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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by atomicmama View Post
    The Montessori method would definitely be suited to some personality types, just like some do well in main******, others in a home school environment etc. but, from my understanding, you have to commit to a Montessori education pretty early on (3yo?) or it can be harder to be accepted further down the track.
    Yes the Montessori program starts at 3 years. Some schools will accept at 4 years but after that my understanding is a child would only be accepted into the program in exceptional circumstances. This is obviously a strict Montessori environment as opposed to Montessori inspired.

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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by witherwings View Post

    Not doing sport and not allowing imaginative play would be an absolute deal breaker for me. Is this really something parents would want for their kids?

    I guess some kids would suit that.
    Again, this is not true. The montessori philosophy is about not measuring kids worth based on their sporting ability or test scores etc. Of course they do sport! It's just the focus isn't on the competition but on individual development etc.

    I was looking up play yesterday and it's not about discouraging imaginative play. It's more about - why get a child a pretend kitchen/utensils when they can use real ones. Ie. Rather than making a pretend cake or pretending to pour tea from a pretend teapot, let them use a real, child-sized teapot or make a real cake.

    I'll edit this with some links I found yesterday.

    Eta.
    Montessori & play: http://www.amontessorimusingplace.or...ssori.html?m=1

    Montessori & competition: http://southernmontessori.sa.edu.au/...ed-competition

    Montessori & academic competition: http://montessoritraining.blogspot.c...on-in.html?m=1

    These links are just a few I found doing a quick google.
    Last edited by AdornedWithCats; 08-03-2016 at 12:41.

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  5. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by binnielici View Post
    Yes the Montessori program starts at 3 years. Some schools will accept at 4 years but after that my understanding is a child would only be accepted into the program in exceptional circumstances. This is obviously a strict Montessori environment as opposed to Montessori inspired.
    This is no different to sending your child to 3 & 4 year old kinder. But yes generally it's better for them to start early on rather than try and get them into montessori schooling later on. Most primary schools won't allow children in who haven't done cycle 1 (3 year old kinder, 4 year old kinder and prep).

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  7. #24
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    @AdornedWithCats we will have to agree to disagree on imaginative play and Montessori. In the first link you posted the writer clearly labels it 'dramatic' play and makes the distinction between imitation of what is real and what is not real.

    Montessori does not value the imaginary or fantastical. IMO both of these things are vital and important aspects of childhood AND are not mutually exclusive to learning real world skills.

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    I think there are many meanings to what constitutes "play". Montessori doesn't do pretend play. That's a fact. It doesn't like dress ups, toy kitchens and fantasy play. But they describe all learnings as playful and try and make learning fun.

    Outside of Montessori the world sees it as anti play. Within that world they have formulated their own meaning of the concept of play. There is a lot of research that shows pretend play isn't as critical as many people think it is. It's great for many things but there are many parts to an overall education and preschool outside of just pretend play.

    Why we were attracted to it for my younger 2 is with 4 kids I do need them to have independence. I like that my kids can dress themselves from around 3. They like it too. They grow up surrounded by siblings who play with them all the time in many different ways so it suits me for them to spend their preschool years (or year) in a more focused environment. My kids actually like the structure of Montessori and find less structured options of less interest. My son is fascinated by how things work and even as a 3 year old would spend ages pulling things apart and putting them together again.

    Then he wanted to just climb a tree and sit in it.

    So it works for us.

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  11. #26
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    Here is a couple more links if you are interested. There's more if you google "does montessori discourage imaginative play?".

    http://carrotsareorange.com/montesso...-pretend-play/

    http://jordangurganus.com/journal/20...he-imagination

    Imagination is the real substance of our intelligence. All theory and all progress comes from the mind's capacity to reconstruct something. (Maria Montessori, The Child, Society and the World p.48 ).

    Anyway, this is off topic. It's not a discussion of the montessori philosophy thread or an educational philosophy thread. I just think it's a shame there are many misconceptions out there about montessori.
    Last edited by AdornedWithCats; 08-03-2016 at 13:14.

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    But by actually cooking and making bread with real utensils that isn't imaginative/pretend play. That's actual cooking. I'm not in any way criticising the method, but there seems to be a lot out there from Montessori parents and educators that say imaginative play is not discouraged but then go on to describe a method that isn't using imaginative play? I think it's an interesting discussion as many don't understand what it is, much like steiner.

    It certainly isn't a method my kids would enjoy, mine are dreamers and would find it way too restrictive but I am sure it suits some children



    "Clearly, Maria Montessori did see the importance of developing the child's imagination. She just believed that, in order to do so, we must provide the child with new, reality-based experiences. For instance, one comparison that was given in the lecture was that of a child who is given a pretend kitchen, pretend cooking utensils, and pretend food versus a child who is given actual cooking utensils, actual ingredients, and who can perform the actual work of making bread. "



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    Default Montessori method

    My son has an amazing imagination and tells wonderful wild stories. But we found the 2 days a week at Montessori a wonderful balance between his scientific inquiring mind and his whimsical imagination.

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  17. #29
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    I find it funny in this thread that there is a lot of talk of montessori philosophy and practice being too strict/restrictive when I've also heard the opposite elsewhere - that it isn't structured enough and there is too much freedom.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AdornedWithCats View Post
    I find it funny in this thread that there is a lot of talk of montessori philosophy and practice being too strict/restrictive when I've also heard the opposite elsewhere - that it isn't structured enough and there is too much freedom.
    Completely agree. Until this thread it didn't really occur to me that it was restrictive. My son could do what he wanted when he wanted. My older 2 girls went to more traditional day care where there were so many rules about when they could do things which largely came down to supervision and staff ratios. My son was free to do as he pleased.

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