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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Koarlo View Post
    Definitely not Op. But they will be more careful around you in the future I imagine. I'm fairly confident it was just a case of a poorly trained/ guided child care worker. It's totally fine to leave it up to the room leader. Part of their role is managing the staff in their room, ensuring they are adhering to center policies and procedures, and are interacting with children in a positive, professional and appropriate manner. If it was happening over and over again you would then take it up with the director.
    I would just like to add, children need adults to advocate for their rights. If you see something happening you feel is wrong, don't be scared to ask questions.
    This is one of my concerns about using cc at all as this might be one isolated incident or this may be standard practice how does anyone know what really goes on in these places? My eldest went to an on paper fantastic daycare when she was just 12 months. Great policies, systems 1:3 ratio etc... But despite promising a primary caregiver for consistency one day they just changed her carer and often when I was there I felt the staff were disengaged from the kids. They had webcams too and the carers just seemed to sit around chatting to each other. Ok so no serious issues but this was a new expensive centre but I was glad I could take her out after 2 months. This was in London here they all look seriously understaffed to me and so hard to get kids into them so everyone has to put up with it? Sorry probably not right place for a rant just sad to hear about this incident and fuels my distrust in these centres...

  2. #32
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    Very upsetting to read I hope the childcare do something about that carer.

    We had an incident with my son a couple of years ago in the childcare and they ended up firing the carer over it. She was the room leader too!

    If you feel uncomfortable about their practices, I would definitely speak to the director. If things need to change or be clarified for you to be comfortable sending your daughter there, then it's important for you to speak to them.

  3. #33
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    That’s a bit upsetting to read. My best friends toddler is in the same centre as mine and if I was in the same situation I probably would have picked him up and def would have told my friend.

  4. #34
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    Default How would you handle this? Childcare issue.

    Just a quick update: when I got there this morning my friend was there speaking to the room leader about what I'd told her and how unhappy she was with what had happened. She motioned me over and I recounted the events to the room leader who was quite frankly horrified. She explained that that is definitely not how any behaviour should have been dealt with. She assured us that the moment the director gets in she'll be going to see her about it. The carer in question won't be in our children's room until the whole matter is sorted either. The room leader also asked us to put everything that happened in writing and send it to her and the director asap, which I've done now. I'm feeling a bit better because I feel they're taking it all seriously and that it is a case of a poorly trained carer who is new to the centre.
    Thanks for all your support! I needed to hear that I wasn't overreacting to give me the confidence to act.
    Last edited by BettyV; 09-03-2016 at 11:34.

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  6. #35
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    Great they are taking it seriously, I don't think you were over reacting at all.

  7. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by BettyV View Post
    Just a quick update: when I got there this morning my friend was there speaking to the room leader about what I'd told her and how unhappy she was with what had happened. She motioned me over and I recounted the events to the room leader who was quite frankly horrified. She explained that that is definitely not how any behaviour should have been dealt with. She assured us that the moment the director gets in she'll be going to see her about it. The carer in question won't be in our children's room until the whole matter is sorted either. The room leader also asked us to put everything that happened in writing and send it to her and the director asap, which I've done now. I'm feeling a bit better because I feel they're taking it all seriously and that it is a case of a poorly trained carer who is new to the centre.
    Thanks for all your support! I needed to hear that I wasn't overreacting to give me the confidence to act.
    Thats very reassuring that she was so unhappy about the situation & was wanting to rectify it. Hopefully thr director will also.

  8. #37
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    Haven't read other replies. Your friend would have been told and an incident report would've been done. I assume that time out is used in some centres, but even so I think 2 minutes should've been enough (isn't time out usually a minute per years of age?).

    The carers of course can't smack kids, and sometimes just telling them off isn't enough, so a consequence to his actions may have been necessary. I'm probably in the minority in thinking like this but I personally didn't feel bothered by the description of what the OP saw, except that 5 minutes was probably a bit too long. My DD got bitten at daycare once and I hope the kid who did it knew what he/she had done and that it was wrong. My DD has clear tooth imprints on her arm! Not happy!

  9. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by cheeeeesecake View Post
    Thats very reassuring that she was so unhappy about the situation & was wanting to rectify it. Hopefully thr director will also.
    I was definitely reassured.

    When I picked dd up this afternoon the centre manager came and talked to me, she apologised profusely for the incident, explained that she has met with the carer and had a long conversation. The carer has been asked to reread the centre's behaviour policy. The manager will then be meeting with her again so the carer can demonstrate to her that she now knows how to deal with these situations effectively. On top of this the other carers that were in the room have had a meeting with the room leader to go over what they should have done to intervene and they all role played how they'll deal with these things if they were ever to occur again. As an extra measure the carer involved in the incident will be limited to the preschool room, where the children are older, for the next month while they put more training in place.

    I'm really pleased with how they've responded and kept both my friend and myself informed today. It's helped me regain the confidence I lost in the centre.

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  11. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hollywood View Post
    Haven't read other replies. Your friend would have been told and an incident report would've been done. I assume that time out is used in some centres, but even so I think 2 minutes should've been enough (isn't time out usually a minute per years of age?).

    The carers of course can't smack kids, and sometimes just telling them off isn't enough, so a consequence to his actions may have been necessary. I'm probably in the minority in thinking like this but I personally didn't feel bothered by the description of what the OP saw, except that 5 minutes was probably a bit too long. My DD got bitten at daycare once and I hope the kid who did it knew what he/she had done and that it was wrong. My DD has clear tooth imprints on her arm! Not happy!
    Time out isn't used in my boys' centre and I assume it is not used in any centre. The way they handle behaviour issues in our childcare is to talk to the child and model the correct behaviour. Eg, if a child hits another child, they will say, "gentle hands" and show the child how to be gentle. If a child is having a tantrum, they are put in a safe place with cushions and allowed to calm down but they are free to move where they want. Not forced to stay in a time out. If there is anything close to a time out, it's more of a "time in", where the carer will stay with the child and talk to them calmly.

    OP, I'm so glad to hear that they responded they way they did. It would give you the reassurance that you were not overreacting and that your concerns were valid. But most importantly, it seems they do not accept that kind of treatment of a child.

    I would be absolutely horrified if I found out my son was allowed to cry for 5 minutes without any comfort as a punishment.

  12. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by BettyV View Post
    I was definitely reassured.

    When I picked dd up this afternoon the centre manager came and talked to me, she apologised profusely for the incident, explained that she has met with the carer and had a long conversation. The carer has been asked to reread the centre's behaviour policy. The manager will then be meeting with her again so the carer can demonstrate to her that she now knows how to deal with these situations effectively. On top of this the other carers that were in the room have had a meeting with the room leader to go over what they should have done to intervene and they all role played how they'll deal with these things if they were ever to occur again. As an extra measure the carer involved in the incident will be limited to the preschool room, where the children are older, for the next month while they put more training in place.

    I'm really pleased with how they've responded and kept both my friend and myself informed today. It's helped me regain the confidence I lost in the centre.
    What a great outcome!


 

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