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    Default Montessori method

    I wasn't exactly sure where to put this, so mods, please move if need be.

    I was wondering if anyone knew anything about the Montessori Method - more specifically, implementing it at home, and activities to do with toddlers thar work within the realms of the Montessori method. DS is a whirlwind, and I want to continue to foster his love of learning, in a way where he is engaged and self directed.

    If anyone has any information, can point me to websites or books, or suggest age appropriate activities, I would really appreciate it!

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    Search Montessori on Pinterest There are loads of activities and links to information on there.

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    Hi!

    I did quite a lot of research on Maria Montessori and her methods in the last few years. Whilst I decided it's not for me a good place to start is:

    https://montessori.org.au

    The Montessori method requires some quite specific equipment, which can be very expensive. However there are activities you can do at home. Also search etsy which has a lot of Montessori inspired activities (don't want to call them toys as part of the theory is that it is work - and play is a waste of time).

    Anyway there are a lot of links and resources on the above website. Depending on where you are you may also be able to find a Montessori playgroup or program at a daycare or school. Montessori schools usually have a parent toddler group and they start school at 3 (everyday but not full days).

    Hope that helps.

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    Yes, my ds attends a Montessori childcare. I'll see if I can find some links for you.

    At home we've set up his toys and books montessori style - so easy for him to access, 1-2 activities per shelf (we have a square/box bookshelf if that makes sense). We put a coffee table and little cupboard in the kitchen where he has a kiddie cutter knife, chopping board, knife, jug, bowls, plates etc and dish rack/tub, tea towels...
    We also got a step from ikea so he can reach the sink and basin in the bathroom. We don't do all the montessori ideas at home as ds' cc doesn't expect us too. It's best to implement things gradually rather than all at once.
    Some things we don't quite do at the moment - ds doesn't have his own bedroom as we cosleep and I don't actively encourage him to choose clothes (though he can reach them in drawers) and toilet learning.

    Good things to implement with toddlers would be practical life things - own sized broom, pouring drinks from a small jug, cutting up fruit and vegies, cleaning up own spills, cleaning dishes (even just taking to the sink or putting in dishwasher is a great start), loading washing (if you have a front loader), putting away clothes, choosing own clothes etc.

    An activity ds loves is putting money in a money box.

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    Racheous has some good activities: http://www.racheous.com/montessori-at-home/

    And montessori child is good for montessori style toys and equipment and they also have a blog and fb page I follow.

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    Quote Originally Posted by binnielici View Post
    Hi!

    Also search etsy which has a lot of Montessori inspired activities (don't want to call them toys as part of the theory is that it is work - and play is a waste of time).
    This isn't true. In montessori, play = work. It's about respecting the activities of the child, that their play/activity is their work.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AdornedWithCats View Post
    This isn't true. In montessori, play = work. It's about respecting the activities of the child, that their play/activity is their work.
    Which is what I said. They refer to a child's activities as work and yes Maria Montessori did say play was a waste of time - specifically it is imaginary or pretense play that she considered a waste of time. Accordingly they are directed to under take real world tasks which in itself I do not object to. However I do object to the exclusion of imaginative play.

    Anyway I digress my apologies OP.

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    Default Montessori method

    I took DS to a 2 year old Montessori pre school ( attached to the primary school) kinda thing where I stayed in the room ( or next door) for 2 X 1/2 days a term and I liked the ideas ( as pp said its letting them get their own drinks, cut their food, wash up after themselves , do the activities and pack away etc ) which is a great idea and DS loved it as it gave him a great sense of responsibility and I did continue some of these things at home but I'll be honest when I looked over at the older kids and watched the teachers interacting with them I found it all very cold - can't describe it really plus once when DS was upset and wanted to come find me in the room next door they literally picked him up and said no you don't get to see mummy ( which set him off more and being only 2 I came out and told them to bugger off in a nice way!)

    They were just too business like for my liking and everything looked a bit robotic whereas I preferred DS to definitely be in a more play based pre school so we never went back , he loves dress up and pretend play which they just don't allow - I love the theory off it but it won't suit all kids

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    As PP (binnicilli?) said 'true' montessori is quite strict and explicit in what the child is allowed to do in their day, & only includes true montessori equipment,which is quite expensive. Most childcare & preschool that use the montessori method now are 'montessori inspired' as opposed to true montessori, as we know a lot more about optimal child development these days, & true' montessori is quite limiting for the child. I would start by searching pinteredt for montessori-inspires activities - they have great ideas such as various types of tray work for the child. Also as PP said in your house, allow the child to use their own 'real' utensils, only provide glass cups and plates instead of plastic, & encourage them to be careful wih them. Envourage them to participate in self care and regular household duties, such as washing dishes,etc.
    I studied the montessori method at Uni (I'm an early childhood teacher), & even though it's not for me, there are a lot of good points too, & you can choose the principles that work for you.
    Last edited by cheeeeesecake; 07-03-2016 at 12:49.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elijahs Mum View Post
    I took DS to a 2 year old Montessori pre school ( attached to the primary school) kinda thing where I stayed in the room ( or next door) for 2 X 1/2 days a term and I liked the ideas ( as pp said its letting them get their own drinks, cut their food, wash up after themselves , do the activities and pack away etc ) which is a great idea and DS loved it as it gave him a great sense of responsibility and I did continue some of these things at home but I'll be honest when I looked over at the older kids and watched the teachers interacting with them I found it all very cold - can't describe it really plus once when DS was upset and wanted to come find me in the room next door they literally picked him up and said no you don't get to see mummy ( which set him off more and being only 2 I came out and told them to bugger off in a nice way!)

    They were just too business like for my liking and everything looked a bit robotic whereas I preferred DS to definitely be in a more play based pre school so we never went back , he loves dress up and pretend play which they just don't allow - I love the theory off it but it won't suit all kids
    Wow that's not my experience with Montisori at all. My son attended a Montisori preschool and it was warm, friendly, lots of cuddles and very play based. I loved it because he could go outside whenever he wanted (no rules about "no home corner until 10.30am" and stuff like that. He thrived and my youngest will go to the same school later this year and all of next year.

    My sons preprimary is a mix of Reggiano and montisori based learning and it's a gorgeous class.

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