+ Reply to Thread
Page 7 of 26 FirstFirst ... 5678917 ... LastLast
Results 61 to 70 of 255
  1. #61
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    3,521
    Thanks
    1,318
    Thanked
    1,574
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by sunnygirl79 View Post

    The job was fantastic and I really really loved it but just hated the daycare factor. I excelled in my position and put in loads of effort and planned to negotiate 4 days a week or at least a 9 day fortnight once I had been working there 6 months and they absolutely couldn't do without me. I.e. Get my foot so firmly in the door they couldn't refuse.
    I have always given 100% and thought I could get away with this. Nup! My work was always done and two days ahead at that. When I went on mat leave they had to employ two people to cover my role and when I returned I was able to do it by myself 3 days a week as the work load had reduced slightly. As soon as they found our I was utd again I was moved to a retail/customer service focused role and told my position no longer a business requirement. Less than a week later someone else was moved in on a ft basis from the team I had just been put in. To add to my frustration/anger/disgust, she lacks any experience whatsoever and has been given the opportunity to do further study. Now, instead of patients having everything ready when they come in they are advised of a 2-3 hour wait on presenting despite calling 2-4 days ahead (some have standing monthly orders that just don't get done). This is not the service they are used to but management doesn't care because they have no other option if they want subsidised health care. Another example of discrimination by my management team.
    Last edited by Ngaiz; 17-04-2016 at 08:31.

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    210
    Thanks
    238
    Thanked
    106
    Reviews
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by PinkTutu View Post
    I've been reading along since last night.

    If you want your employer to support you, maybe you need to show that in return you are committed and willing to make sacrifices for them when required.

    "I want to work 3 days", "I can't travel because I bf" and "I can't put in extra hours". Probably aren't going to win you any brownie points. I am not singling anyone out, so if I quoted you please don't take it as a personal attack.

    I've worked for the same org for nearly 6 years and after 18 months I took a year off on mat leave, then returned 4 days, as a rule I am in before 8 and leave a half 4, I'm the only one who does this - no drama. I do have to travel in my job, interstate and NZ, I do this without question when asked and so am only asked when it's really essential/no one else can do it. If DH is traveling I put it in my dairy as far in advance as possible and make it clear I can't travel during that same period. I've worked hard to show that I can do my job and hit targets regardless of having a child and working pt. I went back ft about a year ago.

    Recently I was offered a promotion into a newly created role, and had to tell the GM I am utd, I expected it to be the end of that, and he told me it changed nothing, he'd need to cover me whatever role I was doing and is also fine with me returning to 4 days.

    So supportive employers do exist, and you can keep your career, it's just a bit of a juggle to manage your family and meet their expectations too, the first year is the hardest.

    OP if I were you I'd interview for FT roles, if you can really prove yourself in the first 6 months, you'll probably find you can drop a day down the track. Your Bub will not just survive day care, they will thrive! Good Luck!
    You are obviously in a great supportive workplace which is excellent. You've had a great experience and it's great for you to recognize that. You are in the "right" type of place to be a parent and have a career at the same time.

    Sadly the overwhelming experience of others in this thread is not so positive. I go back to my previous post and say again that there is discrimination against women by women going on too. Your comments imply that everyone who is experiencing setbacks because of their family "should just try harder" to make it work (including just sucking it up). Until you walk a mile in other people's shoes, don't judge them. Celebrate what you have, support others to achieve their goals, and don't presume that you have all the answers.

