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  1. #91
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    I used to regularly get a bloody nose because the classroom was so hot in primary school, but you're right, that's just me being too precious 😑

  2. #92
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    Generally I agree about air con. But we live in an area that is very hot all of Nov through to beginning of March. We get 45 and 46 degrees fairly regularly and often for 4-5 days straight.

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  4. #93
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    I know I posted about the air conditioning....
    So in response to that. ...
    I've taught without air conditioning. ..and with it.
    Gosh it makes a huge difference to the kids. Especially in summer in QLD. It honestly does. They concentrate so much better in the afternoons.
    We wouldn't like to work to an office or building without air con. So why make kids and teachers?
    Sorry but I do agree that all schools in our hot climate should have it. It's definitely worth the money
    ETA i usually run AC all first term and 4th term. .. and somrtimes the heat on reversecycle if the kids ask. It gets used more than half of the year.

    Sorry for typos
    Last edited by Tamtam; 12-04-2016 at 17:26.

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  6. #94
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    I do think aircon is mostly neccesary. We also have weeks of 45deg+, & I have taught in transportable little hot boxes that reach inside temperatures of 45+ without aircon. In fact, one day the power was out, & it was cooler outside than inside the classroom. Outside was 46deg. It also gets down to 0% in winter. Proper heating and cooling is needed for optimum teaching & learning. We wouldnt expect an adult to work in those conditions, so why expect the students and teachers?

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  8. #95
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    Default Taxpayers fund private school orchestra pits and swimming pools...

    Quote Originally Posted by NancyBlackett View Post
    The government contribution to Pymble is about $3000. So $22k comes from parents.

    I know 'government' funding for schools is an emotive issue. I often get frustrated when people compare federal contributions to public (state) schools and private or independent schools. States are constitutionally responsible for their schools. Historically, Federal Governments have contributed towards non-government schools. It evolved into also topping up state school funding. And now all of a sudden if they aren't meeting the entire cost of educating children through the state system they are doing the wrong thing.

    What's the solution? Abolish all non-government schools and specifically tax parents that were previously paying $30k a year at their private school so that money can go towards their local state school?

    I agree with BigRed that the quality of teaching isn't automatically better at private schools, and per student funding certainly isn't a way to judge the quality of teaching - nor is naplan, of course. But the fact remains, parents want options, the States have no obligations to fund independent schools so the federal government does. It doesn't have an obligation to fund state schools, yet it does as well.
    Pymble Ladies' College received over $8,000,000 in government funding in 2014. Of that, over $3,000,000 was from the state government and over $5,000,000 from the federal government. That is a ridiculous amount of money for a school that charges almost $18,000 per student for kindergarten and over $25,000 for year 11 and 12 students. That is a truck load of cash for a school with 2100 students. And to think what a public school could do with just one of those student's school fees.

    ETA - edited to correct prices
    Last edited by BigRedV; 12-04-2016 at 19:52.

  9. #96
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    Hmmmm $8m for 2100 students doesn't actually sound too high.
    Reading the comments in this thread has definitely made me reconsider my original stance on this issue.
    I still think, as others above has said, that government funds shouldn't go toward private school capital works.

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  11. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by witherwings View Post
    Hmmmm $8m for 2100 students doesn't actually sound too high.
    Now that you say it, it's $3800 per student.

    I just checked myschools website - I compared the total government funding for a very well known low ses school nearby (one of the most challenging schools in the state) , a high fee elite school (most expensive in the state) & my school (low fee private school).

    These were stats for government funding for each school -

    Elite school - $4.500 per student
    Low fee private - $8,000 per student
    Low ses public - $21,000 per student

    I was actually completely blown away by the amount of funding the low ses public school gets. Honestly, it seems fair to me. The government funding would be based on the level of disadvantage faced by each school.

    In fact,the low ses school would have an almost identical income to pymble ladies mentioned by BigRedV earlier - who receives $3800 from the govt & 18000 in school fees.

    ETA - I also checked each schools total income per student (which includes parent contributions + government funding). The stats were -

    Elite school - $24,000 per student
    Low fee private - $11,000 per student
    Low ses public - $21,000 per student

    It made me feel proud of what my school achieves on what is essentially half the funding per student of both the low ses and elite schools!
    Last edited by cheeeeesecake; 12-04-2016 at 21:23.

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  13. #98
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    I did a similar comparison with my local area!

    All the schools in my local area have a high ICSEA so they are quite comparable. There are probably about the same number of government schools as non-gov in my area.

    Government funding p/student (state and federal)
    Private girls 7-12 - 8500
    Private religious co-ed k-12 - 5000
    Private boys k-12 - 3100
    Private girls k-12 - $3300
    Public primary school - 8000
    Public high school - 13000

    These are all within about 5km of each other in very affluent part of Sydney

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  15. #99
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    There is a scale for low SES schools. I just checked my kids school and each child gets $11800. We have the largest housing commission section of the community in our zone and a third of the student population is Indigenous.

    In comparison the Catholic primary gets $10900. $900 per student less.

    Our local public high gets $16k, the Catholic high gets $15500. I'm shocked.

    To get 21k per student the needs must be extreme. And let's remember we are still under Gonski funding. Which won't be there much longer.
    Last edited by delirium; 12-04-2016 at 21:34.

  16. #100
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    This is kind of off topic (relates to an aside above about education outcomes not relying on private vs public but more reliant on the SES) .. my brother and I went to different schools for most of our schooling life. We both attended a private religious school from Yr 5 (for him), year 3 (for me). But I left to go to public school from year 5 onwards and my brother stayed in private until year 10, then he switched to the local public school (mainly due to bullying by students AND teachers!). I went in and out of various public schools, and ended up in the same high school as my brother for my last 3 years of high school. He was 2 grades above me. We both ended up with very similar UAIs, both did similar degrees at uni and post grad professional courses, and both work in exactly the same profession now (often together). Despite him having mostly a private education, he and I turned out to have very similar achievements in our education and career.

    Even though my husband and I could stretch ourselves to put our kids in private school, we won't because I don't think they will necessarily get a better education (since the local public schools here are so good).

    I also personally don't like the stigma associated with having a private school education, or the social pressure from other families to have a certain lifestyle. I'm only speaking from my personal experience, and that of my family members (who currently attend "elite" private schools). I'm always hearing about how they have to outdo the other families when it comes to holiday destinations, cars and clothes, birthday parties etc. I hated being ostracised for not being as wealthy as others when I was in private primary school, that's why I chose to get out and go to public school while my brother stayed.


 

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