, something like "sensory avoidance" should yield you much more than just sensory processing disorder in general.

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    AdornedWithCats  (01-05-2016)

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    I have 2 with spd and one that visual and auditory processing disorder.
    My children where diagnosed to they were 4.

    There are lots of things out there that can help. Her OT will become her best friend.

    Questions do you have?

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    You could help her out by desensitising her slowly and signing her up for early intervention support if your area has it.

  7. #6
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    Please please please DO NOT try and desensitise her without seeing a OT or pead first. You can cause massive more damage. It's really important to work with the professionals. If they do have issues especially with food sensitivity (both seeking and avoiding).

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    Quote Originally Posted by LoveLivesHere View Post
    Please please please DO NOT try and desensitise her without seeing a OT or pead first. You can cause massive more damage. It's really important to work with the professionals. If they do have issues especially with food sensitivity (both seeking and avoiding).
    I agree with this. I probably made my daughters eating 10x worse without even knowing it.

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    Thank you for all your comments.

    My sister is not trying anything until she is instructed to do so by the professional.

    I guess I just wanted to know the following:

    Is this a "disability"?
    Is it "curable"?
    Will it affect her learning?
    Can it cause her to be picked on?
    Will she need extra care for a longer period of time?

    Just silly things like that! I just am trying to find out how life is going to be for my Sister and Niece after the diagnosis!

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    Quote Originally Posted by beckyashleigh View Post
    Thank you for all your comments.

    My sister is not trying anything until she is instructed to do so by the professional.

    I guess I just wanted to know the following:

    Is this a "disability"?
    Is it "curable"?
    Will it affect her learning?
    Can it cause her to be picked on?
    Will she need extra care for a longer period of time?

    Just silly things like that! I just am trying to find out how life is going to be for my Sister and Niece after the diagnosis!
    I can only speak for my own situation so take it with a grain of salt.
    The disability I'm not sure of, as he has a "disability" for other reasons so it never occurred to me about the SPD itself.

    It's not curable, but some parts are manageable. My son, because he is sensory seeking, has fiddle toys to stimulate his hands. His SPD also affect him audibly, which we counteract with him wearing ear muffs a lot of the time. Things like deep pressure help him when he is overwhelmed by visual stimulus.

    We don't anticipate it will affect his learning too much, so long as his controls are in place. Such as being able to take his fiddle toys and eat muffs into class with him. He starts school next year so will be a learning curve I'm sure.

    A lot of things can be well hidden and children often pick up on completely different things to us. I have concerns he may be picked on for wearing his ear muffs but I doubt the kids will know to pick on him for "hearing sounds too loud" if that makes sense.

    Again, because of my sons other issues, that one is difficult for me to answer.

    But just some insight to myself with regard to these. I cannot touch certain textures, eat certain foods if they have touched other foods etc. I also get a claustrophobic feeling if things are too loud (concerts are no go and even when hubby turns the telly too loud). Most people wouldn't know any of this about me. I was never picked on at school for it. I was able to adapt very well so it wasn't noticeable. But as I mentioned earlier, I am not presently diagnosed with anything, though all signs point to me having it also.

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  12. #10
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    In my experience

    Quote Originally Posted by beckyashleigh View Post

    I guess I just wanted to know the following:

    Is this a "disability"?

    It depends on your definition of a disability. We she need ongoing treatment ? For a few years...
    In terms of centrelink etc No not on its own.


    Is it "curable"?

    It manageable mostly. It never goes away but we can learn how to lesson it's impact.


    Will it affect her learning?

    Yes and no. It can influence how they learn and they way other treat them. But it's not a intelligence limiting problem. Dd1 is a straight a student.


    Can it cause her to be picked on?

    Yes. But so can red hair or glasses etc...


    Will she need extra care for a longer period of time?

    She will need some adjustments made for her for a while at least.

    Just silly things like that! I just am trying to find out how life is going to be for my Sister and Niece after the diagnosis!
    Once she sees a it things will be a little much for a bit but as life goes on it just becomes second nature.

    Don't get me wrong it not a bed of rose petals but it's not a bed of thorns either


    I thought I should add. Dd1 is almost 15. Ds2 is almost 7.
    Ds1 who only has auditory and visual processing disorders is 16.
    They all have something else as well eg. Adhd or aspergers.
    Last edited by LoveLivesHere; 02-05-2016 at 18:50.


 

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