  3. The Following 11 Users Say Thank You to Happy Camper For This Useful Post:

    AdornedWithCats  (17-04-2016),amyd  (17-04-2016),binnielici  (17-04-2016),Bongley  (18-04-2016),Brain  (26-04-2016),GrabbyCrabby  (17-04-2016),Radio  (17-04-2016),Renn  (17-04-2016),Rose&Aurelia&Hannah  (17-04-2016),Sally1981  (17-04-2016),Wise Enough  (17-04-2016)

  4. #63
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    2,041
    Thanks
    2,298
    Thanked
    1,387
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by JR03 View Post
    To have parenting seen as a parents job, rather than a females job, we need men to be requesting flexibility and taking sick leave to care for their children. For as long as we keep sticking our head in the sand and accepting men saying they can't do this, then women will continue to be discriminated against. If an employer is looking at a man and woman who both have children, they need to realize that both will potentially take time off and request flexibility to care for children, so it's an even playing field and comes down to who is the best person for the role.
    This. 100 times over. The way to end discrimination is to do something about it. Men need to demand the time off and their partners need to put pressure on them to do so if they don't. Of course not always going to work in every situation (eg farming, FIFO, contract work) but it should in most.

  5. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to babyno1onboard For This Useful Post:

    A-Squared  (17-04-2016),Brain  (26-04-2016),Renn  (17-04-2016),Rose&Aurelia&Hannah  (17-04-2016),Sally1981  (17-04-2016)

  6. #64
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    4,786
    Thanks
    1,021
    Thanked
    2,246
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by babyno1onboard View Post
    This. 100 times over. The way to end discrimination is to do something about it. Men need to demand the time off and their partners need to put pressure on them to do so if they don't. Of course not always going to work in every situation (eg farming, FIFO, contract work) but it should in most.
    The problem is that men are scared of losing their jobs too. It's not as Simple as demanding flexible work or time off to care for kids. I remember DS being sick and I had a very important meeting so I called DH to pick him up from care, the response he got for leaving was " don't they know you have a job and can't your wife do it" (from a woman). The economy we are in now it tough and many people are just not in a position to demand anything. Many families are just trying to pay their bills and put food on the table.

  7. The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to Janesmum123 For This Useful Post:

    amiracle4me  (17-04-2016),binnielici  (17-04-2016),cheeeeesecake  (17-04-2016),Freyamum  (18-04-2016),gingermillie  (17-04-2016),GrabbyCrabby  (17-04-2016),ICanDream  (17-04-2016),Ngaiz  (17-04-2016),Rose&Aurelia&Hannah  (17-04-2016)

  8. #65
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    1,374
    Thanks
    774
    Thanked
    1,771
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Janesmum123 View Post
    The problem is that men are scared of losing their jobs too. It's not as Simple as demanding flexible work or time off to care for kids. I remember DS being sick and I had a very important meeting so I called DH to pick him up from care, the response he got for leaving was " don't they know you have a job and can't your wife do it" (from a woman). The economy we are in now it tough and many people are just not in a position to demand anything. Many families are just trying to pay their bills and put food on the table.
    I agree with this. I worked part time after I had my first baby, but she went through a batch of illness at around the same time I started work. I had to cancel important meetings because my dh's work 'doesnt support men taking carers leave' 😐 When I had day surgery & dh had to take a day (ONE DAY) off to look after the kids whilst I was having the surgery, they said to him, 'why can't her mum look after the kids?' Thankfully dh isn't in that job any more, & his new job is very family friendly. But I have slowly given up on the idea of having a career with young children (the main factor being child care for 3 kids costs more than my wage brings in). I am a teacher & I plan to do my masters in a few years time & get my foot back in the door that way (I would be interested to hear how you go with that @Tamtam - what are you doing your masters in?) I also have fully thrown myself into a life as a SAHM & decided that I will embrace this time with gusto!. I volunteer at my kids school, run a community group (which is related to my field of early childhood education), work with a local health group providing social support for mums with PND, & work with another community group providing support to a range of people - particularly elderly. I do all of my activities with my kids in tow, so it's hard sometimes, but I love what I do & feel like I have the opportunity at this time in my life to help my community. We are on a single 60k income, but we do ok - the thing I struggle with is feeling valuable in what I do (oh, you're just a SAHM? Why dont you work?) I know this lifestyle doesnt work for everyone, but it works for us.

