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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cue View Post
    I'm looking a schools for DD next year too. I've noticed people often mention meeting the principle, is that typically an option? I can't imagine principles have a lot of spare time to meet random prospective families, and the schools in our area are certainly not short on numbers (none take out-of-area except under special circumstances).
    Yes we met with 4 principals over the course of a week. They were more than happy to meet us and give us a tour of their school and answer our questions and introduce us to some of their staff and students. It was really great. They generally don't take out of area but we are moving houses and told them that the school was going to be a deciding factor in where we move to.

  2. #42
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    Naplan is best looked at in terms of student gain, it gives a world more information about the quality of the school than the red/green/white.

    Our school has a large population of international students and is all red on naplan- but student gain is more than a band. Of course the numerous enrichment programs, extra-curriculars and other opportunities speak louder than naplan anyway.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janesmum123 View Post
    With all due respect from memory you work in a school in the mount druitt area. And you have stated on BH numerous times of the problems within the school. Kids who are neglected at home, poverty and low academic records. Now I'm sure you are a fantastic teacher and I'm not having a go at all I have great respect for teachers. However if a school continuously can not answer Naplan questions correctly and falls below the average time after time in all categories I would not send a child there.

    And let's be honest here you wouldnt send your kids to the school you teach in and you have said numerous times you would never raise a family in the area. And I agree with you because I know the area well.
    To be fair there is a big selection of teachers here all supporting the same thing - that NAPLAN is not a useful way to judge the quality of the school or the quality of the teaching and choosing the best fit for a child.

    There are far broader and richer considerations than NAPLAN.

  4. #44
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    Default Poor NAPLAN results for local school...

    I'll probably be flamed but I think in the right school naplan can be great. When DD1 did it 2 years ago a lot of parents found it very helpful to identify areas where their kids needed support. 2 kids had undiagnosed dyslexia picked up.

    So I'm not anti Naplan necessarily. At the school my kids are currently at (my girls) you wouldn't even know it was happening.

    But yeah I wouldn't even read the myschool website.
    Last edited by Sonja; 20-03-2016 at 08:26.

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonja View Post
    I'll probably be flamed but I think in the right school naplan can be great. When DD1 did it 2 years ago a lot of parents found it very helpful to identify areas where their kids needed support. 2 kids had undiagnosed dyslexia picked up.

    So I'm not anti Naplan necessarily. At the school my kids are currently at (my girls) you wouldn't even know it was happening.
    But good teaching and leaning in a classroom does this, that's what s teacher does. I think dyslexia being picked up on NAPLAN is a big concern. That it took a child to get to grade 3 to have it picked up on a test, it would make me wonder how this had not been flagged in the 4 years in the classroom previously. FWIW I'm not anti NAPLAN, I just don't care about it as data for individual children. There are much richer ways to assess children for learning need which should be happening daily, weekly as part of being at school. As system and as partly school data NAPLAN is useful.

  6. #46
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    I wouldn't rely on NAPLAN and I actually don't even care if my son did it or not. In fact, if I could get him out of doing it, I would. I remember hating standardised testing in primary school because it just put so much pressure on me! and I was one of the students that did really well. I remember being one of the top achievers in the State in science in year 7, and then feeling overwhelming pressure to be really good at science after that. But the following year I absolutely hated it and then felt like a failure because I should have been good at it. I also remember feeling bitterly disappointed and depressed that I didn't get into a selective high school. 12 year olds shouldn't be made to feel like that. I think there are more important things in life than doing well on tests. And a school that only focuses on that isn't a school I would send my kids to.

    As an example, my half brother goes to a very prestigious private school and was the highest achiever in naplan in year 3 in his school, and one of the highest in the state. But in the years leading up to year 3 (he started the school in preschool), he was horribly bullied by some other boys and the school handled it terribly. They completely ignored it and were forcing him to socialise with the bullies out of school (they had a policy that all children had to be invited to each other's birthday parties - I've never heard anything so ridiculous). Anyway, he was basically in a living hell socially for about a year and came close to changing schools numerous times.

