+ Reply to Thread
Page 14 of 20 FirstFirst ... 41213141516 ... LastLast
Results 131 to 140 of 200
  1. #131
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    2,727
    Thanks
    1,521
    Thanked
    1,958
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    @gingermillie
    Edited: my bad, I was quoting DP on some of the numbers. Rego is actually more like $800. Thanks for the correction.

    As for gas, insurance etc., location certainly is a major factor but it also helps to bargain hard. We've reduced our bills a LOT purely by switching or threatening to switch providers.
    Last edited by Renn; 22-04-2016 at 20:17.

  2. #132
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    2,727
    Thanks
    1,521
    Thanked
    1,958
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Full House View Post
    The assumptions in this thread are rather amusing.
    I was a sahm for years...and DH earns a good wage, but we did struggle because we do live in the 'expensive suburb.' It had nothing to do with being greedy or not being willing to make sacrifices or anything like that.
    My dh's job requires him to work close to the city...so we had a choice...to live in the expensive suburb close to dh's work (so he didn't have 14-15hr days with travel time), be surrounded by great public schools within walking distance, and everything that we love (city life).
    Or, we could live an hour away in a more rural area that is saturated with low ses families, send our children to the overfull public schools, or pay through the roof for the private school (or send our kids to a catholic school when we're atheists....no thanks), DH could spend 2-3hrs travelling each day and we'd have to drive everywhere because there's nothing close and the public transport system is awful.
    We are now a family of two working parents...because we absolutely love the lifestyle we have in our 'expensive suburb,' and have absolutely no desire to move. We'd be absolutely miserable.
    Oh, and if we sold our house to move out we'd be able to buy a house right, and we could both work meaningless part time jobs and live 'the simple life.' But we'd be absolutely miserable.
    Oh absolutely... if it's as simplistic as saying "you must be so greedy and frivolous to spend that much money" then there are a whole lot of unnecessary assumptions in that. In saying that though, it's still a matter of priorities and living within your means.

    You've chosen a more expensive lifestyle that you love, which is great. I think most people could get by fine on a hell of a lot less money if they really had to. It might mean moving to a location they don't love; having no choice in school; taking a less fulfilling job etc., but they could do it if they had no choice.

    It's fantastic that so many of us HAVE these options, and the ability to decide how we want to live our own lives. What gets me is when people - of whatever income - fail to acknowledge how incredibly privileged we as Australians are and all of the luxuries we have (whether that be the ability to earn enough to live in the suburb we want, to buy coffee when out or to spend $240 a year on takeaway).

  3. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to Renn For This Useful Post:

    babyno1onboard  (22-04-2016),BornToBe  (23-04-2016),cheeeeesecake  (22-04-2016),delirium  (22-04-2016),Freyamum  (22-04-2016),Stretched  (22-04-2016)

  4. #133
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    2,669
    Thanks
    1,004
    Thanked
    2,412
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Renn View Post
    Oh absolutely... if it's as simplistic as saying "you must be so greedy and frivolous to spend that much money" then there are a whole lot of unnecessary assumptions in that. In saying that though, it's still a matter of priorities and living within your means.

    You've chosen a more expensive lifestyle that you love, which is great. I think most people could get by fine on a hell of a lot less money if they really had to. It might mean moving to a location they don't love; having no choice in school; taking a less fulfilling job etc., but they could do it if they had no choice.

    It's fantastic that so many of us HAVE these options, and the ability to decide how we want to live our own lives. What gets me is when people - of whatever income - fail to acknowledge how incredibly privileged we as Australians are and all of the luxuries we have (whether that be the ability to earn enough to live in the suburb we want, to buy coffee when out or to spend $240 a year on takeaway).
    I do agree. We are incredibly lucky to live in Australia, and to have the luxury of choosing to work so we can live in an expensive suburb. We're both tertiary educated adults who have good careers (although on my own I couldn't afford to live where we do), who enjoy both our work and home life. Even though the years I stayed home have set us back financially, we know we can catch up.
    And yes, we could live on a lot less if we had to...but we are lucky that we have a choice in the lifestyle we want. We're also lucky that DH's job is flexible (as long as the work is done...but he can have an hour off to attend a school event etc.), and as a shift worker I'm often available for various things because I'm not working 9-5. I think we'd both struggle working in rigid 9-5 jobs if I'm honest. We love the diversity and flexibility we have.
    Also, in no way am I saying that there is anything wrong with being a sahm...I was one for quite a few years and am so grateful I got that option...but I also think it's okay to have two incomes because you don't like the sacrifices that would allow you to stay home. It has nothing to do with overzealous spending a lot of the time.
    For us, our holidays are always at campgrounds, we had one for car until I started working (not riding my pushbike home after a late shift!), and our tv is old, and is actually glued together. We live in a 3 x 1 modest house, and our kids clothes are Target and Cotton On, or hand me downs. We're not spending like crazy!

