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  1. #1
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    Default Help! I'm at my wits end!

    But if a vent I guess. At what age do you offer dinner and if it's not eaten, too bad there's nothing else to eat?

    I sat and cried while bathing miss 18 months after she refused to eat dinner yet again. What do I do? Let her sit there til she at least tries her food? Give her something she will eat after offering dinner (very limited list and would likely be weetbix, bread, cheese) or just say if you don't eat that's it?

    It's always been a struggle to feed her. She's super fussy and they have said it's probably sensory. She's not a big kid at all. She gets her measurements done on Friday. I'm so drained with the constant struggle.

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    Default Help! I'm at my wits end!

    we started at 15mo

    It's hard but try and take the emotions out of it. You're job is to offer good food, her job is to feed herself or not!

    ETA if it's sensory my advice probably don't stand.... Not sure how to tackle that one!
    Last edited by ExcuseMyFrench; 29-03-2016 at 18:03.

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    Not the best person to ask but my DS did not eat. Is still fussy. At that age I just gave him ANYTHING he would eat. I was still BF. I started giving him 'grazing/tasting' plates and I still do.

    I provide 'new' food, previously given food that may have been ignored or tried and food I know he will eat.

    He eventually tried more food. He is a lot better than he was and if I ask him to try everything he will taste it. He generally says yuck but after a few more tries here and there sometimes ends up eating it.

    It stressed me out so much. Still does sometimes.

    It is so hard when other kids eat everything and your kid eats yoghurt and cruskits....

    ETA. I end up giving him what he will eat if he eats nothing.

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    We started pretty young also. Not long after 1 for all of ours. They have to sit there til everyone is done. Then if they are still refusing to eat, too bad so sad. That goes for all of my children, including my one with autism/sensory issues. However I do try to make sure it's good I know they eat. Like I don't consistently give my eldest tomatoes, or I let him pick them out because I know he hates them, but he is expected to eat all the other veggies and I don't make separate meals for anyone.

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    I just let them eat what we are eating for dinner and if they refuse, well no more food until next snack/meal time. I know it is easier said than done though, you worry about them going hungry! The stage will pass before you know it

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    From 18mths old we do the - you get what you are given and you have 30min to eat.

    Then food is removed with no alternatives till the next meal.

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    And they have to go through that phase anyway. It's a sign that their brains is growing

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    Oh my gosh I totally understand. my DD is exactly the same and she's 5. I feel your pain. At 18 months i thought it was normal fussy toddler stage but as time went on she got worse and ate less and less. After looking into it I realised it was a sensory thing for her too. I tired everything from bribes to offering nothing else if she didn't eat it. I tried forcing it in her mouth in times of complete frustration. Nothing worked. I've got eye rolls from my mum and mil which is upsetting and annoying to me. At 5 she still only eats very plain and nothing is allowed to touch the other food on the plate. She eats plain rice, plain pasta, some fruit, smiley fritz, 1 type of wrap and chicken nuggets and fish fingers. raw carrot only. Peas still frozen never cooked. It's stressful but after seeing how my DS eats I realise it's her, not me. I now just serve what i know she will eat. On repeat. She's healthy, happy and learns well. Some kids are just testing the boundaries and others have an actual fear of new food. Mine is the latter. If yours is too there is not much you can do. My DD also has some other sensory issues but so far nothing that causes problems. If/when it does i would seek professional help. For now try not to stress!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rose&Aurelia&Hannah View Post
    From 18mths old we do the - you get what you are given and you have 30min to eat.

    Then food is removed with no alternatives till the next meal.
    We do this. Aside from the fruit bowl which they pretty much help themselves to.

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    Oh and I should add, my son with autism refused dinner every day for a few weeks a little while back. But there was no harm done. He ate his breakfast and lunch just fine. And he was still as much of an athlete as always.
    Skipping dinner really isn't the end of the world I don't think. I, personally, would be far more concerned about missing breakfast or lunch.

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