  9. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to cheeeeesecake For This Useful Post:

    A-Squared  (17-04-2016),Rose&Aurelia&Hannah  (17-04-2016),VicPark  (17-04-2016)

  10. #66
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    916
    Thanks
    120
    Thanked
    494
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Wow.. Thank you everyone for your responses. It's been really interesting ( if not a little sad ) to read them. I guess this is all new to me so it's good to understand the lay of the land and my options.

    I think @PinkTutu makes some valid points. I was open in my interview about wanted to BF my baby on my lunchbreak as the CCC was literally next door. I was also asked if I could travel interstate and I said that would be hard. In hindsight I should have kept the BF idea to myself and said yes to travel and figured it out later. I've certainly learnt my lesson and will be very prepared the next time!

    I don't agree tho that we should just work harder and smarter.. It's genuinely hard to find the right hours at the right skill level and I've got some mummy friends who have been shafted royally by work but are to scared to leave as they know getting a new P/T job at a senior level is impossible.

    For all of those ladies feeling down about yourself too. I'm sorry. It's made me feel less alone tho so thank you for sharing. I hope you get back into the workforce with your dream job soon.

    I think everyone is comfortable with CC at their own pace. I only walked round one centre the other day ( next to where I interviewed ) and I wasn't 100% comfortable with leaving my DD there now at her age. So maybe it's a blessing in disguise.

    I think I'll wait till she's about 14 months and then look for full time and/or negotiate 4 days a week. The thought of being out of the workforce for many years is both depressing and scary.

    If I can't find anything then I'll finally start the degree I wanted to do and volunteer in my field to keep relevance.

    With regards to the other debate re: the male picking up care. My DH gets 2 months paid parental leave so his work is very family friendly. He does however bring in double my salary and has a lot more on due to being a senior manager so of course it wouldn't make sense to ask him to share 50:50.. The problem isn't at family level but needs to be lobbied higher up. There should be a mandatory that employers need to offer at least 10% of jobs as part time or job share.

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to amiracle4me For This Useful Post:

    AdornedWithCats  (17-04-2016)

  12. #67
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    2,041
    Thanks
    2,298
    Thanked
    1,387
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Janesmum123 View Post
    The problem is that men are scared of losing their jobs too. It's not as Simple as demanding flexible work or time off to care for kids. I remember DS being sick and I had a very important meeting so I called DH to pick him up from care, the response he got for leaving was " don't they know you have a job and can't your wife do it" (from a woman). The economy we are in now it tough and many people are just not in a position to demand anything. Many families are just trying to pay their bills and put food on the table.
    I'm not saying it's easy or simple but without pressure there will be no change.

  13. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to babyno1onboard For This Useful Post:

    Bongley  (18-04-2016),Brain  (26-04-2016)

  14. #68
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    916
    Thanks
    120
    Thanked
    494
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by cheeeeesecake View Post
    I agree with this. I worked part time after I had my first baby, but she went through a batch of illness at around the same time I started work. I had to cancel important meetings because my dh's work 'doesnt support men taking carers leave' 😐 When I had day surgery & dh had to take a day (ONE DAY) off to look after the kids whilst I was having the surgery, they said to him, 'why can't her mum look after the kids?' Thankfully dh isn't in that job any more, & his new job is very family friendly. But I have slowly given up on the idea of having a career with young children (the main factor being child care for 3 kids costs more than my wage brings in). I am a teacher & I plan to do my masters in a few years time & get my foot back in the door that way (I would be interested to hear how you go with that @Tamtam - what are you doing your masters in?) I also have fully thrown myself into a life as a SAHM & decided that I will embrace this time with gusto!. I volunteer at my kids school, run a community group (which is related to my field of early childhood education), work with a local health group providing social support for mums with PND, & work with another community group providing support to a range of people - particularly elderly. I do all of my activities with my kids in tow, so it's hard sometimes, but I love what I do & feel like I have the opportunity at this time in my life to help my community. We are on a single 60k income, but we do ok - the thing I struggle with is feeling valuable in what I do (oh, you're just a SAHM? Why dont you work?) I know this lifestyle doesnt work for everyone, but it works for us.
    Lovely to read the positivity your moving forward with! Your obviously very valuable in your community so don't ever feel otherwise 😘

