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  1. #21
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    My eldest has sensory issues with some foods, I do lots of what I call 'snack plates' which is just small portion of the dinner I'd like him to eat and bits and pieces of things he can tolerate as well as something I know he cannot yet. I have far more success with this than anything else and his range is ever so slowly widening. GL

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    Redcorset  (29-03-2016)

  3. #22
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    Always. We offer the kids (now 3.5 and 10 months) food at certain times...although the 10 month old occasionally eats separately if he's been asleep for lunch/a snack. If it's a new food/meal, then there's always something else familiar with it. If they eat what they have, they can have more. If they don't eat it, that's fine. No...with a baby/young toddler, I don't know WHY they're not eating, but I respect that they're not. I'm not going to try to get them to eat because I think they should when, clearly, they don't want to. They'll get another chance to eat at the next meal or snack.

    ETA: I'm lucky in that my kids are generally good eaters. If my eldest knew she could get away with it, she'd certainly demand to eat her favourite foods all the time, and would have from a young age, but our approach has ensure that she knows that isn't an option. It would definitely be different with a different kind of child though. I really don't know what I'd do in your situation. It must be hard.
    Last edited by Renn; 29-03-2016 at 20:03.

  4. #23
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    My DS2, 3.5 years is extremely fussy. I suspect there may be sensory issues and I'm starting to talk to DH about what next.

    Presently I will offer what we are having (I generally have to make at least 2 meals anyway due to me being vego and my food allergies), something he has eaten in the past and it's a good chance he will eat again and something new.

    I always put vegetables and fruit on his plate even though I know 9/10 he won't touch any of it. I also ask him to just smell or lick new foods. I have told him if he wants to take a bite but doesn't like it he can spit it out. No pressure here.

    Like you I worry about his size and weight he's 95cm and weighs just under 12 kgs.

  5. #24
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    I wouldn't be offering another food after meals, but as some PP's suggested, I would be putting a plate together with the dinner and something they will eat. When my kids were younger they had to at least have a lick of every food, now they need to have a bite or more.

    Personally I think that age is just a little too young to do the 'eat this or go hungry', as they wouldn't really understand the consequence of that. But I definitely wouldn't be fetching another food.

  6. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrsIsMe View Post
    My eldest has sensory issues with some foods, I do lots of what I call 'snack plates' which is just small portion of the dinner I'd like him to eat and bits and pieces of things he can tolerate as well as something I know he cannot yet. I have far more success with this than anything else and his range is ever so slowly widening. GL
    This, and what @deku said.
    I try to include the food I know DD will eat in the dinner plate I give her rather then give it to her after dinner, so that she doesn't learn to "hold out" for her favourites. DD has some weird food combinations at times, but she doesn't know better, and sometimes it turns out that pear dipped in baked bean sauce is yummy! (For her anyway)

  7. #26
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    You've probably already done this, but just in case....

    My DD was a terrible eater from the start, and from about 12 months, I started reading her books all through her meals. It distracted her enough that I could shovel in enough food, (and it also really helped her vocabulary....) I know it isn't great table etiquette, but it worked for us. I also had one friend that put on the TV for meals. Lots of parents wouldn't approve, but I guess it's weighing up what's worse - the extra screen time or the empty tummy!

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    A-Squared  (31-03-2016)

  9. #27
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    So I'm not sure if should weigh in. ..as my daughter does have a syndrome that causes her to be a very poor eater. Very poor. She is supplemented with pediasure.
    But with food. ..since she was about 2 I've just offered her some foods I know she'll refuse and then more familiar foods.
    Eg..maybe spaghetti bolognaise, cheese and then a fruit she might not eat but week tolerate in front her. It's important to keep offering food that she may refuse as you never know when it will be accepted.
    Does your daughter tolerate new foods in front of her? Or does she get upset? Or just push away? Does she ever taste?
    I have always tried to offer something that I know she'll eat (yogurt or cheese etc)... so I know she'll get something.
    But otherwise. .it's very very common that food is refused. And I don't offer anything else. That said she drinks pediasure during the day so it's pressure off a bit.
    However. ..I have cried a lot over meals and food wastage. A lot.
    Seriously. ..a lot! You are not alone.
    It's a very very stressful road the not eating scenario.

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    Albert01  (30-03-2016)

  11. #28
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    Oh. Also, your DD may be too young still (I do not remember when I started this with DS) but I started getting him to help prep food. So, we would bake together (and only recently has he started eating muffins we bake and I think its because he helped). We mixed stuff. We talked about food. I did not expect him to eat it at the beginning and there was refusal of anything for ages but sometimes it helps him try new stuff out now.

    It is frustrating and messy but it has helped a little.

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  13. #29
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    This is not something to be upset about. Big hugs. Take a step back and just feed her what ever she will eat. It's not worth getting upset about. I think it's way to young to not give food if they don't like what you have them. I think that's at least for over 6 years old.

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  15. #30
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    My rule is they have to try it. If they try it and don't like it then they can have fruit, yoghurt or cheese. If they don't try it there's nothing else. But 18m is too young for this approach.

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    Sonja  (29-03-2016)


 

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