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  1. #171
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    Quote Originally Posted by witherwings View Post
    Ah ok, I'm sorry you have had that experience, and also sorry that you've had to defend your choice. What a strange thing to do have to.. Obviously parents choices are based on what is best for their children and their family. What is there to defend?

    On the topic of how students are selected for private placement, I did a little investigating and it looks like the waiting list is only the first stage. I'm not sure how reliable this information is, but here is the usual process, according to this site: https://www.schoolplaces.com.au/arti...olment-process

    Applying for a school.


    The start of the enrolment process is often the most complicated step for parents. While some schools don’t have a waitlist for prospective students (meaning they accept students on a ‘first-come, first-served’ basis), other schools do.


    It’s important to note, that a waitlist is often a reflection of parents’ demand for a particular year level at a school and doesn’t necessarily mean its quality of teaching is superior to schools without one. Waitlists are mainly used for key intake years such as pre-grade 1 (Prep/Kinder/Reception) or Year 7. For those year levels, getting your child’s name down early on a waitlist can be an advantage. Expect to pay a waitlist fee and to wait until around two years out from the enrolment year before receiving an admission offer. As there’s no guarantee a child on a waitlist will receive an admission offer, many parents opt to play it safe and put their child’s name down at multiple schools.


    If you didn’t manage to register your child on a waitlist upon leaving hospital after their birth, don’t panic! There are other options to consider. Sometimes enrolling your child in an earlier or later year level, where there may be less demand, is a way to secure a spot at the same school. Doing a quick search on School Places will also reveal which schools in your area may have last minute, unexpected vacancies that they’re looking to fill for the year level that you’re after.


    The next step is to prepare for the enrolment form completion. For this, parents need to collect and submit copies of their child’s key documents, such as a birth certificate, immunisation records and sometimes baptism certificates, if the private school is affiliated with a religion. This will kick start the next round of the enrolment process - interviewing and testing.


    Interviewing and Testing.


    In order to process a student’s application, a school will invite the student to attend a personal interview and, depending on the school and the intake year, sit a series of tests.


    For students entering primary school, it may simply be a basic Q&A session with your child. For children of this age, schools are generally looking for language abilities to help them identify whether the child may require education assistance.


    For students entering secondary school, this step is a more rigorous process. Aside from reviewing the student’s past academic records and evaluating their interests, the school may expect all applicants to complete written tests, aptitude tests, language tests and numeric reasoning tests.


    Students entering secondary school years will be interviewed, too. During this step, schools examine the general presentation of a student - if they are well-spoken, can converse and if they fit in well with the school’s culture.
    This is largely true except my school doesn't have written tests. You do have an interview with the head of school but I'm told 1 in 1000 wouldn't then go on to be offered a place.

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  3. #172
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    I want to clarify - I do not have an issue if someone chooses private over public.

    I will most likely send my DS (and probably DD) to the local primary school. It is a good school (I did also ask 100000 questions to a teacher friend who had a placement there a few years ago) and has lots of community involvement. And it literally is on the street behind us.

    For high school I am not sure. The public high school currently has a good reputation and does well. Has good facilities etc etc. But I do want to see how DS goes in primary school first.

    I am not a fan of the private schools in my immediate area. But things can change in the next 7 years or so.

  4. #173
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tamtam View Post
    @witherwings I am simply saying that status or results are a small factor generally.
    That may be true for you and many others, but there are some people for which this is the #1 reason and theres absolutely nothing wrong with that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by witherwings View Post
    That may be true for you and many others, but there are some people for which this is the #1 reason and theres absolutely nothing wrong with that.
    I would imagine it's only a minority. Because no school I've worked in did I meet a parent who was there for that reason. Or do I have any friends who put their kids in private for that reason either. I don't think the majority of people are that superficial.

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    Default Taxpayers fund private school orchestra pits and swimming pools...

    Quote Originally Posted by Tamtam View Post
    I would imagine it's only a minority. Because no school I've worked in did I meet a parent who was there for that reason. Or do I have any friends who put their kids in private for that reason either. I don't think the majority of people are that superficial.
    Because of the stigma associated with status being a major reason, I doubt many would admit that being their reason, but results are certainly a major factor in people's choices, and this was the one I was particularly referring to.
    Last edited by witherwings; 13-04-2016 at 18:29.

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    I think that status might be a part for the super elite schools but the run of Mill private school it isn't really a big deal.

    Our school are a large number of single mums on pensions, low income families like us and than some people regular income people, than we do have some High income earners but they aren't the biggest subset.

    For most people at our school it's the faith. They wanted a independent Christian school.

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  9. #177
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    In high school I attended an elite private girls' school and then a standard state school. Whilst I fully admit that my views are tainted by my own awful experiences of the private school I recognise that my experiences are not typical. My parents sent me there "because it was the sort of school that you can say, 'I went to school with that person' in years to come".

    Whilst there is more likelihood that the Blue Wiggle will be the next PM than me to send my children to a private school that doesn't mean I judge those that do, we all do what we believe is in the best interest of our children. In years to come DH and I may consider sending DS to a local Academy that specialising in maths and science as DS is proving to be very strong in this area so I may be eating my words...

    Finally, just to re-emphasise, the most significant point of the article posted was the ridiculous differences in resources and facilities between elite private schools and local state schools. DD started prep this year and they often run out of soap in the prep toilets. Soap. Meanwhile another school has a new hall with an orchestra pit. It just doesn't seem right.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Busy-Bee View Post
    In years to come DH and I may consider sending DS to a local Academy that specialising in maths and science as DS is proving to be very strong in this area so I may be eating my words...
    You can rest easy. If your local academy is what I'm thinking of, and I'm sure it is because I also live in Brisbane and considered it for one of mine, it is actually a selective state highschool. There are fees, but it isn't private.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Renn View Post
    You know what? I'm undoubtedly in the minority, but I don't believe students should receive the same government funding regardless of sector. I think that if parents want to pay for a different kind of schooling then that's fine, but it needn't be subsidised by the state.

    Yes, private schooling means less of a 'burden' on the public system, but it also means that a significant proportion of the population are no longer invested in quality public education. If you feel that you can easily opt out and find something better, what motivation do you have to demand improvements in the public system? You know, the system which is the only option for many children, including the most disadvantaged.
    A lot of people will still care very much about the public education system, even if they do not have children that attend public schools. Just because someone sends their kids to a private school doesn't mean they don't have a social conscious.

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  14. #180
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    Quote Originally Posted by Busy-Bee View Post
    In high school I attended an elite private girls' school and then a standard state school. Whilst I fully admit that my views are tainted by my own awful experiences of the private school I recognise that my experiences are not typical. My parents sent me there "because it was the sort of school that you can say, 'I went to school with that person' in years to come".

    Whilst there is more likelihood that the Blue Wiggle will be the next PM than me to send my children to a private school that doesn't mean I judge those that do, we all do what we believe is in the best interest of our children. In years to come DH and I may consider sending DS to a local Academy that specialising in maths and science as DS is proving to be very strong in this area so I may be eating my words...

    Finally, just to re-emphasise, the most significant point of the article posted was the ridiculous differences in resources and facilities between elite private schools and local state schools. DD started prep this year and they often run out of soap in the prep toilets. Soap. Meanwhile another school has a new hall with an orchestra pit. It just doesn't seem right.
    Is the lack of soap because they can't afford to buy it or because the person responsible for topping it up needing to lift their game a bit?


 

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