+ Reply to Thread
Page 8 of 10 FirstFirst ... 678910 LastLast
Results 71 to 80 of 92
  1. #71
    AdornedWithCats's Avatar
    AdornedWithCats is offline Winner 2013 - Spirit of BubHub Award
    Winner 2014 - Best Username

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    7,808
    Thanks
    6,758
    Thanked
    3,402
    Reviews
    16
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Awards:
    Busiest Member of the WeekBusiest Member of the Week - week ended 12/6/15Funniest Caption400 Posts in a week300 posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by Tiny Dancer View Post
    Given the way this thread has evolved (Nat curriculum vs play, etc) I thought this may be of interest.

    http://www.scarymommy.com/if-kinderg...ositiveparents
    Yeah I do like the idea of a later school starting age. That's one of the things I don't quite like about montessori - but at the same time, montessori doesn't make kids sit down to learn so it may not be comeasurable with main****** starting age. It would be interesting to see the effects of school starting age in a montessori environment compared with what is known about main******.

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to AdornedWithCats For This Useful Post:

    Tiny Dancer  (08-03-2016)

  3. #72
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    22,839
    Thanks
    6,199
    Thanked
    16,883
    Reviews
    10
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 postsDiamond Star - 20,000 posts
    Awards:
    Bubhub Blogger - Thanks100 Posts in a week
    Quote Originally Posted by binnielici View Post
    @delirium my mother is a teacher (retired but she says once a teacher) over of 40 years experience teaching in early childhood. She always worked in public schools and is a staunch advocate of public schooling BUT she is horrified at the national curriculum, the increasing formalisation of early childhood education and the move away from play based learning.

    It is the early years of schooling I am most concerned about for DS2. I want him to learn to love learning, I want him to be excited by it and to start at an age where it is developmentally appropriate for him to do so.

    Schooling has changed so much since I sent DS1 off to a main****** catholic school. He started preschool turning 6 in April. It was a 5 day fortnight (2 one week and 3 the next). He wore no uniform and shoes were kicked off at the door. There was a mud pit and they spent their day in play based learning.

    If school was still like that DS2 would be entering main******. Instead I have had to look elsewhere.
    You know, I so agree with you. I started school in the early 80's and I remember napping every day on huge comfy cushions, playing heaps. We did start the reading process in Kinder (NSW) but the pressure just wasn't there.

    Now the Kinder I went to is pre school. I'm really not a fan of the move to the constant testing particularly the standardised stuff. I would like to see the Education Dept take a huge breath and follow the Scandinavian model of starting at 7 and basically scrapping NAPLAN type assessments. IME most teachers agree with us. The problem is that have a curriculum to fulfill. Plus now days they are expected to do sex ed.... personal safety.... social and emotional learning. But I digress lol

    My concern with some of these approaches that don't take a 'bit of everything' stance is what happens when they reach high school, university, employment? Unfortunately they are all geared towards performance based stats, standardisation. Kinders now days have crazy expectations placed on them and by high school the academic and behavioural demands are huge.

    I'm not sure what the answer is. Honestly I think we need to completely overhaul our education system and how we define achievement and learning.

  4. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to delirium For This Useful Post:

    binnielici  (08-03-2016),Tiny Dancer  (08-03-2016)

  5. #73
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    6,019
    Thanks
    5,460
    Thanked
    4,397
    Reviews
    20
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    Couldn't read article, it kept on going blank but yep, the fact that so many children start school at 4 years old here in Australia is just wrong!
    I'm surprised there isn't more of a push to move the cutoff date to the year a child turns 6.

  6. #74
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    my house
    Posts
    17,695
    Thanks
    1,391
    Thanked
    7,284
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 posts

    Default Montessori method

    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    You know, I so agree with you. I started school in the early 80's and I remember napping every day on huge comfy cushions, playing heaps. We did start the reading process in Kinder (NSW) but the pressure just wasn't there.

