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  1. #171
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    Quote Originally Posted by A-Squared View Post
    @Cue how did you mention the 4 days? Was it when they asked if you had any questions for them? Or did you bring it up in some other way? What did you say? Maybe a few of us can get tips on what to say in interviews to get a positive response for working part time.

    Also, what industry are you in?
    With this job specifically, I was recommended for the role by an old colleague who currently works there. So she knew I wanted part time and mentioned it to her manager before I applied. The interview was very conversational/informal so I brought it up to confirm that the person interviewing me knew I was wanting 4 days. I also stated that I had held a senior role in another agency in a part time capacity, so I was able to demonstrate that I could manage my time successfully at reduced hours.

    I went for another agency role a couple of months ago which was through a recruiter, so I discussed the part-time thing with the recruiter first and they discussed it with the employer before putting me forward. I still got an interview but didn't get the job.

    I think if I interview at another place for something that's advertised as full time, I wouldn't bring up part time unless I really had to in the first interview. I'd wait until they offered a second interview and then say something like "I'm really excited to explore this role further as it sounds great. I want to let you know I am available to work 4 days per week and believe I can be very effective in this role at the reduced hours"... Or something along those lines depending on the situation. I think most employers have made a decision on who they want after first interview and second interview is more of a formality, so if they are keen they may be willing to consider part time. If they say no, it's not the right role.

    I work in digital marketing and am client-facing. The challenge I have had is that lots of agencies have the mentality that client-facing roles have to be full time, which is rubbish really. It's all about managing expectations and having the right processes in place. I have always been happy to take calls and check emails on my days off for anything really urgent, but generally it's completely workable. Unfortunately my industry has a bad track record of working people into the ground and expecting way too much commitment. Most people burn out, change career paths, or go client-side at some point in order to get their lives back!

  2. #172
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    @Cue - it will be lovely if you get the job. So great to see an employer appreciating what you have to offer and not seeing family as a "distraction"!

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  4. #173
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    In the interview they told me that pretty much everyone in the office has kids so they all get it. It really does sound like a great job, fingers crossed! I have a phone interview with one of the other senior managers on Friday, hopefully that goes well!

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  6. #174
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    Quote Originally Posted by harvs View Post
    This made me realise I want to do the opposite but have ended up replicating ������I nearly went insane on my 15 months off from work. Going back to a job I love was like coming up for air. But I hated that my mum was never around for my special school events, and now I'm inflicting that on my son. I receive no child support so I don't have the luxury of choice anyway, I guess. Bleurgh. It's all so effing hard.
    @harvs Yes, I'm in a similar situation, I wanted to do things differently.
    Except..... I remember my parents not bothering with anything, homework, grades, parent teacher meetings, nothin. I took a kind of pride in it at the time but it still irked me how they really didn't (seem to) care, maybe it's because I was doing ok and not getting into trouble (I was also the youngest of three....probably had something to do with it) . I've promised myself I will take more interest in my sons, even though I do work full time. Even if I can't attend special events there will be other ways I can engage. Hopefully?

  7. #175
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sally1981 View Post
    @witherwings, you raise a very interesting point there. They noted a lack of 'seniority' as one of the reasons for backtracking on a verbal agreement that I could work part time.

    Using my work as an example, that was actually age-based discrimination. I was an untitled solicitor who had been there for 8 years. No one in the firm had ever been promoted to senior associate when they were under 35. So what they were actually doing was restricting part time work to people over a certain age, which is illegal.
    Wow, I didn't know people did this - obviously it's totally illegal but I guess if you don't explicitly say that is what you are doing, how can anyone prove discrimination? 8 years in the same company though? That would make you very senior in my eyes. Our senior accountant who is the same age as myself (the one who works from home 3 days a week) has been with us for about 5 years.

  8. #176
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    Quote Originally Posted by witherwings View Post
    Wow, I didn't know people did this - obviously it's totally illegal but I guess if you don't explicitly say that is what you are doing, how can anyone prove discrimination?
    It's very difficult. In my experience standard response has generally been along the lines of 'your request does not fit with the requirements of the business'.

  9. #177
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    Quote Originally Posted by harvs View Post

    I nearly went insane on my 15 months off from work. Going back to a job I love was like coming up for air. But I hated that my mum was never around for my special school events, and now I'm inflicting that on my son.
    You can still attend special events and be a working parent. Would your employer allow you half a day off to attend a carnival, concert, award ceremony etc? How often do those come up anyway? And parent-teacher meetings happen after work hours..

    Surely you can take time off work for family things with reasonable notice.. Right?

    I'll be taking time off to attend whatever my kids need, I'll go out of my way to be involved. That doesn't change the fact that I want to have a career. Being a working mum and being an involved parent are not mutually exclusive concepts, and I'm surprised that so many people here are implying that they are.

    Also, I understand not wanting to make sacrifices for a job that you're not passionate about, but if it's just a job that you do to bring in some $ but have no particular emotional connection with, then I can't see that as giving up a career. You can always find some sort of work to supplement the family income.

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  11. #178
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    Law firms I find, for obvious reasons, are very good at skirting the edge of the law with respect to discrimination. My situation was clearly discrimination BUT i could not have pointed to single verifiable comment or action in order to do anything about it. Whilst I had colleagues agree with me - because they could see what was happening - not a one would put their name to paper for fear of jeopardising their own career!

  12. #179
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    Default Is your career really ruined when you have a baby?

    Quote Originally Posted by witherwings View Post

    Surely you can take time off work for family things with reasonable notice.. Right?

    I'll be taking time off to attend whatever my kids need, I'll go out of my way to be involved. That doesn't change the fact that I want to have a career. Being a working mum and being an involved parent are not mutually exclusive concepts, and I'm surprised that so many people here are implying that they are.
    Not necessarily. At firms I've worked for in the past unless you had airfares booked they would always find away to cancel or amend your leave - for genuine business reasons obviously (eg: your matter was set down for trial and they would not allow you to hand it off to another lawyer). They also would not allow half days of annual leave. personal leave for medical appointments required a half day of leave even if your appointment meant leaving 30 minutes early or arriving 30 minutes late!

    Another reason could be a lack of leave. When kids have 8-12 weeks school holidays a year and you have 4 weeks annual leave (and no partner to share) it gets tricky to justify taking leave to attend a school play.

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  14. #180
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    Have you thought about starting your own law firm? What about a completely different business model?

    A client of mine has a law firm that provides virtual legal counsel for businesses, so rather than employing a full time lawyer in your firm, you have these contractors on a retainer. They also provide one-off services for a set fee rather than charge by the hour. Businesses love this idea, similar to having a virtual CFO.

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    binnielici  (20-04-2016),TeaM  (20-04-2016),turquoisecoast  (20-04-2016)


 

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