    The way the handled it at the school was disgusting. But he had amazing NAPLAN results and the school is one of the top in the state when it comes to naplan. I wouldn't send my kids there even if it was free!

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    Quote Originally Posted by babyla View Post
    But good teaching and leaning in a classroom does this, that's what s teacher does. I think dyslexia being picked up on NAPLAN is a big concern. That it took a child to get to grade 3 to have it picked up on a test, it would make me wonder how this had not been flagged in the 4 years in the classroom previously. FWIW I'm not anti NAPLAN, I just don't care about it as data for individual children. There are much richer ways to assess children for learning need which should be happening daily, weekly as part of being at school. As system and as partly school data NAPLAN is useful.
    I agree which is one of the many reasons we moved our kids from this school. Classroom sizes were huge and while the teachers individually were great they lacked support. If a child was basically "ok" the focus was on kids who had more needs. Kids slipped under the radar. Naplan picked this up. As a result things changed at the school but as a state school it still has class sizes that were large and was under resourced.

    These are the sorts of things that would be a flag for me. I have a love hate relationship with naplan as I think it's misused.

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  9. #48
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    Default Poor NAPLAN results for local school...

    Quote Originally Posted by Sonja View Post
    I agree which is one of the many reasons we moved our kids from this school. Classroom sizes were huge and while the teachers individually were great they lacked support. If a child was basically "ok" the focus was on kids who had more needs. Kids slipped under the radar. Naplan picked this up. As a result things changed at the school but as a state school it still has class sizes that were large and was under resourced.

    These are the sorts of things that would be a flag for me. I have a love hate relationship with naplan as I think it's misused.
    Yeah class sizes are something on my radar too. I have been to 2 schools recently to check out for DS. The first the curriculum is amazing, everything I could want but prep sizes of 24 and the second the curriculum is terrible but prep sizes of 16, which I love but don't think I can sacrifice an excellent curriculum. Interestingly it's the private school with the large sizes and the state which the small. It really is hard being on the other side of the fence and has given me a whole new appreciation of the angst parents go through in choosing a school.

    I agree it's entirely misused, it should definitely not be data for developing teaching and learning or setting student goals but unfortunately it's being used that way. It really dumbs teaching down.

  10. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janesmum123 View Post
    With all due respect from memory you work in a school in the mount druitt area. And you have stated on BH numerous times of the problems within the school. Kids who are neglected at home, poverty and low academic records. Now I'm sure you are a fantastic teacher and I'm not having a go at all I have great respect for teachers. However if a school continuously can not answer Naplan questions correctly and falls below the average time after time in all categories I would not send a child there.

    And let's be honest here you wouldnt send your kids to the school you teach in and you have said numerous times you would never raise a family in the area. And I agree with you because I know the area well.
    Umm, I would absolutely send my kids to the school I work at because the teachers are fantastic and I know what the school offers. I live 50km from work and only work 3 days so I would not drive that far the other 2 days as it is so far away. But I personally wouldn't send my children to the same school I work at even if it was the best school in Australia. I've got a transfer in so I can be closer to home but I purposely didn't put my children's school down to transfer to.

    We have behaviour issues because we have a special education unit of 3 classes. One of those classes is an emotional disturbance/behaviour disorder class. The problems in our school come from these kids 99% of the time and 99% of our behaviour issues start in the playground, not in class.

    Also, if you actually look at the NAPLAN results I posted, we actually achieve the same or better as like schools in 2015, so our results are going up, but when you compare a school with 75% of students in the bottom quarter of social advantage, then of course when compared with ALL schools it will be majority in the red.

    I will bet my bottom dollar that our students achieve much bigger growth than a school in Pymble.

  11. #50
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    I haven't read all of the responses but thought I'd add that I have a student in my class who aced the NAPLAN tests that were based on multiple choice... He's the lowest achiever in my class... The naplan results are often mismatched to their performance in class and on curriculum based assessment. I've also had straight A students flunk NAPLAN. My son is doing NAPLAN for the first time this year... He's a very high achiever... The last thing I want is for him to put pressure on himself for a test that has no bearing on his overall report card marks.


 

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