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  1. #11
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    Default Montessori method

    Quote Originally Posted by Sonja View Post
    Wow that's not my experience with Montisori at all. My son attended a Montisori preschool and it was warm, friendly, lots of cuddles and very play based. I loved it because he could go outside whenever he wanted (no rules about "no home corner until 10.30am" and stuff like that. He thrived and my youngest will go to the same school later this year and all of next year.

    My sons preprimary is a mix of Reggiano and montisori based learning and it's a gorgeous class.
    This is an example of exactly what @cheeeeesecake raised above many 'Montessori' programs now are in fact only Montessori inspired. When you attend a 'true' Montessori school or playgroup they are very strict and cold is actually a very good word to describe the manner in which the teachers interact with the child.

    'True' Montessori is not play based (in the sense of the average person's understanding of 'play') at all and is in fact very structured and rigid. The equipment is didactic - in that there is ONLY one correct way to interact with it. Attempts to interact with equipment in other ways are not allowed. A bit of research in to the foundations of Dr Montessori's research will show very clearly why it is this way.

    So I guess in my op I was speaking to the question - which asked about the Montessori method - as opposed to Montessori inspired activities.
    Last edited by binnielici; 07-03-2016 at 13:03.

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  3. #12
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    Thanks everyone. I don't really know much about it, hence asking for advice on where to go for research. I think from what has been said, I'm looking at some Montessori inspired things, rather than true Montessori.

    DS is very independent (or would like to be) and exceptionally persistent. At 15 months, he's just started with imaginitive play, and I definitely don't want to discourage this. I'm also not ok with the strict and cold descriptors. I'm planning to take what works for us, and mix it with what we already have in our tool kit.

    I don't know that giving him glasses to drink from is the best idea - he has a tendency to throw things away when he is finished with them, and our floors are tiled!

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    Oh yes, it woulda like montessori-inspired activites are for you then! The principle (according to montessori)is that children should learn to be careful with their things,so only glass, wood,or I think tin or porcelain? (Sorry,Its been a few years since my training!) is provided. Never plastic. This is why lots of daycares etc dont follo montessori to the T,because its quite rigid. Heaps of ideas on pinterest would have activities which should interest you

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonja View Post
    Wow that's not my experience with Montisori at all. My son attended a Montisori preschool and it was warm, friendly, lots of cuddles and very play based. I loved it because he could go outside whenever he wanted (no rules about "no home corner until 10.30am" and stuff like that. He thrived and my youngest will go to the same school later this year and all of next year.

    My sons preprimary is a mix of Reggiano and montisori based learning and it's a gorgeous class.
    This was a pre school attached the Montessori primary school , not sure if yours is too? They definitely were very strict on when and what you could do and I'm all for rules and discipline but these kids , especially the 6th class ones, even though they were all academically thriving, looked like they were all robots and just were not having any fun plus I'm a big fan of sports for kids and they discouraged any kind of competition

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    Default Montessori method

    Quote Originally Posted by binnielici View Post
    This is an example of exactly what @cheeeeesecake raised above many 'Montessori' programs now are in fact only Montessori inspired. When you attend a 'true' Montessori school or playgroup they are very strict and cold is actually a very good word to describe the manner in which the teachers interact with the child.

    'True' Montessori is not play based (in the sense of the average person's understanding of 'play') at all and is in fact very structured and rigid. The equipment is didactic - in that there is ONLY one correct way to interact with it. Attempts to interact with equipment in other ways are not allowed. A bit of research in to the foundations of Dr Montessori's research will show very clearly why it is this way.

    So I guess in my op I was speaking to the question - which asked about the Montessori method - as opposed to Montessori inspired activities.
    My sons preschool was a true Montisori preschool. Not inspired. Very much glass, ceramic etc and yes one way to do activities only. But he has amazing writing skills from the focus on pencil grip, has gotten himself dressed without any issues since he was 3 and a half including shoes and gets his own food and drinks (he's nearly 5 now).

    The teachers just weren't cold. They were warm and very friendly. They just encourage independence. I guess it pays to shop around.

    sorry OP this is off topic I know.

    ETA I recall hearing someone talk on radio years ago who was a Montisori educator and he was saying, like Steiner, the vast majority have their own interpretation of the principles and are free to do so. I guess when I say strict it strictly followed the aspects that were important to me but I can't say it was 100% strict as I don't really know.

    His prep is definitely inspired not strict.
    Last edited by Sonja; 07-03-2016 at 14:01.

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    Default Montessori method

    @Sonja I think you're edit is accurate. I have been involved with two Steiner schools since DS2 was born and there are clear differences between them despite both being Steiner Education Australia members.

    For what it's worth there are many aspects of the Montessori method I agree with - these are however reflected in Steiner (encouraging independence, allowing children to prepare their food, not using plastic or child proof utensils etc...) however Steiner also not only encourages but actively protects the right of the child to engage in imaginative play
    Last edited by binnielici; 07-03-2016 at 15:06.

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    That's funny @cheeeeesecake as ds' childcare (and school ) have done all the montessori accreditation etc but use non-montessori materials etc and don't appear to be overly strict iykwim. It would really depend on the preschool/school. With everything, there are good and bad ones out there.

    My experience is similar to @Sonja

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    This is kind of off topic but I'm curious as to why it's important for a 3year old to prepare their own food and dress themselves?

    FWIW, my 4.5 year old goes to a normal preschool and they are taught to pack away after playing, dress themselves, help themselves to water/milk, and serve themselves from a table of food for morning & afternoon tea.

    Not doing sport and not allowing imaginative play would be an absolute deal breaker for me. Is this really something parents would want for their kids?

    I guess some kids would suit that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by witherwings View Post
    This is kind of off topic but I'm curious as to why it's important for a 3year old to prepare their own food and dress themselves?

    FWIW, my 4.5 year old goes to a normal preschool and they are taught to pack away after playing, dress themselves, help themselves to water/milk, and serve themselves from a table of food for morning & afternoon tea.

    Not doing sport and not allowing imaginative play would be an absolute deal breaker for me. Is this really something parents would want for their kids?

    I guess some kids would suit that.
    Highly summarised - children are like sponges and it's all a part of allowing them to reach their full potential, as well as respecting them as people, instead of treating them as 'lesser than' adults.

    ETA just google Montessori philosophy and you will get a better understanding.

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    The Montessori method would definitely be suited to some personality types, just like some do well in main******, others in a home school environment etc. but, from my understanding, you have to commit to a Montessori education pretty early on (3yo?) or it can be harder to be accepted further down the track.

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