  5. #134
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    my house
    Posts
    17,698
    Thanks
    1,391
    Thanked
    7,288
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Renn View Post

    It's fantastic that so many of us HAVE these options, and the ability to decide how we want to live our own lives. What gets me is when people - of whatever income - fail to acknowledge how incredibly privileged we as Australians are and all of the luxuries we have (whether that be the ability to earn enough to live in the suburb we want, to buy coffee when out or to spend $240 a year on takeaway).
    There are also a lot of people who don't have this luxury and are forced to live in "saturated low ses areas" and God forbid send their kids to the "overfull public schools" with all those pesky low ses families

  6. The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to BigRedV For This Useful Post:

    babyno1onboard  (22-04-2016),BornToBe  (23-04-2016),Clementine Grace  (22-04-2016),delirium  (22-04-2016),Nemmi1987  (23-04-2016),Renn  (22-04-2016),witherwings  (22-04-2016),yadot  (22-04-2016)

  7. #135
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    3,431
    Thanks
    1,018
    Thanked
    2,081
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts

    Default If your a sahm/dad how much income?

    I think as a lot of others have said in this thread, you can do it on all wages. Just have to live within your means. We've been on over 300k a year and now we're on quite a bit less and really the only thing that changes is how much we save.

    We're on 1.5 decent wages, now I'm on Mat leave its a bit less but I've found being smart with the money you do have makes your income go further.

    I do a pretty strict monthly budget, we could just spend whatever whenever but if I don't keep track, we easily overspend.

    I think for us the tipping point to be comfortable and not worry about bills and have some to put a little away would be maybe 90-100k. Though if we had to live on less we'd have things that could be scaled back i.e. we pay $700 a month for insurance (health/home/car etc). or we'd have to cut out holidays or luxuries. Having said that I know a few single friends who don't have kids yet and earn $110k + but live from pay to pay and have little savings just due to what they like to spend on or don't budget. So I don't always think it's about much you bring in, but what you do with it.

    We've always tried to live on the bigger wage and save the smaller one, which we have been able to do the last few years but IVF has been a big cost and once we don't have that, it'll make a difference.
    Last edited by Clementine Grace; 22-04-2016 at 20:56.

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to Clementine Grace For This Useful Post:

    delirium  (22-04-2016)

  9. #136
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    22,846
    Thanks
    6,200
    Thanked
    16,892
    Reviews
    10
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 postsDiamond Star - 20,000 posts
    Awards:
    Bubhub Blogger - Thanks100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by Full House View Post
    The assumptions in this thread are rather amusing.
    I was a sahm for years...and DH earns a good wage, but we did struggle because we do live in the 'expensive suburb.' It had nothing to do with being greedy or not being willing to make sacrifices or anything like that.
    My dh's job requires him to work close to the city...so we had a choice...to live in the expensive suburb close to dh's work (so he didn't have 14-15hr days with travel time), be surrounded by great public schools within walking distance, and everything that we love (city life).
    Or, we could live an hour away in a more rural area that is saturated with low ses families, send our children to the overfull public schools, or pay through the roof for the private school (or send our kids to a catholic school when we're atheists....no thanks), DH could spend 2-3hrs travelling each day and we'd have to drive everywhere because there's nothing close and the public transport system is awful.
    We are now a family of two working parents...because we absolutely love the lifestyle we have in our 'expensive suburb,' and have absolutely no desire to move. We'd be absolutely miserable.
    Oh, and if we sold our house to move out we'd be able to buy a house right, and we could both work meaningless part time jobs and live 'the simple life.' But we'd be absolutely miserable.
    Given you have used my wording of expensive suburbs 3 times in your post I've clearly offended you. That certainly wasn't my intention so I'm sorry. But to be fair, the OP was asking for SAHM's and Dads to explain how they managed on such low incomes. Living within your means is pretty much central to how we do it. People are getting into more and more debt and over extending themselves more and more; that isn't opinion, it's fact. If you are happy with your choices then that's great. But there are lots of families that *do* choose a more expensive lifestyle then complain they are broke. In the context of this discussion I don't see my comments as off topic or offensive.

    And I always find the stereotype of the uneducated frumpy housewife with no spine who had better pray her husband doesn't divorce her to be amusing too. Bc anyone that knows me knows that's so not me. But I just have a chuckle and let it wash over me. The world would be a boring place if we all saw it the same way!

  10. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to delirium For This Useful Post:

    cheeeeesecake  (22-04-2016),Renn  (22-04-2016),witherwings  (22-04-2016)

  11. #137
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    3,431
    Thanks
    1,018
    Thanked
    2,081
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts

    Default If your a sahm/dad how much income?

    Honestly too, the families I know who earn more, so maybe 200k+ a year in household income, seemed way more stressed over money. Yep they always have a new car and lovely holidays but money seems to be more of a stressor. The pressure is always on to earn more. Not always, but often. It's often the families I know that do exist on one income of 60-70k and maybe rent because they can't afford to buy, who seem to have a simpler but calmer and happier outlook.