  15. #69
    AdornedWithCats's Avatar
    AdornedWithCats is online now Winner 2013 - Spirit of BubHub Award
    Winner 2014 - Best Username

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    7,810
    Thanks
    6,768
    Thanked
    3,405
    Reviews
    16
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the WeekBusiest Member of the Week - week ended 12/6/15Funniest Caption400 Posts in a week300 posts in a week
    This is a big problem generally in society at the moment - highly skilled/experienced women not returning to work after children (whether they want to or not) or having to settle for a lower position than they are actually qualified for due to lack of flexibility etc.

    I'm lucky atm in that I'm studying postgraduately which pays a small scholarship which is reasonably flexible. My dh can't take time off at all as he is a casual worker - so dodgy as he works full time regular hours but due to his award his employer has no obligation to offer a permanent contract. So if he takes time off, dh doesn't get paid. That leaves me to deal with it if ds sick or anything. Dh is studying atm so hopefully that will lead to a more family friendly career which will mean I can persue mine once I've finished my degree.

    I'm involved in a group at uni whose aim is to improve the situation of women in my area (science). Unfortunately a huge number of highly qualified and intelligent women end up leaving science.

  16. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to AdornedWithCats For This Useful Post:

    Brain  (26-04-2016),Sally1981  (17-04-2016)

  17. #70
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    1,280
    Thanks
    665
    Thanked
    651
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by babyno1onboard View Post
    This. 100 times over. The way to end discrimination is to do something about it. Men need to demand the time off and their partners need to put pressure on them to do so if they don't. Of course not always going to work in every situation (eg farming, FIFO, contract work) but it should in most.
    This. The only way things can change is if men start demanding their right to be equal parents. I don't think that supportive employers who are open to parents working part time should also be lumped with that parent taking all the carers leave. After all, a part time worker taking a day off is a higher percentage of their week than a full time worker. I know it's not that simple, but it is a fact that in order for things to change, men and men's industries need to change.
    @PinkTutu, I get what you're saying and you clearly work hard, but you have been lucky. I made it clear to my employer that I understood my 3 day week would include being available by phone on my days off, having DH do the daycare pickup on my work days so I could work back unpaid, being available for reasonable travel, and using my remote login to to extra work when needed. Still not good enough, apparently. Some employers just have a 'bums in seats' mentality when it comes to dedication to a company.

  18. The Following User Says Thank You to Sally1981 For This Useful Post:

    Brain  (26-04-2016)


 

Similar Threads

  1. Tell me about your career change?
    By jez in forum Working Hubbers - Employed
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 21-07-2015, 23:21
  2. Have you left your career?
    By Cue in forum General Chat
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 25-05-2015, 13:37
  3. Help-Career advice !
    By MummaJugs3 in forum General Chat
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 20-04-2015, 00:41

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Ro&Co
Share magical moments this Christmas with this gorgeous gingerbread house. Exclusively available in Brisbane, with FREE delivery in Brisbane Metro areas. Each Christmas Centrepiece is unique and made to order, from $240.
sales & new stuffsee all
Pea Pods
Buy 2 Award Winning Pea Pods Reusable One Size Nappies for only $38 (in your choice of colours) and receive a FREE roll of Bamboo Liners. Don't miss out, we don't usually have discounts on the nappies, so grab this special offer!
Special Offer! Save $12
featured supporter
Ro and Co
Ro and Co kids cooking classes and parties are a fantastic way for children to experiment with food. The classes and parties are designed to be both educational and fun, giving your child the skills they need to be confident and creative in the kitchen.
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!