    Now the Kinder I went to is pre school. I'm really not a fan of the move to the constant testing particularly the standardised stuff. I would like to see the Education Dept take a huge breath and follow the Scandinavian model of starting at 7 and basically scrapping NAPLAN type assessments. IME most teachers agree with us. The problem is that have a curriculum to fulfill. Plus now days they are expected to do sex ed.... personal safety.... social and emotional learning. But I digress lol

    My concern with some of these approaches that don't take a 'bit of everything' stance is what happens when they reach high school, university, employment? Unfortunately they are all geared towards performance based stats, standardisation. Kinders now days have crazy expectations placed on them and by high school the academic and behavioural demands are huge.

    I'm not sure what the answer is. Honestly I think we need to completely overhaul our education system and how we define achievement and learning.
    I don't think the problem is naplan. I think the problem is parents placing too much emphasis on sending their child to a school according to naplan results and using myschool website and league tables to choose schools.

    Then this creates a teach to the test environment...

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to BigRedV For This Useful Post:

    cheeeeesecake  (08-03-2016)

  8. #75
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    1,371
    Thanks
    771
    Thanked
    1,769
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 posts
    So much I am nodding along in agreement to in this thread. As a prep/reception/ transition teacher, I 100% believe kids should start school nearing age 6, never at 4. The problem here is usually not the schools - its the parents pushing their 4 year olds in to school so young.

    I also dont have a problem with the national curriculum. The NC contains the content to be taught, & the teacher/ school can choose to do so with whatever method they choose. In my (private) school, we were already exceeding most areas when the NC came in, we certainly didnt have to add any content.

    My experience as an early childhood teacher is that play is now emphasised MORE in the classroom, not less. My entire teacher training revolved around learning through play, & play at the centre of the curriculum. I think its just used in a more efficient way than in thr past. Most kids wont need a nap at school at 6yo, but again, when we send 4 year olds to formal schooling, they will often struggle.

    Montessori does provide some choice, but yes, it is limited in other ways. Children cannot choose to use a material until the previous one is mastered, for example. The can choose activites lower than their current level of mastery, but never higher.

    I agree that any good school or teacher will choose parts from a range of different teaching and learning styles.

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to cheeeeesecake For This Useful Post:

    Gentoo  (08-03-2016)

  10. #76
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    6,311
    Thanks
    2,387
    Thanked
    4,599
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by BigRedV View Post
    I love the new English curriculum. It's much more interesting than regurgitating text types every term.

    I don't think the demands of the curriculum increased much in NSW but this is why I firmly believe parents should be able to keep children home another year if they want or every child just start school the year they turn 6.

    There is a lot of good stuff happening in NSW public schools. Early action for success and the implementation of the L3 program in selected schools gives children more control over their learning.
    I agree wholeheartedly with this. Yet my public school is a massive let down.

  11. #77
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    22,839
    Thanks
    6,199
    Thanked
    16,883
    Reviews
    10
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 postsDiamond Star - 20,000 posts
    Awards:
    Bubhub Blogger - Thanks100 Posts in a week
    For sure BRV. I also believe naplan is just a symptom of govts (both lib and labor) placing numbered benchmarks for performance on an occupation where solely numbers on a page don't define performance. You see it in social work nursing etc too. Of course there has to be a way to know we have good teachers teaching well. I just don't think standardised testing fairly measures that

  12. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to delirium For This Useful Post:

    BigRedV  (08-03-2016),Tiny Dancer  (08-03-2016)

  13. #78
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    2,019
    Thanks
    2,767
    Thanked
    1,012
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 posts
    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    You know, I so agree with you. I started school in the early 80's and I remember napping every day on huge comfy cushions, playing heaps. We did start the reading process in Kinder (NSW) but the pressure just wasn't there.