  12. The Following User Says Thank You to Clementine Grace For This Useful Post:

    babyla  (22-04-2016)

  13. #138
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    The Kimberley WA
    Posts
    4,622
    Thanks
    916
    Thanked
    1,180
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Clementine Grace View Post
    Honestly too, the families I know who earn more, so maybe 200k+ a year in household income, seemed way more stressed over money. Yep they always have a new car and lovely holidays but money seems to be more of a stressor. The pressure is always on to earn more. Not always, but often. It's often the families I know that do exist on one income of 60-70k and maybe rent because they can't afford to buy, who seem to have a simpler but calmer and happier outlook.
    I'm glad you said "not always". We had a 3 year period of dh alone earning a little less than the amount you quoted. We had absolutely no stress, we saved, bought another property, did home improvements and could go away on weekends without having to budget. Life was simple and happy.
    We have also been at the other end of the scale being on the absolute bones of our **** at a time dh had an accident not able to work for 2 years. Life was tough, times were hard and we nearly lost all we had. The stress was aweful.
    We are now in the middle income bracket and life is good, we need to watch the budget a little but are comfortable. Life is much less stressful having financial security of some sort. For us having that financial security for our children is very important. For us we wouldn't be comfortable renting and having no property to leave them.

  14. The Following User Says Thank You to Blessedwith3boys For This Useful Post:

    VicPark  (22-04-2016)

  15. #139
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    2,669
    Thanks
    1,004
    Thanked
    2,412
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    There are also a lot of people who don't have this luxury and are forced to live in "saturated low ses areas" and God forbid send their kids to the "overfull public schools" with all those pesky low ses families
    I didn't mean it like that. I grew up in the area I'm talking about, most of my family still live there, and my family are mostly working class. I am not the snob you are making out that I am. But, there is no doubt my kids have a better lifestyle living where we do. I'm glad we can send our kids to a small school of 250, and not to a school that has that amount of kids in one year.
    Did I grow up fine there? Yes. But I'm glad we had the option of being able to choose somewhere else to raise our kids. I'm not apologising for that. If you want to make out I'm a snob because it makes you feel better, go ahead. I'm anything but.

  16. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Full House For This Useful Post:

    Blessedwith3boys  (22-04-2016),VicPark  (22-04-2016)

  17. #140
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    2,669
    Thanks
    1,004
    Thanked
    2,412
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    Given you have used my wording of expensive suburbs 3 times in your post I've clearly offended you. That certainly wasn't my intention so I'm sorry. But to be fair, the OP was asking for SAHM's and Dads to explain how they managed on such low incomes. Living within your means is pretty much central to how we do it. People are getting into more and more debt and over extending themselves more and more; that isn't opinion, it's fact. If you are happy with your choices then that's great. But there are lots of families that *do* choose a more expensive lifestyle then complain they are broke. In the context of this discussion I don't see my comments as off topic or offensive.

    And I always find the stereotype of the uneducated frumpy housewife with no spine who had better pray her husband doesn't divorce her to be amusing too. Bc anyone that knows me knows that's so not me. But I just have a chuckle and let it wash over me. The world would be a boring place if we all saw it the same way!
    Nah, you didn't offend me. Yours was just the most fresh post in my mind. There's been a fair bit of talk about people spending unnecessarily in this thread. I was just trying to point out that it's also okay to have two working parents if you're not willing to make the sacrifices.
    But yes, I get it. I had a woman tell me I was lucky I could stay home, yet her DH earnt more than mine, and they were renting a 6 bedroom house when they were a family of 3, and driving brand new cars. It didn't even compare to how we lived.

  18. The Following User Says Thank You to Full House For This Useful Post:

    VicPark  (22-04-2016)


 

Similar Threads

  1. Salary sacrifice- income CL
    By maternidade in forum Family Finances
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 04-10-2015, 22:00
  2. Overestimated family income
    By Ruby_Tuesday15 in forum Family Finances
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 31-07-2015, 19:00
  3. Taxable income
    By silly in forum General Chat
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 05-07-2015, 12:11

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Einsteinz Music
Make music at Einsteinz Music in age-appropriate class in Sydney's Inner West, Eastern Suburbs or North Shore. For ages 6 mths - 4 yrs. All music is live! Christmas Gift certificates available for full term or casual classes. Call 0431 338 143
sales & new stuffsee all
Pea Pods
Buy 2 Award Winning Pea Pods Reusable One Size Nappies for only $38 (in your choice of colours) and receive a FREE roll of Bamboo Liners. Don't miss out, we don't usually have discounts on the nappies, so grab this special offer!
Special Offer! Save $12
featured supporter
Billington Street
For stationery as unique as you are! ♥ Handmade, custom designed stationery for all of life's celebrations
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!