    Now the Kinder I went to is pre school. I'm really not a fan of the move to the constant testing particularly the standardised stuff. I would like to see the Education Dept take a huge breath and follow the Scandinavian model of starting at 7 and basically scrapping NAPLAN type assessments. IME most teachers agree with us. The problem is that have a curriculum to fulfill. Plus now days they are expected to do sex ed.... personal safety.... social and emotional learning. But I digress lol

    My concern with some of these approaches that don't take a 'bit of everything' stance is what happens when they reach high school, university, employment? Unfortunately they are all geared towards performance based stats, standardisation. Kinders now days have crazy expectations placed on them and by high school the academic and behavioural demands are huge.

    I'm not sure what the answer is. Honestly I think we need to completely overhaul our education system and how we define achievement and learning.
    Couldn't agree more with you in respect of the Scandinavian model and the complete overhaul needed for our education system!

    As for what happens with high school and university DS2 will attend Steiner through to class 12 and then (should he choose to) go to university via an alternate entry provided to qualifying Steiner students.

    I am not concerned that the environment is different in uni. It is self directed learning - which he will have spent the majority of his years at Steiner doing anyway. Also he will or should have the emotional maturity to cope with the demands.

  14. The Following User Says Thank You to binnielici For This Useful Post:

    AdornedWithCats  (08-03-2016)

  15. #79
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    my house
    Posts
    17,695
    Thanks
    1,391
    Thanked
    7,284
    Reviews
    0
    Achievements:Topaz Star - 500 postsAmber Star - 2,000 postsAmethyst Star - 5,000 postsEmerald Star - 10,000 postsRuby Star - 15,000 posts

    Default Montessori method

    Quote Originally Posted by delirium View Post
    For sure BRV. I also believe naplan is just a symptom of govts (both lib and labor) placing numbered benchmarks for performance on an occupation where solely numbers on a page don't define performance. You see it in social work nursing etc too. Of course there has to be a way to know we have good teachers teaching well. I just don't think standardised testing fairly measures that
    Of course. It should be used as a tool for teachers, not published in the smh

  16. #80
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    493
    Thanks
    291
    Thanked
    309
    Reviews
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by Sonja View Post
    There are 2 in WA. we're at one of them. But it's more common in nsw and Vic.
    My DS is probably going to an IB primary school in wa - I suspect the other one

    I'd love to get some feedback from the IB parents if possible as we have 4 different options for primary school (3 independent and 1 state) and I'd especially like feedback for how it suits little boys in general.


 

Similar Threads

  1. Looking for Montessori Child Care in Perth
    By Inspired Mum in forum Childcare Options
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-11-2015, 17:02
  2. Difference between Montessori & Steiner?
    By monnie24 in forum Preschools and Schools
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 09-10-2015, 18:06
  3. CIO method and naps
    By DrDrakeRamoray in forum Pro - Controlled Crying
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 13-07-2015, 17:31

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
free weekly newsletters | sign up now!
who are these people who write great posts? meet our hubbub authors!
Learn how you can contribute to the hubbub!

reviews
learn how you can become a reviewer!

competitions

forum - chatting now
christmas gift guidesee all Red Stocking
Boody Organic Bamboo Baby Wear
Softer than your bub's bum Boody Organic Bamboo Baby Wear
Australia's favourite eco brand has delivered a gorgeous baby collection. Made from organic bamboo, Boody's extraordinarily soft and stretchy, skin-friendly tops, bottoms, onesies, bibs and wraps don't 'cost the earth'. Get 20% OFF! Code BUBHUB16.
sales & new stuffsee all
Pea Pods
Buy 2 Award Winning Pea Pods Reusable One Size Nappies for only $38 (in your choice of colours) and receive a FREE roll of Bamboo Liners. Don't miss out, we don't usually have discounts on the nappies, so grab this special offer!
Special Offer! Save $12
featured supporter
Sudocrem / Infacol
Sudocrem® Healing Cream is a soothing emollient cream which aids and assists in the management of nappy rash, eczema, abrasions, wounds and minor skin irritations. Infacol Wind Drops are an effective method of treating wind in infants.
gotcha
X

Pregnant for the first-time?

Not sure where to start? We can help!

Our Insider Programs for pregnancy first-timers will lead you step-by-step through the 14 Pregnancy Must Dos!